A Postcolonial Self: Korean Immigrant Theology and Church

A Postcolonial Self: Korean Immigrant Theology and Church

by Hee An Choi

Paperback(Reprint)

$23.95
View All Available Formats & Editions
Usually ships within 1 week

Overview

A theologically informed look at the postcolonial self that forms as Korean immigrants confront life in the United States.

Theologian Choi Hee An explores how Korean immigrants create a new, postcolonial identity in response to life in the United States. A Postcolonial Self begins with a discussion of a Korean ethnic self (“Woori” or “we”) and how it differs from Western norms. Choi then looks at the independent self, the theological debates over this concept, and the impact of racism, sexism, classism, and postcolonialism on the formation of this self. She concludes with a look at how Korean immigrants, especially immigrant women, cope with the transition to US culture, including prejudice and discrimination, and the role the Korean immigrant church plays in this. Choi posits that an emergent postcolonial self can be characterized as “I and We with Others.” In Korean immigrant theology and church, an extension of this can be characterized as “radical hospitality,” a concept that challenges both immigrants and American society to consider a new mutuality.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781438457369
Publisher: State University of New York Press
Publication date: 07/02/2016
Edition description: Reprint
Pages: 196
Sales rank: 1,126,157
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 8.90(h) x 0.60(d)

About the Author

Choi Hee An is Clinical Assistant Professor of Practical Theology at Boston University School of Theology and the author of Korean Women and God: Experiencing God in a Multi-Religious Colonial Context.

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
Introduction

1. A Korean Ethnic Self (We)

What Is Korean Ethnic Self?
A Korean Ethnic Self versus a Western Concept of the Self
A Korean Ethnic Self (We) in the Context of Christian Faith

2. A Marginalized Self (I as the Other versus We as the Other)

How Immigrants Experience Their Self
A Marginalized Self (I as the Other) in the Racial Formation
A Marginalized Self (I as the Other) in the Discourse of Sex/Gender
From a Marginalized Self (I as the Other) to a Marginalized Communal Self (We as the Other)

3. A Postcolonial Self (I and We with Others)

From a Marginalized Self to a Postcolonial Self (I and We with Others)
What Is a Postcolonial Self?
The Practice of a Postcolonial Self: Radical Hospitality

Conclusion

Notes
Selected Bibliography
Index

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews