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Windows Forms 2.0 Programming
     

Windows Forms 2.0 Programming

4.0 1
by Chris Sells
 

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Windows Forms 2.0 Programming is the successor to the highly praised Windows Forms Programming in C#. This edition has been significantly updated to amalgamate the sheer mass of new and improved support that is encompassed by Windows Forms 2.0, the .NET Framework 2.0, and Visual Studio 2005. This is the one book developers need in

Overview

Windows Forms 2.0 Programming is the successor to the highly praised Windows Forms Programming in C#. This edition has been significantly updated to amalgamate the sheer mass of new and improved support that is encompassed by Windows Forms 2.0, the .NET Framework 2.0, and Visual Studio 2005. This is the one book developers need in order to learn how to build and deploy leading-edge Windows Forms 2.0 applications.

 

Readers will gain a deep understanding from Sells and Weinhardt’s practical, well-balanced approach to the subject and clear code samples.

 

  •  Windows Forms 2.0 fundamentals, including forms, dialogs, data validation, help, controls, components, and rendering

  •  Static and dynamic layout, snap lines, HTML-style flow and table layout, automatic resizing, and automatic cross-DPI scaling

  •  Office 2003-style tool strip control coverage, including dynamic layout and custom rendering

  •  Design-time integration with the Visual Studio 2005 Properties Window and Smart Tags

  •  Resource management, strongly typed resources, and internationalization considerations

  •  Strongly typed application and user settings

  •  SDI, MDI, Single Instancing, Multiple-Instance SDI, Single-Instance MDI, database-centric, and document-centric applications

  •  Databinding data-source management, drag-and-drop databinding, the BindingSource, the BindingNavigator, and applied databinding

  •  Events, delegates, multithreaded UIs, long-running operations, simplified multithreading with the BackgroundWorker, and asynchronous web service calls

  •  ClickOnce application development publishing, shell integration, and partial trust security

  •  Best practices for developers transitioning from Windows Forms 1.0 and MFC

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780132797481
Publisher:
Pearson Education
Publication date:
05/16/2006
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
1296
File size:
22 MB
Note:
This product may take a few minutes to download.

Meet the Author

Chris Sells is a program manager for the Connected Systems Division. He’s written several books, including Programming Windows Presentation Foundation (O’Reilly), Windows Forms Programming in C# (Addison-Wesley), and ATL Internals (Addison-Wesley). In his free time, Chris hosts various conferences and makes a pest of himself on Microsoft internal product team discussion lists. More information about Chris–and his various projects–is available at www.sellsbrothers.com.

 

Michael Weinhardt is a programmer/writer at Microsoft, working on the Windows Client SDK. Michael has coauthored a variety of articles with Chris, contributed to the “Wonders of Windows Forms” column at MSDN Online, reviewed several Windows technology books, and generally loves communicating the whys and wherefores of technology to his peers. Michael is sure that his parents attribute his fascination in technology to their purchase of an Amiga 1000 in the mid-80s. They would be right.

 

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Windows Forms 2.0 Programming 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Microsoft is well renowned for usually doggedly improving its products. This book by Sells and Weinhardt shows that trend in action, with its description of MS Windows Forms 2.0. It describes major improvements over version 1. The book is all about UI programming in a Microsoft operating system. The code examples are written in C# and the text shows a close interaction between Forms programming and the .NET framework. What is also interesting is the authors' remark that Forms 2 focuses on writing code for client applications, and not necessarily for web-based applications. After all, the very name .NET was chosen in the expectation that the latter would be what a lot of programmers would want. It is hard to tell what an arbitrary reader of this book might be looking for. But, as a guide, there is now a consistency possible in the look and feel with that of MS Office. The authors allude to a considerable demand in the marketplace for this. And given Microsoft's dominance with Office, this should be no surprise. Although one should add that you are not restricted to your applications having an Office-like look and feel. There is considerable leeway in customising, with code showing how this is done. Also, if some of you have written HTML pages, or web applications that use JavaScript or JScript, then Forms gives you a far richer set of widgets. It can make writing static HTML or HTML/JScript seem very restrictive. The layout of the book and its content should not present any problems if you have done some previous graphics programming (and not necessarily restricted to Microsoft environments). Most of the chapters deal with topics that are now common to any major graphics package. So there is a chapter on drawing basic entities like lines and curves, and filling areas. Another chapter on drawing text. Another on laying out widgets inside a Form (window). Obviously, the syntax is specific to Forms. But not the concepts, and if you already have those, everything else will be straightforward.