A Tyranny of Petticoats: 15 Stories of Belles, Bank Robbers & Other Badass Girls

A Tyranny of Petticoats: 15 Stories of Belles, Bank Robbers & Other Badass Girls

by Jessica Spotswood (Editor)

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781536200256
Publisher: Candlewick Press
Publication date: 03/13/2018
Edition description: Reprint
Pages: 368
Sales rank: 116,890
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 8.90(h) x 1.10(d)
Age Range: 14 Years

About the Author

Jessica Spotswood is the author of the Cahill Witch Chronicles, a historical fantasy trilogy. She grew up near the Gettysburg battlefield, in Pennsylvania, but now lives in Washington, D.C., where she works for the District of Columbia Public Library system as a children's library associate.

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A Tyranny of Petticoats: 15 Stories of Belles, Bank Robbers & Other Bad-Ass Girls 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
DownrightDystopian More than 1 year ago
**Thank you so much to the publisher for allowing me to read this in exchange for an honest review!** To be honest, I've not read that many anthologies. The only other ones I've read are Press Start to Play and Summer Days and Summer Nights. That's why I knew that A Tyranny of Petticoats was one that I wanted to check out, especially because I absolutely loved the other anthologies that I've read. There's just something about short stories. I get attached to the characters and then they're gone forever within twenty pages. There's just something magical about them. Of course I was most excited for the stories by Marissa Meyer, Beth Revis, and Marie Lu. I really liked Meyers and Revis's but Marie Lu's story was actually one that I didn't enjoy all that much which was sort of a disappointment since her story was right in the beginning. I of course ended up loving some other stories as well, such as Elizabeth Wein's. Upon researching the novel a bit on Goodreads, I actually saw that there's going to be another anthology within the same sort of genre by different authors! I'm definitely going to be checking that out when it finally releases because I definitely enjoyed this one.
thelonereader More than 1 year ago
Why I Loved A Tyranny Of Petticoats: 1. True to it's claim on the cover, this anthology is filled with a whole bunch of kickass women who will make you feel freaking proud to be a lady. I didn't really know what to expect from this when I started it, and simply picked it up because I wasn't in the mood to read an actual book. Yes that's a terrible reason to start a book like this, but clearly it paid off because once I started, not only was I delighted, but I literally couldn't stop reading. A kickass woman here, a badass one over there, repeating for the entirety of the anthology, and it is pretty much a fangirl's dream. Add that to the amazing authors who wrote each story - only a few of which I actually recognized, though I'm looking into the new-to-me authors because I love awesome writers - and this book of short stories is my favorite of them all. 2. Anthology deaths hurt too (and we all know how much I love being in crippling, emotional pain). Funnily enough, the first story itself features death, and you'd be surprised by how much it hurts. These main characters are amazing and it's obvious from even the little snippet of their lives we get to read. There are a surprising amount of short stories in this anthology where the main character dies, and even more surprising is how offended I got on behalf of the character when that happened. Like excuse you, how dare you, evil character, cause the death of this super awesome human right here who is so much better than you? There were so many feels and I loved it. 3. I love that a couple of the stories have romance, because for some reason, there are books/people that seem to think that they can't be feminist if they have romance, and there's just so much wrong with that line of thinking. When I first started reading this I actually thought it would be romance-free, but I didn't mind because unlike some books (I'm thinking of Mechanica), it wasn't like the authors were giving the main characters the possibility of love, and then ripping it away, teaching the character that she'd be alone but it was okay because she is feminist. That's not what feminism is. I'm probably explaining this terribly, but what it all comes down to is that this anthology is not stupid, it knows what it's doing with its badass girls, and it is wonderful. 4. The time periods that the stories are set in - well, it's like the authors stuck a hand into my head and gave me exactly what I wanted most. It's no secret that I adore stories set in historical settings, and this book did just that in the most perfect way possible. At first, I thought that all of these stories would be set in a Victorian-like setting, but only a few of them did. The rest were full of people from diverse backgrounds and diverse settings, all of which served to make this anthology intriguing, and kept the reader from becoming bored. There are stories of ghosts, trust, friendship, love, death, and family - all set sometime in the past. There are real life events, there is fiction, and there are stories/characters based on true stories. There's real inspiration in these stories, and nobody who picks up this book will regret it. 5. I wasn't in the mood to start a new story and read it from start to finish, so being able to get a taste of different characters and different worlds/time periods was just what I needed. Read more reviews at http://www.the-lone-reader-blog.blogspot.com
Sandy5 More than 1 year ago
What great variety! I was pleasantly surprised at the variety inside this novel, at the authors and at the subject matter. From all fifteen stories, I only found one that didn’t thrill me but the other ones, what a ride. From the Pulse of the Panthers where I thought Sandy was sitting right beside me as the Black Panthers rode down her lane to the Garnett Girls where Soapy got a gift that he will always remember. I have to tell you about the Pulse of the Panthers as that story ramped me up. I felt as if I were with Sandy as she experienced firsthand the Black Panthers as they stayed on her farm with her father and her granny. Her granny knew what her father was up to but Sandy didn’t realize the full extent of what being a Black Panthers meant. Her father told her that she would be cooking for the men but as they stepped out of their vehicles she realized that some of them were just boys, boys her age and Sandy wanted to know more. Her father wanted her to keep away from them as they talked and did their business on the farm but Sandy found her way amongst them and got an education those few days that they were there. An education that Sandy would not get in a classroom. I loved how the author made me feel a part of Sandy’s life and I loved how much of an education I obtained reading that short passage. There was The Journey, another story that I enjoyed except for the ending. The ending seemed too short and blunt. Yakone wants to learn to hunt and deliver maktuk like his father. Turmoil hits his village before his father can teach him and Yakone must cross the frozen tundra on his own. I love Yakone journey, his ability to find strength within himself to face what lies ahead of him. In the El Destino, the three sisters have a duty but just how far will they take their responsibilities? I really enjoyed the creativity of this short story. In The Raven Ball, a mother is looking for a suitor for her granddaughter while the granddaughter is looking for a spy. I really loved the twists that were inside this short story. In the Gold in the Roots, this was definitely a 5 star read as it dealt with spirits. I let my imagination run wild with this one. I cannot forget Bonnie and Clyde. I love old bank robberies and this story is definitely worth mentioning. The first robbery started at the age of 13 and they haven’t been able to catch this bank thief yet. It’s only started because the parents didn’t have the money to pay on the loans that the bank was calling up to be paid that the idea formed. Now, the parents just needed the money. Why can’t they catch the thief? I could tell you about each short story that is contained inside this novel but I think you understand now that each of these stories is unique and they each represent a specific time period. I wanted to just read a few of the stories at a time but once I started on them, I couldn’t put the novel down. I’ve found myself some new authors to read and I am appreciative of that and I’m got myself some new short stories to tell, and I am happy about that also. This is definitely a great novel to look into. Thanks Candlewick Press for the novel. This is my own opinion of this novel.
Cupcakegirly More than 1 year ago
I'll be honest, anthologies are not my favorite thing to read. While they are a great way to experiece my favorite authors while also being introduced to new ones, there are always stories that leave me wanting more. And knowing a few chapters is all I'm going to get can be frustrating. When I saw the author line up for A Tyranny of Petticoats, I knew it was going to be different, so I decided t give it a shot, and I'm really glad I did! All of the stories take place during different periods in history and feature a cast of strong, diverse female characters. Pirates, spies, outlaws, activists, and screenwriters to name a few. It's impossible for me to review each one individually, but the two that I enjoyed the most and have continued to stick with me are, Madeleine's Choice by Jessica Spotswood, and Leslye Walton's, El Destinos. Even if historical fiction isn't your usual jam, this one has fantasy and mythology elements as well. Read it!