Conversations with Terrorists: Middle East Leaders on Politics, Violence, and Empire

Conversations with Terrorists: Middle East Leaders on Politics, Violence, and Empire

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780982417133
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Publication date: 09/15/2010
Edition description: New Edition
Pages: 191
Product dimensions: 5.40(w) x 8.40(h) x 0.50(d)

About the Author

Reese Erlich’s publications include Dateline Havana, The Iran Agenda, and Target Iraq, which he co-authored with Norman Solomon (introduction by Howard Zinn and afterword by Sean Penn). He reports regularly for National Public Radio, Latino USA, Radio Deutche Welle, Australian Broadcasting Corporation, and Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. He also writes for the San Francisco Chronicle and the Dallas Morning News. In 2001, he produced a one-hour radio documentary, “The Struggle for Iran,” which was hosted by Walter Cronkite.

Table of Contents

Foreword: An Ex-CIA Perspective Robert Baer vii

1 Will the Real Terrorists Please Stand Up? 1

2 Hamas's Khaled Meshal: Middle East's Most Wanted 19

3 Geula Cohen: Jewish Terrorist? 41

4 Syria's President Bashar al-Assad: State Sponsor of Terrorism? 57

5 Lebanon's Grand Ayatollah Mohammad Fadlallah: CIA Victim 77

6 Mohsen Sazegara, Terrorist Governments, and Iran's Democracy Movement 93

7 Mohammad Nizami: The Taliban's Golden Voice 113

8 Media Distortions, Obama's Polices, and Ending the War on Terrorism 135

Afterword: Terrorism and Empire Noam Chomsky 151

Notes 155

Index 177

About the Author 185

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Conversations with Terrorists: Middle East Leaders on Politics, Violence, and Empire 2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
eanest on LibraryThing 7 months ago
Wow. Lots of vitriol here for the US government. Some, or maybe even a lot, of this could be warranted: we have some uncomfortable facts to reckon with in our past and present.That said, the book was so strongly written that I couldn't finish it. Give me a more level-headed critique and I'd be happy to wrestle with its arguments.