Thin Wood Walls

( 9 )

Overview

Eleven-year-old Joe Hanada likes playing basketball with his best friend, Ray, writing plays and stories, and thinking about the upcoming Christmas holiday. But his world falls apart when Japanese planes bomb Pearl Harbor. His country goes to war. The FBI takes his father away. And neighbors and friends in his hometown near Seattle begin to suspect Joe, his family, and all Japanese Americans of spying for the enemy.

When the government orders ...
See more details below
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (49) from $1.99   
  • New (11) from $3.61   
  • Used (38) from $1.99   
Thin Wood Walls

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$6.49
BN.com price
(Save 7%)$6.99 List Price
Note: Visit our Teens Store.

Overview

Eleven-year-old Joe Hanada likes playing basketball with his best friend, Ray, writing plays and stories, and thinking about the upcoming Christmas holiday. But his world falls apart when Japanese planes bomb Pearl Harbor. His country goes to war. The FBI takes his father away. And neighbors and friends in his hometown near Seattle begin to suspect Joe, his family, and all Japanese Americans of spying for the enemy.

When the government orders people of Japanese heritage living on the West Coast to move to internment camps, Joe turns to the journal his father gave him to record his thoughts and feelings. Writing journal entries and haiku poetry offers some relief as Joe struggles to endure life in Tule Lake War Relocation Camp—days filled with boredom, concern for his father, and worry for his brother, who joins the American army to prove the bravery and loyalty of Japanese American citizens.
Thin Wood Walls is a powerful story of a boy who grows up quickly in a changed world.

When the Japanese bomb Pearl Harbor, Joe Hamada and his family face growing prejudice, eventually being torn away from their home and sent to a relocation camp in California, even as his older brother joins the United States Army to fight in the war.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
Eleven year old Joseph Hanada is a lot like other American boys: He loves sports, endures school, and enjoys hanging out with friends. However, on December 7, 1941, he discovers that being an American is not always easy, especially when your family is Japanese-American. The Seattle suburb where Joseph and his family live is quickly infected with tension and suspicion. To many Americans, Japanese immigrants (issei) and American-born Japanese (nisei) look like enemies. Joseph's father, in fact, is soon taken away by FBI agents. Federal authorities, looking for evidence of treason, ruthlessly search the Hanada home. Then, when President Roosevelt signs Executive Order 9066 on February 19, 1942, the fate of the Hanada family becomes inevitable: They are removed from their home—like 120,000 other innocent Japanese-Americans—and they are "relocated" to an internment camp for the duration of World War II. This powerful book is the story of Joseph's and his family's endurance in the midst of American paranoia and prejudice. Throughout his multi-year ordeal, Joseph finds strength through his family, a few friends, and his journal writing. In his journal, Joseph keeps a poignant record of his experiences, and he also writes beautiful haiku (many of which are included in the novel's narrative). Readers of all ages should enjoy reading this well-written fictional account of the Hanada family's ordeals during a shameful period in American history. 2004, Houghton Mifflin, Ages 8 to 14.
—Tim Davis
School Library Journal
Gr 5-8-The bombing of Pearl Harbor puts an end to 11-year-old Joe Hanada's happy-go-lucky life in the White River Valley near Seattle. Basketball, marbles, and Christmas plans are suddenly overshadowed by fears about the war. When longtime acquaintances begin to suspect Japanese-Americans of being spies, even the loyalty of Joe's Caucasian best friend can't soften the hurt of being called names or of having his father, a leader in the Issei community, taken away by the FBI. Joe finds comfort in his journal, where he records his impressions in both prose and haiku. After he is sent to the Tule Lake Relocation Camp in California with his older brother Mike and their mother and grandmother, Joe finds relief from the tedium of confinement in his writing. When Mike turns 18, he volunteers for the Army, eager to prove his loyalty. Not all of the detainees share his desire to fight for the U.S. Some request repatriation to Japan, while others forbid their children to speak English. The inclusion of many differing viewpoints within the Japanese-American community makes this book unique. Featuring a main character who grows and develops as historical events unfold, this well-written novel is a worthy companion to Ken Mochizuki's Baseball Saved Us (Lee & Low, 1993) and Yoshiko Uchida's Journey to Topaz (Turtleback, 1985) and Journey Home (McElderry, 1978).-Ginny Gustin, Sonoma County Library System, Santa Rosa, CA Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
On the brink of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor in December 1941, Joe Hanada and his family search for the perfect Christmas tree, invited to do so by a good neighbor. Joe and his family are Americans of Japanese origin, as are many in the farming community near Seattle, Washington. Soon, too soon, the friendly atmosphere of the place turns to active hatred by some. On December 7th, the FBI takes Joe's father away in his pajamas and the family begins to struggle to carry on. And then it's their turn. The walls of the title tell much about the harsh conditions in the guarded and fenced facilities where the "detainees" must live-each family in a single room. Some of the non-Japanese are good people, some hateful, and Joe's descriptions of them are powerful. Eventually, his father is returned to the family and his older brother joins the American army and is shipped into combat. Joe's first-person narrative is moving and clear in its depiction of this life, so cruel and unfair, though Joe's voice sometimes seems more mature than an 11-year-old. An important and forceful a contribution to the field. (Historical fiction. 6-9)
From the Publisher
"Unique. . . [A] well-written novel." School Library Journal

The author does a fine job of bringing the daily experience up close through the story of an American kid torn from home.
Booklist, ALA

Mriad small humiliations, erupting prejudices, and gross violations of justice are clearly portrayed, though, and readers who've paid any attention to nightly news can draw their own parallels to the imperilment of civil rights in times of national crisis.
Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books

Joe's first-person narrative is moving and clear in its depiction of the life, so cruel and unfair.
Kirkus Reviews

Intricate and informative, the story portrays the clash of love and prejudice with depth and even humor.
VOYA (Voice of Youth Advocates)

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780618809158
  • Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
  • Publication date: 5/19/2008
  • Edition description: None
  • Pages: 240
  • Sales rank: 189,447
  • Age range: 10 - 14 Years
  • Lexile: 620L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.25 (h) x 0.56 (d)

Meet the Author

David Patneaude was born in St. Paul, Minnesota, but has spent most of his life in and around Seattle, Washington, where parts of Thin Wood Walls take place. Stories a friend's family told him about their internment during World War II inspired him to research and write this story.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 9 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(7)

4 Star

(1)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(1)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 9 Customer Reviews
  • Posted July 29, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    Amazing Book!

    Thin Wood Walls by David Patneaude is an amazing book. It talks about a boy, his brother, mother, and grandmother who live in the 1940's when Pearl Harbor was destroyed. They are japanesse. They are forced out of their home by the government and have to go to a concentration camp because the government thinks the japanesse people planned the bombing of Pearl Harbor. This is an amazing book! Just read it!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 16, 2014

    Very good

    If u want to learn more abt japenese internment then read this or : When Justice Failed

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 16, 2013

    I love this book!!!

    My teacher read it to us this year, I liked it sooo much, but the ending wasn't that great. But over all this is a very good book!!!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 1, 2012

    Good

    Loved it but its sad, im about to Skype with David Patneaude

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 23, 2011

    sad

    this book is horible all that happens is that joes brother gets shot at war and his dad comes back

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 7, 2011

    Great Read! Suspenseful Without Action.

    Thin Wood Walls, by David Patneaude, is a story of a young boy named Joseph Hanada and his adventure of growing up as a Japanese-American during the hardships of World War II and the Japanese's attack on Pearl Harbor. With no one else to blame, the Hanada's neighbors and the United State's government turned to the Japanese descendents on the West Coast. Joe's father is taken away by the FBI to be questioned about spy related activity. His mother and grandmother must take control of a broken household, and his grandmother must also choose which country she will show her allegiance to. In my opinion, the most developed and interesting character is the older brother, Mike. He wants to protect his family, but must hold back the urge to fight off his old "friends" who continue to call him a Jap and an enemy spy. This Historical Fiction starts slow, and doesn't have much action but has a strong meaning and a captivating theme of growing up and pushing forward through tough times. I enjoy how the author establishes and develops characters into cornerstones of the novel. I also like the random ties to Japanese culture throughout the book. The author could add more action and description to their time in the internment camp. Other than this, I have no complaints about this book at all. Overall, I enjoyed the book greatly, and even without a lot of action I did not want to close the book until I was finished. The stories of each character grow more exciting, and you will yearn to find out what happens to each person. I highly recommend this book to anyone who enjoys World War II history or any young adult.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 3, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    Thin Wood Walls

    I love this book so much. I first read it in fourth grade. Then my fith grade teacher read it to us. I have read thiss book over ten times. I think the story is really thrilling and I have learned a lot from this book.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 18, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 13, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 9 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)