Christians at the Border: Immigration, the Church, and the Bible

Christians at the Border: Immigration, the Church, and the Bible

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Overview

Immigration is one of the most pressing issues on the national agenda. In this accessible book, an internationally recognized immigration expert helps readers think biblically about this divisive issue, offering accessible, nuanced, and sympathetic guidance for the church. As both a Guatemalan and an American, the author is able to empathize with both sides of the struggle and argues that each side has much to learn.

This updated and revised edition reflects changes from the past five years, responds to criticisms of the first edition, and expands sections that have raised questions for readers. It includes a foreword by Samuel Rodríguez and an afterword by Ronald Sider. This timely, clear, and compassionate resource will benefit all Christians who are thinking through the immigration issue.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781441245656
Publisher: Baker Publishing Group
Publication date: 12/03/2013
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 200
Sales rank: 1,123,511
File size: 3 MB

About the Author

M. Daniel Carroll R. (PhD, University of Sheffield) is Blanchard Chair in Old Testament at Wheaton College Graduate School in Wheaton, Illinois. He is also an adjunct professor at El Seminario Teológico Centroamericano in Guatemala City, Guatemala. Carroll previously taught at Denver Seminary, where he founded IDEAL, a Spanish language training program. He is the author or editor of several books and a contributing editor to Prism.
M. Daniel Carroll R. (PhD, University of Sheffield) is Blanchard Chair in Old Testament at Wheaton College Graduate School in Wheaton, Illinois. He is also an adjunct professor at El Seminario Teológico Centroamericano in Guatemala City, Guatemala. Carroll previously taught at Denver Seminary, where he founded IDEAL, a Spanish language training program. He is the author or editor of several books, including Family in the Bible, Amos--The Prophet and His Oracles, and Theory and Practice in Old Testament Ethics, and is a contributing editor to Prism.

Table of Contents

Contents
Foreword by Samuel Rodríguez
Introduction
Preface to the Second Edition
Introduction
1. Hispanic Immigration
Invasion or Opportunity?
2. Of Immigrants, Refugees, and Exiles
Guidance from the Old Testament, Part I
3. The Law and the Sojourner
Guidance from the Old Testament, Part II
4. Welcoming the Stranger
Guidance from the New Testament
5. Where Do We Go from Here?
Final Thoughts
Afterword by Ronald J. Sider
Appendix: Selected Resources
Index

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Christians at the Border 3.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
bsanner on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
A helpful introduction to the contemporary issue of human migration, Christians at the Border is composed of two main sections: an overview of American immigration policy and a study of migration (and related themes) in the Bible. Section one is a brief, but helpful, outline of historic shifts in American immigration policy and current perspectives on the contemporary Hispanic immigration. The second section, consisting of three chapters, is the heart of the book: a study of migration-related themes in the Bible (two chapters drawn from the OT, one from the NT). While not an exhaustive study, Carroll, a professor of OT at Denver Seminary, exhibits a deep understanding not only of the biblical material, but also the theological implications and practical applications draw from these texts. B
jpogue on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Before joining in the current national immigration dispute¿whether at the water cooler or on a more significant legislative platform¿one should read "Christians at the Border". This short, but power-packed, work by M. Daniel Carroll R. provides incredible insight into the current debate our country is wrestling through, especially with regards to the mass emigration from Mexico and other Hispanic countries. As a Guatemalan-American Christian, one who is, in his own words, ¿living in the hyphen¿, this author sheds unique light on this controversial topic. Carroll R. begins his discourse with a brief but comprehensive history of immigration in the US, focusing on the cultural identity and economic factors that fuel the emotions of parties on both sides of this volatile issue. His writing avoids the typical dryness of statistics, however. After all, ¿It is ideas and feelings¿ that he is after, ¿not numbers.¿ Even in this historical discussion, Carroll R. seeks to reach ¿beyond the usual boundaries¿ of one¿s point of view. And he eloquently shows us that ¿American identity has never been a static entity.¿"Christians at the Border" then reveals what the Bible has to say about foreigners and their host country. It is here that one can start to formulate an opinion towards outsiders that reflects God¿s love and concern: ¿This book attempts to offer¿a biblical and theological framework from which Christians, as Christians, might participate in the ongoing debate.¿ The author starts with the core belief, found in Genesis 1, that all of us are created in God¿s image. He then follows a beautiful progression of virtues that arise from this profound foundational Truth.What particularly pulled on my heart, though, was Carroll R.¿s description of Jesus¿ love for others, especially those who are marginalized. He says, ¿Jesus models a new and different way of looking at persons who are outside the circle of the known and beyond acceptability.¿ The reader is then treated to a fresh look at two of Jesus¿ famous encounters: the Samaritan woman at the well and the healed leper who came back to express his gratitude to his Savior.While this author avoids doling out unsolicited advice on how loving one¿s neighbor plays out logistically, he does provide a strong, biblical basis for moving, as representatives of Christ, into our world. A world that increasingly brings us face-to-face with those from far-away lands and cultures.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago