All the Flowers Are Dying (Matthew Scudder Series #16)

All the Flowers Are Dying (Matthew Scudder Series #16)

by Lawrence Block
4.0 14

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All the Flowers Are Dying (Matthew Scudder Series #16) 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 15 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
In Lawrence Block¿s latest Matthew Scudder novel, ¿All the Flowers Are Dying,¿ we find an aging Scudder still ambling through life, the streets of New York, sauntering into his favorite haunts, and still in love with Elaine, a former Call Girl and now his wife. A commitment, I might add, he is nothing less than happy about. Though relieved of duties years ago from the New York Police Department, Scudder makes a decent living through ¿ for the most part ¿ unsolicited private detective work that comes his way in various forms; forms that are real, not your typical mystery writer setups. Along with being a former member of the NYPD, Scudder is also a recovering alcoholic. This is part of the masterful weave that Block allows Scudder to come to life, to ease gently from the page. In ¿All the Flowers Are Dying,¿ Scudder and Elaine ¿ a beautiful, classy lady that most all of us, male or female, would love to know ¿ and not just in a carnal way, are faced with a serial killer who has brutally murdered Elaine¿s best friend, and who is hell bent on killing Elaine and seeking revenge on Scudder. If murder by knife is your cup of tea, or cup of blood, then you will find ¿All the Flowers Are Dying¿ just what the coroner ordered. Lawrence Block¿s rich descriptions of persons, places and things, and his masterful lyrical cadence breathes life and lifts each from the page, allowing a true sense of reality, yet never letting the reader fall to boredom with overlapping metaphors, or sidebars that distract from the plot. For those unfamiliar with Matthew Scudder, you have missed thirty years of magnificently simple characterization that not only illuminates from the page, allowing the reader to feel as if Matthew Scudder is not only sitting next to you whenever you¿re holding these masterful novels, but that he is someone we all wish we knew.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
B00kl0verFL More than 1 year ago
I like Lawrence Block and I like reading.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
There is no such thing as a happy ending as your 16 books have shown and please let me know if there is another?
LynzeeRose More than 1 year ago
Loved this series up til the books began focusing on the voice of the killer. Half the book coming from the voice of the psycho, not the main characters of the series. Not going forward with any others. Didn't finish it.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
The author is apparently a very good writer, but not such a good narrator. I had a hard time getting into this book at first. When you listen to audio books the narration makes a big difference. Thanks to the excellent writing, I did enjoy the book very much. Actually might sit down and read the paperback.
Guest More than 1 year ago
In this, the 16th Matthew Scudder thriller, we meet a changed protagonist. Many of us are old enough to remember when we were first introduced to him some 25 years ago. If I remember correctly, Lawrence Block described him at that time as a former cop turned private eye (sans license) who drank a lot and worried the same. A quarter of a century can bring about many changes, and those years have made their mark on Matthew Scudder. Happily for listeners 'All The Flowers Are Dying' is read by the author himself. A four-time winner of the Edgar Allan Poe and Shamus Awards plus numerous other honors, Block has penned more than 50 books. Think you'll agree that his reading is also deserving of recognition. After all, who knows Matthew Scudder better than the man who created him? Block delivers nuances and chills with the aplomb of a trained actor. As our story opens there's a man awaiting execution in a Virginia prison. He received the death penalty on the basis of massive evidence, yet he maintains that he did not commit three gruesome murders. A psychologist has been interviewing the man, and completes his assignment by watching as the death sentence is carried out. What seems to be a parallel plot develops as Scudder takes on an investigation. It's just the kind of job he likes now - no danger just some probing and then a paycheck. No such luck. The corpses start piling up and it seems that the next to die may very well be Scudder and his wife. Is there a relationship between the convicted killer and these murders? Could the psychologist be involved? Listen as this master of suspense weaves one more of his spine tingling tales. - Gail Cooke
harstan More than 1 year ago
Five years ago, someone raped and killed three little children. All the evidence pointed to Preston Applewhite, who though he denied the deed, was convicted and sentenced to execution by lethal injection. New York Dr. Bodinson visits Preston, pretending to believe the condemned convict is innocent. Not long afterward, Preston is killed by the Commonwealth of Virginia....................... In New York, Matthew Scudder, who retired from NYPD thirty years ago, has reduced his private investigative caseload to practically zero as social security, a city retirement pension, and Elaine¿s income from her shop seems adequate. However, he accepts Louise as a client and looks into the boyfriend David Thompson she met over an Internet dating service. As his simple inquiries tie back to the Applewhite case, he finds evidence of a serial killer who loves to kill when the moment is right; no discernable ¿full moon¿ pattern emerges. This diabolical killer targets the Scudders as his next victims, which means rape and murder is coming home to roost............................. Scudder continues to age with each new book but this time grandpa feels old with his mortality confronting him as he attends several ¿last call¿ funerals of peers. Still once he knows what he must stop, he refuses to back down even if healing seems slower than ever. The serial killer is incredible as he does not fall into the usual profile of obsession. This makes him a worthy opponent of Scudder, whose investigation starts off so simple, but soon spins into a deadly game of battle chess between two capable antagonists. Block writes his usual fantastic thriller that his audience will want to read in one session.............................. Harriet Klausner
Guest More than 1 year ago
In Lawrence Block¿s latest Matthew Scudder novel, ¿All the Flowers Are Dying,¿ we find an aging Scudder still ambling through life, the streets of New York, sauntering into his favorite haunts, and still in love with Elaine, a former Call Girl and now his wife. A commitment, I might add, he is nothing less than happy about. Though relieved of duties years ago from the New York Police Department, Scudder makes a decent living through ¿ for the most part ¿ unsolicited private detective work that comes his way in various forms; forms that are real, not your typical mystery writer setups. Along with being a former member of the NYPD, Scudder is also a recovering alcoholic. This is part of the masterful weave that Block allows Scudder to come to life, to ease gently from the page. In ¿All the Flowers Are Dying,¿ Scudder and Elaine ¿ a beautiful, classy lady that most all of us, male or female, would love to know ¿ and not just in a carnal way, are faced with a serial killer who has brutally murdered Elaine¿s best friend, and who is hell bent on killing Elaine and seeking revenge on Scudder. If murder by knife is your cup of tea, or cup of blood, then you will find ¿All the Flowers Are Dying¿ just what the coroner ordered. Lawrence Block¿s rich descriptions of persons, places and things, and his masterful lyrical cadence breathes life and lifts each from the page, allowing a true sense of reality, yet never letting the reader fall to boredom with overlapping metaphors, or sidebars that distract from the plot¿Larry Thomlinson. For those unfamiliar with Matthew Scudder, you have missed thirty years of magnificently simple characterization that not only illuminates from the page, allowing the reader to feel as if Matthew Scudder is not only sitting next to you whenever you¿re holding these masterful novels, but that he is someone we all wish we knew.