All You Can Eat: How Hungry is America?

All You Can Eat: How Hungry is America?

by Joel Berg

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Overview

With the biting wit of Supersize Me and the passion of a lifelong activist, Joel Berg has his eye on the growing number of people who are forced to wait on lines at food pantries across the nation—the modern breadline. All You Can Eat reveals that hunger is a problem as American as apple pie, and shows what it is like when your income is not enough to cover rising housing and living costs and put food on the table.
Berg takes to task politicians who remain inactive; the media, which ignores hunger except during holidays and hurricanes; and the food industry, which makes fattening, artery-clogging fast food more accessible to the nation's poor than healthy fare. He challenges the new president to confront the most unthinkable result of US poverty—hunger—and offers a simple and affordable plan to end it for good.
A spirited call to action, All You Can Eat shows how practical solutions for hungry Americans will ultimately benefit America's economy and all of its citizens.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781583228548
Publisher: Seven Stories Press
Publication date: 11/04/2008
Pages: 352
Product dimensions: 5.90(w) x 8.90(h) x 1.00(d)

About the Author

JOEL BERG is Executive Director of the New York City Coalition Against Hunger (NYCCAH). He served for eight years under the Clinton Administration in Senior Executive Service positions in the US Department of Agriculture (USDA), creating a number of high-profile initiatives that fought hunger and implemented national service projects across the country.

Table of Contents

Prologue 11

Introduction: Hunger Amidst Plenty: A Problem as American as Apple Pie 13

Section I The Problem

Chapter 1 Who is Hungry in America?: The Politics of Measuring Hunger 25

Chapter 2 How Hunger Costs All of Us 45

Chapter 3 Why Brother (and Sister) Still Can't Spare a Dime: A Short History of Domestic Hunger 53

Chapter 4 The Tattered (But Still Existing) Federal Hunger Safety Net 83

Chapter 5 Let Them Eat Ramen Noodles: One Week Living on $28.30 of Food 99

Chapter 6 Are Americans Hungry-Or Fat? 111

Chapter 7 Dickens Revisited: Life in the New Gilded Age 127

Chapter 8 Let Them Eat Sound Bites: The Polarized Politics of Welfare Reform 157

Chapter 9 The Poverty Trap: Why It Is So Hard to Escape Poverty in America 175

Chapter 10 The Charity Myth 191

Chapter 11 How Media Ignores Hunger (Except During Holidays and Hurricanes) 217

Section II The Solution

Chapter 12 Here It Is: The Plan to End Domestic Hunger 237

Chapter 13 Bolstering Community Food Production and Marketing 259

Chapter 14 A New War on Poverty 275

Chapter 15 How All of Us (Including YOU) Can End Hunger in America 283

Appendix A Hunger and Poverty-Fighting Resources 295

Appendix B Revised Rules for Radical Centrists: Tips for Activists on How to Organize and Craft Messages for Successful Advocacy Campaigns 303

Acknowledgments 315

Notes 319

Index 341

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All You Can Eat: How Hungry is America? 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
plappen on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This book looks at the current state of hunger in America. Written by an anti-hunger activist, and former government official, it is not a pretty picture.If food insecurity (the new euphemism for "hunger") is such a huge problem, then why are there so many obese African-Americans? Doesn't it show that they are getting more than enough food? What it really shows is that those whose food insecurity situation is bad, but not totally desperate, have to rely on cheaper high-calorie food that is full of chemicals and preservatives.Why don't inner-city residents buy more vegetables, even organic vegetables? Most inner-city neighborhoods don't have a supermarket, so the people have to rely on convenience stores, that will carry cheaper pre-processed foods, instead of organic vegetables. Also, if you are given a certain amount of money, and have to make it last an entire week, vegetables are rare, and expensive organic vegetables are simply not a possibility. Find out what your state gives food stamp recipients each week to live on, and see if you can do it.Another problem for inner-city residents is that the various government programs are administered by different agencies, which physically are nowhere near each other. It requires taking time off work, or finding child care, and getting on several buses, in order to go through several different sets of bureaucratic nonsense.Everyone knows someone who says they have seen a food stamp recipient buying lobster or caviar or something else very expensive with food stamps. That is highly unlikely, because the average inner-city recipient has no access to such items, and benefits are distributed on what look like regular debit cards, to reduce the stigma.What to do? Among other things, the author advocates putting all hunger programs together into one giant program. He also advocates making free school breakfasts available for all children, to reduce the stigma for children, and making healthy food much more available in the inner city.This book is a large eye-opener. It is full of practical solutions, and is very easy to read (even with the charts and graphs). It is very highly recommended.
plappen More than 1 year ago
This book looks at the current state of hunger in America. Written by an anti-hunger activist, and former government official, it is not a pretty picture. If food insecurity (the new euphemism for "hunger") is such a huge problem, then why are there so many obese African-Americans? Doesn't it show that they are getting more than enough food? What it really shows is that those whose food insecurity situation is bad, but not totally desperate, have to rely on cheaper high-calorie food that is full of chemicals and preservatives. Why don't inner-city residents buy more vegetables, even organic vegetables? Most inner-city neighborhoods don't have a supermarket, so the people have to rely on convenience stores, that will carry cheaper pre-processed foods, instead of organic vegetables. Also, if you are given a certain amount of money, and have to make it last an entire week, vegetables are rare, and expensive organic vegetables are simply not a possibility. Find out what your state gives food stamp recipients each week to live on, and see if you can do it. Another problem for inner-city residents is that the various government programs are administered by different agencies, which physically are nowhere near each other. It requires taking time off work, or finding child care, and getting on several buses, in order to go through several different sets of bureaucratic nonsense. Everyone knows someone who says they have seen a food stamp recipient buying lobster or caviar or something else very expensive with food stamps. That is highly unlikely, because the average inner-city recipient has no access to such items, and benefits are distributed on what look like regular debit cards, to reduce the stigma. What to do? Among other things, the author advocates putting all hunger programs together into one giant program. He also advocates making free school breakfasts available for all children, to reduce the stigma for children, and making healthy food much more available in the inner city. This book is a large eye-opener. It is full of practical solutions, and is very easy to read (even with the charts and graphs). It is very highly recommended.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago