Clara Callan

Clara Callan

by Richard B. Wright

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Overview

Winner in 2001 of Canada's two most prestigious literary awards — the Governor General's Award and the Giller Prize — Richard B. Wright's celebrated novel Clara Callan is the powerful, moving story of two sisters and their life-changing experiences on the eve of World War II.

It is the year 1934, and in a small town in Canada, Clara Callan reluctantly takes leave of her sister, Nora, who is bound for the show business world of New York. It's a time when people escape from reality through radio and the movies, when the Dionne Quints make headlines, when the growing threat of fascism in Europe is a constant worry, and the two sisters — vastly different in personality yet inextricably linked by a shared past — try to find their place within the complex web of social expectations for young women in the 1930s.

While Nora embarks on a glamorous career as a radio soap opera star, Clara, a strong and independent-minded woman, struggles to observe the traditional boundaries of a small and tight-knit community without relinquishing her dreams of love, freedom, and adventure. But Nora's letters eventually begin to reveal that her life in the big city is a little less exotic than it may seem: though her career is flourishing, her free spirit is curbed by a string of fairly conventional and unsuccessful personal relationships. Meanwhile, the tranquil solitude of Clara's life is shattered by a series of unforeseeable events, turns of fate that require all of Clara's courage and strength, and that will put the seemingly unbreakable bond between the sisters to the test.

Ultimately, both discover not only the joys of love and possibility, but also the darkerside of life — violence, deception, and loss — lurking just beneath the surface of everyday experience.

Clara Callan is a mesmerizing tribute to friendship and sisterhood, romance and redemption, written with such insight and passion that the characters' stories will remain with you long after you have read the last page.

Author Biography: Richard B. Wright is the author of nine novels, including The Age of Longing, In the Middle of a Life, and Weekend Man. He lives with his wife in Saint Catharines, Ontario.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780060506070
Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date: 12/02/2003
Series: Harper Perennial Series
Edition description: First Perennial Edition
Pages: 432
Sales rank: 641,723
Product dimensions: 5.31(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.97(d)

About the Author

Richard B. Wright is the author of nine novels, including The Age of Longing, In the Middle of a Life, and Weekend Man. He lives with his wife in Saint Catharines, Ontario.

Read an Excerpt

Chapter One

Saturday, November 3 (8:10 p.m.)

Nora left for New York City today. I think she is taking a terrible chance going all the way down there but, of course, she wouldn't listen. You can't tell Nora anything. You never could. Then came the last-minute jitters. Tears in that huge station among strangers and loudspeaker announcements.

"I'm going to miss you, Clara."

"Yes. Well, and I'll miss you too, Nora. Do be careful down there!"

"You think I'm making a mistake, don't you? I can see it in your face."

"We've talked about this many times, Nora. You know how I feel about all this."

"You must promise to write."

"Well, of course, I'll write."

The handkerchief, smelling faintly of violets, pressed to an eye. Father used to say that Nora's entire life was a performance. Perhaps she will make something of herself down there in the radio business, but it's just as likely she'll return after Christmas. And then what will she do? I'm sure they won't take her back at the store. It's a foolish time to be taking chances like this. A final wave and a gallant little smile. But she did look pretty and someone on the train will listen. Someone is probably listening at this very moment.

Prayed for solitude on my train home but it was not to be. Through the window I could see the trainman helping Mrs. Webb and Marion up the steps. Then came the sidelong glances of the whole and hale as Marion came down the aisle, holding on to the backs of the seats, swinging her bad foot outward and forward and then, by endeavor and the habit of years, dropping the heavy black boot to the floor. Settled finally into the seatopposite, followed by Mother Webb and her parcels. Routine prying from Mrs. W.

"Well now, Clara, and what brings you to the city? Aren't the stores crowded and Christmas still weeks off? I like to get my buying out of the way. Have you started the practices for the concert? Ida Atkins and I were talking about you the other day. Wouldn't it be nice, we said, if Clara Callan came out to our meetings. You should think about it, Clara. Get you out of the house for an evening. Marion enjoys it, don't you, dear?"

Plenty more of this all the way to Uxbridge station when she finally dozed off, the large head drooping beneath the hat, the arms folded across the enormous chest. Marion said hello, but stayed behind her magazine (movie starlet on the cover). We quarreled over something a week ago. I can't exactly remember what, but Marion has since refused to speak to me at any length and that is just as well.

On the train my gaze drifting across the bare gray fields in the rain. Thinking of Nora peering out another train window. And then I found myself looking down at Marion's orthopedic boot, remembering how I once stared at a miniature version of it in the schoolyard. Twenty-one Septembers ago! I was ten years old and going into Junior Third. Marion had been away all summer in Toronto and returned with the cumbersome shoe. In Mrs. Webb's imagination, Marion and I are conjoined by birth dates and therefore mystically united on this earth. We were born on the same day in the same year, only hours apart. Mrs. W. has never tired of telling how Dr. Grant hurried from our house in the early-morning hours to assist her delivery with the news that Mrs. Callan had just given birth to a fine daughter. And then came Marion, but her tiny foot "was not as God intended." And on that long-ago September morning in the schoolyard, Mrs. Webb brought Marion over to me and said, "Clara will look after you, dear. She will be your best friend. Why you were born on the same day!"

Marion looked bewildered. I remember that. And how she clung to my side! I could have screamed and, in fact, may have done. At the end of the day we fought over something and she had a crying spell under a tree on our front lawn. How she wailed and stamped that boot, which drew my eye as surely as the bulging goiter in old Miss Fowley's throat. Father saw some of this and afterward scolded me. I think I went to bed without supper and I probably sulked for days. What an awful child I was! Yet Marion forgave me; she always forgives me. From time to time, this afternoon, I noticed her smiling at me over her magazine. Mr. Webb was at the station with his car, but I told him I preferred to walk. It had stopped raining by then. No offense was taken.

They are used to my ways. And so I walked home on this damp gray evening. Wet leaves underfoot and darkness seeping into the sky through the bare branches of the trees. Winter will soon be upon us. My neighbors already at their suppers behind lighted kitchen windows. Felt a little melancholy remembering other Saturday evenings when I would have our supper on the stove, waiting for the sound of Father's car in the driveway, bringing Nora up from the station. Certainly Nora would never have walked. Waiting in the kitchen for her breathless entrance. Another tale of some adventure in acting class or the charms of a new beau. Father already frowning at this commotion as he hung up his coat in the hallway. It's nearly seven months now, and I thought I was getting used to Father being gone, yet tonight as I walked along Church Street, I felt again the terrible finality of his absence.

Then I was very nearly knocked over by Clayton Tunney, who came charging out of the darkness at the corner of Broad Street. It was startling, to say the least, and I was cross with him.

"Clayton," I said. "For goodness' sake, watch where you're going!"

"Sorry, Miss Callan. I was over at the Martins', listening to their radio with Donny, and now I'm late for supper and Ma's going to skin me alive."

And off he went again, that small nervous figure racing along Church Street. Poor Clayton! Always in a hurry and always late. Without fail, the last one into class after recess.

Clara Callan. Copyright © by Richard Wright. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.

What People are Saying About This

Jay Parini

“CLARA CALLAN is one of those rare novels that one might justifiably call a masterpiece.”

Reading Group Guide

Introduction

It is the year 1934, and in Whitfield, Ontario, Clara Callan bids a reluctant farewell to her sister, Nora, who is bound for a career in show business in New York City. In an era when people escape from reality through radio and movies, and the growing threat of fascism in Europe is a constant worry, and when the two sisters -- vastly different in personality yet linked by their shared past -- try to locate themselves in the complex web of social expectations for unmarried young women in their 30s.

While Nora embarks on a glamorous career as a radio soap opera star, Clara, a strong and independent-minded woman, struggles to observe the traditional boundaries of her small and tight-knit community without relinquishing her dreams of love, freedom, and adventure. But Nora's letters eventually begin to reveal that her life in the big city is a little less exotic than it may seem: though her career is flourishing, her free spirit is curbed by a string of unsuccessful personal relationships. Meanwhile, the tranquil solitude of Clara's life is shattered by a series of unforeseeable events, turns of fate that require all of her courage and strength, and that will put the seemingly unbreakable bond between the sisters to the test.

Ultimately, both discover not only the joys of love and possibility, but also the darker side of life -- violence, deception, and loss -- lurking just beneath the surface of everyday experience. Winner in 2001 of Canada's two most prestigious literary awards, the Governor General's Award and the Giller Prize, Clara Callan is a mesmerizing tribute to friendship and sisterhood, romance and redemption, written withpowerful insight and passion.

Discussion Questions

  1. What does Clara reveal about her hopes, dreams, and fears in her letters? How do her letters to Nora and Evelyn compare to her journal entries? What kinds of information does she choose to keep private? What does she decide to share?

  2. How would you describe Nora? In what ways does she differ from Clara? Do these differences come across in their letters to each other? What do you think explains their deep connection as sisters?

  3. What did you think of the epistolary form of narration of Clara Callan? How did reading the constant stream of correspondence between Nora and Clara facilitate your understanding of their relationship?

  4. Discuss Clara's sudden loss of faith in God. How does she make sense of it? What is the attitude of her community towards her lapse in churchgoing? How does Nora feel about it?

  5. How is sex outside of marriage portrayed in Clara Callan? What kinds of romantic and sexual activity were available to "respectable" women in this era?

  6. How does Clara deal with being raped? Did any of her revenge fantasies surprise you?

  7. How is 1930s Europe portrayed in Clara Callan? What did you think of the trip to Italy described in the book? Did it make any aspects of this era more vivid?

  8. What is the significance of "The House on Chestnut Street." What are some of the parallels between the radio show and Clara's and Nora's own lives?

  9. What role does poetry play in Clara's day-to-day existence? What are some of her poetic aspirations?

  10. How is Clara's unmarried expectant state received by her community? How does she handle this development in her life? In what ways will the arrival of Elizabeth Ann change Clara?

About the author

Richard B. Wright is the author of nine novels, including The Age of Longing, In the Middle of a Life, and Weekend Man. He lives with his wife in Saint Catharines, Ontario.

Customer Reviews

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Clara Callan 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 10 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A well written book by the author. The story takes place in Canada and New York City during the 1930's and is about two sisters. One sister is a teacher who stays in Canada and the other sister is a radio star in NYC. The characters are clearly portrayed and at times not too likeable. Clara, the main character, is a sad woman who is very constricted in her behavior and thoughts. You don't know if you like her or are angry at her. There were times when I almost felt sorry for her life that she has in Canada.Her sister, Nora, is more likeable but doesn't have much depth. She seems flighty and lives only for the moment. This is an excellent book for a book club. Lots of things to discuss, infidelity, infidelity, being gay in the 1930's and the relationships of family and friends.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I really enjoyed this book! It is the type of book that you are so involved in that you forget the rest of the world is going on. You also feel very strongly about the characters and the problems they are faced with. I was so angry at Clara's boyfriend that I had to remind myself it was only a story. I also liked the historical references in the story.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I loved this book! The writing is sparse and simple yet powerful. The characters are fully developed and I found myself anxiously anticipating what would happen to Clara next. I loved the strength of this character, I thought she was a quiet rebel and a feminist. I highly recommend this book.
nyiper on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I am so impressed with how beautifully Wright managed to write about the relationship between these two sisters---the audio voices were fantastic as the sisters read the letters they wrote to each other and Clara added in her diary entries. You could just feel their emotional well-being at the writing of each letter. Positioning of this story during the early 1930s---how much would we see changed if the book were written with today's background?
Kryseis on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I once read a satirical website that boasted a recipe for the composition award-winning literature. It had dictums like "thou shalt sneer at conflict" and "thou shalt commit no plot". I thought it was hilarious, sinister, at the time, distant. Now that I have wasted hours of my life - gone, irretrievably gone like the wind - reading Clara Callan, winner of the Giller Prize and the Governor General's Award for Fiction, I now find new bitter meaning in "suckitudinous" fiction.Clara Callan has no real plot. The titular character lives in rural Ontario in the 1930s. She is a school teacher living along, unmarried. An odd woman (incidentally have also recently read The Odd Women, a much better read) she loses her belief in religion, is victim to a random, senseless act of violence by a tramp, goes to New York (where sister Nora resides) to get an abortion and returns to Ontario to become more and more eccentric until she meets the man of her dream: a Catholic, married man who regularly cheats on his wife with the odd women - unmarried women who have given up on finding marital bliss, trapped in a mundane experience, alone, unprotected and perfect for him to stalk and meet in movie theatres. From beginning to end, it's just one long series of events - meaningless violence, meaningless disbelief in God, meaningless sex, etc. The book is told through letters of Clara to her sister Nora and her friend Evelyn and her diary entries. Sister Nora is a radio actress in New York, a minor celebrity, and is very Sister Carrie. My problem is that it was absolutely dull. Certainly things happen, but there's no connecting theme. Does Clara change at all? I think not. There's no evolution of character. In the beginning, she sees the town drunk wearing her deceased father's donated coat and delights in the sight. In the end, she attends his funeral; distinctly out of place amongst the poor, lewd man's rough, unkempt acquaintances. Even after all that's happened to her, she is still the same and sees things around her the same way. No forward motion. No development.And all the references to the 1930s (this book was a piece of historical fiction published in 2006) are corny. Old King George died, handsome King Edward abdicated for that crass American woman, that book Gone with the Wind was published and filmed - it was so tacky. I'm reading the volume of Anais Nin from the same period and the way she references things that we now consider to be historically important is altogether different. The feeling I get when I find familiar things that Anais encounters at the time (Otto Rank for example) is vastly different from the same type of thing in Clara's letters - it is not forced or ostentatious or jarring.And honestly, people with interesting lives don't give vague summaries of current affairs and weather updates in their diaires. In fact, interesting people living dull, sequestered lives don't write mundane drivel either - like Emily Dickinson, for example. This establishes that Clara Callan has the prize-winning combination of being an uninteresting person living an uninteresting life. If you're determined to read this, then I have to offer this Rushdie-ian advice: if dullness be your drug, make your will.
mahallett on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
i really liked this. i liked the letter format. clara was a little boring about her boyfriend but she was in love. i love the review done as a letter. why didn't i think of this?
debnance on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Winner of several awards in Canada. Two sisters travel different ways in the 1930's; story told in letters and diary entries. Recommended.
brsquilt on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Letters & diary in 30's - interesting history
alc1967 More than 1 year ago
Well written but depressing. I kept hoping there would be some redemption in this story, but there wasn't. The writing was good, but there were too many depressing themes that overwhelmed the story. I found it tiring.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The book was very good. As a busy person a book really has to catch my eye in order to pull me in and keep me reading, this book did it no problem. A must read for mature readers