Ysabel

( 56 )

Overview

Saint-Sauveur Cathedral of Aix-en-Provence is an ancient structure of many secrets-a perfect monument to fill the lens of a celebrated photographer, and a perfect place for the photographer's son, Ned Marriner, to lose himself while his father works.

But the cathedral isn't the empty edifice it appears to be. Its history is very much alive in the present day-and it's calling out to Ned...

Read More Show Less ...
See more details below
Paperback (Reprint)
$13.37
BN.com price
(Save 16%)$16.00 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (34) from $1.99   
  • New (6) from $8.91   
  • Used (28) from $1.99   
Ysabel

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK Study
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$12.99
BN.com price

Overview

Saint-Sauveur Cathedral of Aix-en-Provence is an ancient structure of many secrets-a perfect monument to fill the lens of a celebrated photographer, and a perfect place for the photographer's son, Ned Marriner, to lose himself while his father works.

But the cathedral isn't the empty edifice it appears to be. Its history is very much alive in the present day-and it's calling out to Ned...

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
The Barnes & Noble Review
Guy Gavriel Kay's Ysabel is a departure of sorts for the Canadian author renowned for his historical fantasies (The Lions of Al-Rassan, The Last Light of the Sun, et al.). This is a contemporary fantasy set in the Provence region of France that chronicles the adventures of a 15-year-old boy who, while accompanying his famous photographer father on a six-week shoot of an ancient cathedral in Aix-en-Provence, stumbles into a millennia-old conflict involving the spirits of a Celtic warrior and a Roman trader who are in love with the same woman. Even death cannot end the love the two men feel for her: Year after year, decade after decade, century after century, the supernatural battle continues (replete with druids, ghostly boars and wolves, etc.) until young Ned Marriner unknowingly becomes involved and, in the process, uncovers jaw-dropping secrets concerning the bloody history of Provence, his extended family -- and himself.

Unlike the Celtic priests referenced in Ysabel, readers will not have to make sense of bird entrails or interpret oracular pigs to know that Kay's latest novel is an utterly readable storytelling tour de force. Ysabel is as meticulously researched and richly detailed as any (and all) of Kay's works, but longtime fans may be a bit surprised by the decidedly adolescent narrative voice and unusually straightforward plotlines in this book. Featuring a typical, hormonal 15-year-old boy as the novel's protagonist (equipped with iPod, cell phone, sarcastic attitude, etc.), Kay's first full-fledged contemporary fantasy should, however, broaden his readership immensely. Blending historical fantasy and psychological thriller with a paranormal-powered coming-of-age tale, Ysabel will not only appeal to adult fantasy readers but also to adolescents who have enjoyed authors that feature compelling teen protagonists -- such as J. K. Rowling and Christopher Paolini. Paul Goat Allen
Michael Sims
… Kay tells a vivid and satisfying tale, with moments of sublime eeriness when past and present blur.
— The Washington Post
Publishers Weekly
Kay (The Last Light of the Sun) departs from his usual historical fantasies to connect the ancient, violent history of France to the present day in this entrancing contemporary fantasy. Fifteen-year-old Canadian Ned Marriner accompanies his famous photographer father, Edward, on a shoot at Aix-en-Provence's Saint-Saveur Cathedral while his physician mother, Meghan, braves the civil war zone in Sudan with Doctors Without Borders. As Ned explores the old cathedral, he meets Kate Wenger, a geeky but attractive American girl who's a walking encyclopedia of history. In the ancient baptistry, the pair are surprised by a mysterious, scarred man wielding a knife who warns that they've "blundered into a corner of a very old story. It is no place for children." But Ned and Kate can't avoid becoming dangerously entangled in a 2,500-year-old love triangle among mythic figures. Kay also weaves in a secondary mystery about Ned's family and his mother's motivation behind her risky, noble work. The author's historical detail, evocative writing and fascinating characters-both ancient and modern-will enthrall mainstream as well as fantasy readers. (Feb.) Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Library Journal
Ned Marriner joins his father, the famous photographer Edward Marriner, for an extended stay in Provence, an area of France steeped in both Celtic and Roman history. Then, a visit to Saint-Sauveur Cathedral in the town of Aix brings Ned together with Kate Wenger, an American exchange student, and a man who appears to be much, much older than one would think—and both Ned and Kate become caught up in another time where the reenactment of an old story draws the two young people into a cycle of myths and legends in which truth, love, courage, and sacrifice are the only things that matter. An explorer of history and myths, Kay (The Last Light of the Sun) has a special affinity for the people behind the larger-than-life legends that persist through time. His latest fantasy blends time and place in a crossing of worlds and universal truths. Highly recommended.


—Jackie Cassada
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780451461902
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA) Incorporated
  • Publication date: 2/5/2008
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 432
  • Sales rank: 244,010
  • Product dimensions: 6.08 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.91 (d)

Meet the Author

Guy Gavriel Kay is an internationally bestselling author. He has been awarded the International Goliardos Prize for his work in the literature of the fantastic, is a two-time winner of the Aurora Award, and won the 2008 World Fantasy Award for Ysabel. His works have been translated into twenty-five languages.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 56 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(20)

4 Star

(15)

3 Star

(14)

2 Star

(3)

1 Star

(4)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 56 Customer Reviews
  • Posted August 24, 2009

    Ysabel

    This book is so brilliantly written that I couldn't put it down. The author was able to weave history and fantasy together so precisely that you actually believe that the story is real.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 9, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    terrific contemporary fantasy

    Renowned Canadian photographer Edward Marriner takes his teenage son Ned with him as he shoots the medieval constructed Saint-Sauveur Cathedral in Aix-en-Provence. Though enjoying their Southern France locale, the male Marinners worry about the females in the family, Ned¿s mom and Edward¿s wife Meghan, a Doctors Without Borders volunteer, currently serving in the dangerous Sudan. While exploring a centuries old cathedral without a guide, Ned meets American exchange student, Kate Wenger, a ¿Wikepedia¿ of local historical information. The self-proclaimed female geek takes Ned on a tour of the cathedral, but whereas she sees mystery and beauty he sees a mess of old rocks. However at the baptistry, circa 500 AD, a man who does not belong there holding a knife warns them to leave, as this not a safe place for children to play. However, unable to depart, Ned and Kate become entangled in an ancient love triangle that could prove deadly to the two teenage twenty-first century intruders. --- YSABEL is a terrific contemporary fantasy with a historical base that grips the audience once the teen explorers meet the man with the knife and never slows down through a series of clever twists until the final event involving two sisters directly related to Ned. The story line is fast-paced and filled with historical depth especially involving the Cathedral and the love triangle, but also contains a strong cast whether they lived in ancient times or today. The final spin will stun the audience as Guy Gavriel Kay ties everything brilliantly together in an enthralling enlightening epic. --- Harriet Klausner

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 12, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    What a Book!

    this story has everything!!!!! at the beginning I was not expecting much, but as soon I started reading I was not able to stop for a second...

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 23, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    French Da Vinci Code

    This was an interestingly original book with twists & turns. Not as deep as the Da Vinci Code, which makes it an easier & quicker book to read. I loved it because of it's originality.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 16, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Original & Amazing

    This author's imagination & mind never ceases to amaze and enthral me. Another great work!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 2, 2007

    A reviewer

    At first, I thought this book would be another DaVinci Code like story (which, quite frankly, is the reason I bought it), but I was soon disproved---at least for the most part. Regardless, I was not only captivated, but totally enthralled by it's engaging plot. I recommend this book to everyone.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 8, 2009

    Fabulous read!

    Things are interesting from the get-go! Guy gives you an obscure few pages at the beginning, but then plunges you right in! It's hard to take a breath once Ned discovers what he should or shouldn't have in that wonderful cathedral!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 2, 2009

    A Treasure for Kay Readers

    Oh, what a gift. For those of us who have read and re-read the Fionavar Tapestry and wished for more, this was such a lovely gift. Anytime Kay publishes a book, it's a celebration of prose, but this was all of that and a long-awaited homecoming as well.

    The story is freah and interesting, and we are enveloped in intrigue and mystery on a contemporary plane while becoming intimately involved in an eternal saga. The emotions in this book were rare and invited us to be empathetic with all of the characters.

    Heart-breaking and astonishing, this was absolutely the most perfect conclusion to the Fionavar tapestry that I could never have imagined.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 22, 2012

    Uninteresting characters, silly plot.

    I'm struggling to finish this book, due to it's poorly plotted story and few of the characters are interesting enough to care what is in their future.

    I have a grandson this age, and the author has failed to make his protagonist believable as a fifteen year old boy. Further, his female characters lack dimension and likability.

    Based on some of the reviews, I thought this would be a much better book then it actually is, and although I really like original fantasy, I don't believe I would read any of this author's other work.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 6, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    You got to read!

    This was an amazing book. I love the mystery, suspense, and love. I love when a book throws you for a loop and surprises you at the end, and everything just falls into place! Great book!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 15, 2011

    Excellent!!

    The author has a wonderful writing style that draws you right into the world of this book, with vivid imagery and wonderful characters. Although this book reveals, through the seen and unseen worlds, the beauty of the Provence area as well as its gruesome and bloody history; it is ultimately a story of a love that lasts lifetimes and a family. A family with ties to both worlds and an intensely complicated history stretching back millennia.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 11, 2010

    disappointing

    THis book sounded as if it had all the potential for a very interesting read mixing historical fiction, time travel, Provence, and magic. However, after 150 pages I found that I no longer was interested in what would happen to the main character. It felt long-the story never seemed to really "take off". The main teenage charcter left me turned off. There were some interesting and amusing scenes but not enough to hold my interest.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 23, 2010

    1st Kay read-not impressed

    This was the first Guy Kay novel I have read and I was disappointed. Th book does engage the reader and moves at a quick pace, although I felt confused at the purpose of many events in the book. The story felt unorganized, the character development to me was poor. The story and the characters were not believable for me. The dialogue was awkward to me as well. I think this book was translated so that may be why some of the dialogue seemed off. I didn't feel that the ending explained the relationship to the present and past characters very clearly. You get the idea, but you feel like you need more of an explanation.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 20, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Interesting, but I expect more from Kay

    After reading many of Kay's previous novels, I had high expectations for this book. I was disappointed though by its lack of depth. Characters from his previous novels do surface, but I felt like those who had not read the other novels would miss out on a lot of the nuances of the novel. The author seems to try a little to hard to force himself into the mindset of a teenage boy, and the effect was detrimental to the story. It felt like every other line the boy was listening to some mainstream band on his ipod. The plot was interesting though, and I found myself most interested in the characters from the past, and not very connected to the main characters of the present. All in all, a good read, but not his best.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 16, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    maybe good for young adult genre

    I expected a more intricate and exciting Roman/Celt historical drama. Character development was not strong on the past side. Writing style which seemed to help character development on the present side unfortunately did not suit my taste, which though might appeal to younger readers (teenagers). But of course "The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon" by Steven King would have by far excelled as a young adult read.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 15, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Loved it

    Great book, just read it =)

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 20, 2010

    Not my usual fare, but I tore through it.

    This is a Highlander-like story set in Provence. I was hooked by the historical fiction aspect as well as the setting, and the book moves very fast. It's odd that I am not rating it higher considering how fast I tore through it, but as much as I enjoyed it, I found it a little lacking. Consider it a good, light escape, but don't expect literary genius.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 20, 2010

    An Entertaining Read

    This is one of those books that is not an all-time favorite, but is an entertaining read if you're an avid reader who always must have something going. It started off a little rocky for me - jumped into things very suddenly, I felt - but is worth sticking with it because it turns into a really good story. And once I got far enough in, I couldn't put it down because I wanted to find out what would happen.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 23, 2010

    A good rainy day read

    The plot was good but a bit weak. The characters were interesting and there were enough (most predictable) twists to the story line. I'm happy it was a bargain book, I would have been upset if I had paid full price. Still, it was a perfect one day read in the stormy weather we were having. This was my first purchase from this author.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 1, 2007

    A reviewer

    Kay's 'Fionavar Tapestry' trilogy are three of my favorite books ever - I can read them over and over. That being said, Ysabel is terribly disappointing. The plot is non-existent and the characters are completely plastic - no personality or life at all. Kay found perfection with his earlier works - and perhaps should have stopped there.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 56 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)