Chasing the Moon (Large Print Edition)

Chasing the Moon (Large Print Edition)

by A. Lee Martinez

Paperback(Large Print)

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780316232470
Publisher: Hachette Book Group
Publication date: 12/07/2012
Edition description: Large Print
Pages: 448
Sales rank: 801,928
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 1.11(d)

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Chasing the Moon 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 42 reviews.
harstan More than 1 year ago
Diana is apartment hunting when she believes she has found the ideal place for the amount of money she can afford. However, her landlord forgot to mention her roommate in Apartment 5. Inside the closet resides ancient Vom the Hungering monster ready to be served his next meal, Diana is on the menu in case she forgets to feed the vociferous beast. She soon meets all types of new bizarre friends and learns of at least two groups exist. First there are the monsters who dine on humans like her roommate and then there are the monsters who dine on galaxies. However, her new lifestyle becomes imperiled when Calvin the Moon monster plans to make earth into a new asteroid belt. No writer does humorous horror better than A. Lee Martinez consistently does as the author this time satirizes the haunted apartment and apocalypse now themes through a collection of weirdoes. The story line is fast-paced in spite of seemingly being all over the place. In many ways the plot is a coming of age tale as Diana grows into her new role of the monsters' zookeeper and protector. Fans of off the wall urban fantasy will appreciate Diana's new apartment. Harriet Klausner
TadAD on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
If dime novels of the first half of the 20th century had survived, matured and evolved, I think they might have become this kind of story: the lightly-plotted, easily-read, quick hit of brain candy. Don't take this as a criticism¿it's not meant that way¿everyone should have a little guilty pleasure reading once in a while.Chasing the Moon is quite reminiscent of Martinez' earlier Gil's All Fright Diner in its flippant take on denizens out of something like the Cthulhu Mythos deciding to take a chomp out of our world. In a nutshell, Diana finds a dream apartment...except that there's a monster name Vom who eats EVERYTHING trapped in it...and she's his new guardian (unless he eats her first)...and the building is a portal to thousands of realities...and her new sensitivity to the otherworldly means more monsters want to check her out...and there's this cult dedicated to Fenris who wants to destroy the universe (and is well on the road to success)...and, well, you get the idea.This isn't the type of book that will impress you with its significance or astound you with deep thoughts but it will provide a few pleasant hours of chuckles as you ride along with some colorful and entertaining characters. I think I prefer Martinez doing pulp noir comedy (The Automatic Detective) instead of pulp occult comedy but I'll still pick up his next one when I'm in the mood to sit back and kick off my shoes for a bit.
BeckyJG on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Diana, an ordinary girl with a ho-hum job selling coats in a department store, is tired of sleeping on friends' couches. She needs her own place. So when she finds an apartment that's inexpensive and fully furnished (with furniture exactly to her taste, including a vintage jukebox loaded with her favorite songs), she figures that if it didn't come with a slightly creepy landlord with bizarre rules it would be too good to be true. Well, Diana isn't wrong. There's a floppy-eared puppy guarding the door to apartment two, but don't get too close. West, the creepy landlord, never says what will happen if Diana breaks that rule, but Number Two (all tenants are known to West by their apartment numbers) lost control of the dog a year ago and now he's lucky if it will let him out to buy groceries. (Rule 3: Don't pet the dog.) There's a monster in the closet--or, more accurately, a cosmic horror, an ancient entity--called Vom the Hungering. Guess what he'll do if she opens the closet door? (Rule 2: Don't open the closet door.) Food appears in the fridge when she thinks about it and her merest wish suddenly seems to have the power to shape reality.Which actually might be a good thing, since another ancient entity, known in this reality as Calvin, is about to bring the universe as we know it to an end. It's not his fault, exactly, and Calvin actually seems to be a pretty nice guy. But still.As Diana gets a grasp on what's happening to her, coming to terms with her new and seemingly limitless powers (on day one she accidentally burns down the department store where she works when she thinks how nice it would be to have a reason not to have to go to work and on day two she reverses that action) and to the growing parade of cosmic powers in her posse (first, of course, is Vom, whom she convinces not to eat her), she realizes that reality is not as rigid as she once believed.Which is another good thing, because Diana's going to have to give it all she's got to bend reality back once Calvin does his thing.Chasing the Moon is funny on every page. Characters are zany yet have surprising depth, particularly Diana's wise-cracking sidekicks. Possibly best of all is the character of West, who's really only creepy because his day-to-day tasks involve nothing less than world maintenance.Oh, if you were wondering, the first rule is turn the lights off when you leave a room...just because West pays the utilities doesn't mean he's made of money.
Kellswitch on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This was a fun, engaging and hilarious book that was hard for me to put down once I started reading. Of course I have yet to read anything by this author that wasn¿t. I love his take in this book on reality and our perception(s) of it and how everyone responds differently, including the Universe as a whole. A. Lee Martinez is great at creating these little slices of unique realties in his books and making them believable throughout the story so no matter how wild and ridiculous the situations got they never felt out of place or over the top, they fit. He is also great at creating characters that you quickly grow to care about or at least find interesting, even All Devouring Monsters such as Vom the Hungering. He has yet to go back to a universe he¿s created and write a sequel, but I would love to learn more about the other tenants in the apartment building from this book.
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Ive read 5 of the 9 books on this list on nook and this one is my favorite. Must read...and eat...and eat....and eat...
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is a fun ride around our plane of existence. Martinez's characters are usually joe-shmoes facing uphill battles - and this one is of epic proportions. This work was easy to immerse myself into and I gobbled up the pages, reminiscent of Vom. The characters are likable, the tension is paced well, the story is great. Although it feels like Martinez is visiting the same themes a bit much, I still eagerly leap at his books. Thereis always a mote of serious self-reflection at the bottom of all the humor. All-in-all, a balanced work.
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knowcomputers More than 1 year ago
I like stories where people are in strange situations are are trying to make s life and adjust to the new normal.
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Sethbob More than 1 year ago
With some of his previous works being so great, this was a real let down. There is some mildly funny humor and moments but its not worth it. Definitely one of the most anti climatic, boring, disappointing endings ive read. Read another of Martinez, theyre great; skip this one.