Building Great Sentences: How to Write the Kinds of Sentences You Love to Read

Building Great Sentences: How to Write the Kinds of Sentences You Love to Read

by Brooks Landon
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Overview

Building Great Sentences: How to Write the Kinds of Sentences You Love to Read by Brooks Landon

Based on the bestselling series from The Great Courses, Building Great Sentences celebrates the sheer joy of language—and will forever change the way you read and write.

Great writing begins with the sentence. Whether it’s two words (“Jesus wept.”) or William Faulkner’s 1,287-word sentence in Absalom! Absalom!, sentences have the power to captivate, entertain, motivate, educate, and, most importantly, delight. Yet, the sentence-oriented approach to writing is too often overlooked in favor of bland economy. Building Great Sentences teaches you to write better sentences by luxuriating in the pleasures of language.

Award-winning Professor Brooks Landon draws on examples from masters of long, elegant sentences—including Don DeLillo, Virginia Woolf, Joan Didion, and Samuel Johnson—to reveal the mechanics of how language works on thoughts and emotions, providing the tools to write powerful, more effective sentences.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780452298606
Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date: 06/25/2013
Pages: 288
Sales rank: 232,691
Product dimensions: 5.30(w) x 7.90(h) x 0.80(d)
Age Range: 18 Years

About the Author

Dr. Brooks Landon is Herman J. and Eileen S. Schmidt Professor of English and Collegiate Fellow at The University of Iowa and Director of the University’s General Education Literature Program. He lives in Iowa.

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Building Great Sentences: How to Write the Kinds of Sentences You Love to Read 4.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
mislmunky More than 1 year ago
Prof. Landon has a strong thesis: sentences should be longer, written with appropriate grammar, given the details and exposition the deserve, their length adjusted for pacing, negating more prominent calls for succinct sentence structure. In other words, don't let three sentences do the work of one. I believe his argument is strongest when he discusses pacing. However, if one were to, in a rush to become the perfect writer, skimming and sifting through stacks of writers' guides and magazine articles, ignoring advice that doesn't match one's current notions of good writing, skip to the pacing chapter, one would breeze past a stockpile of good advice. On the other hand, it also reads like a textbook at times; it makes sense, as Prof. Landon is employed by the greatest writing university in the nation. It also means that, compelled by his argument, you will read, even if you feel like it's homework at times.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Xpectation More than 1 year ago
This is an excellent approach to developing effective sentences.