Death and the Idea of Mexico

Death and the Idea of Mexico

by Claudio Lomnitz

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781890951542
Publisher: Zone Books
Publication date: 02/29/2008
Series: Zone Books
Pages: 584
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 1.50(d)
Age Range: 18 Years

About the Author

Death and the Idea of Mexico (Zone Books); Deep Mexico, Silent Mexico: An Anthropology of Nationalism; and Exits from the Labyrinth: Culture and Ideology in the Mexican Space .

Table of Contents

Preface: Toward a New History of Death11
Introduction23
Mexico's National Totem23
Death and the Postimperial Condition27
Purgatorius32
Intimacy with Death35
Mexico's Third Totem41
Genealogies of Mexican Death52
The Organization of this Book58
Part 1Death and the Origin of the State
ILaying Down the Law63
The Origin of the Modern State65
Scale of the Dying67
Division Along Ethnic Lines73
Powers over Life80
Powers over Death84
Conclusion96
IIPurgatory and Ancestor Worship in the Early, Apocalyptic State99
Introduction99
Purgatory on the Eve of the New World Conquests101
Days of the Dead in the Early Postconquest Period109
Ambivalence Toward Purgatory as an Instrument of Evangelization122
Conclusion137
IIISuffrages for the Dead Among Spaniards and Indians141
The Sins of Conquest141
Spaniards of Subsequent Generations144
Indigenization of the Days of the Dead148
Attitudes Toward Death Among the Spaniards153
Attitudes Toward Death Among the Indians157
Body and Soul159
The Meaning of Death162
Burial Practices168
IVDeath, Counter-Reformation, and the Spirit of Colonial Capitalism179
The Counter-Reformation and the Spirit of Capitalism179
Death, Revivalism, and the Transition to a Colonial Order183
Indian Revivalism185
Idolatry, Sovereignty, and Orderly Spectacles of Physical Punishment188
The Clericalization of the Indians' Dead192
Death, Property, and Colonial Subjecthood200
Individuation and the Promotion of Purgatory205
Conclusion: Death and the Biography of the Nation215
Part 2Death and the Origin of Popular Culture
VThe Domestication of Mortuary Ritual and the Origins of Popular Culture, 1595-1790223
Purgatory, Miserables, and the Formation of an Ideal of Organic Solidarity223
Death Ritual and Class Identity in the Baroque Era230
Death Ritual, Food Offerings, and Familial Solidarity232
Popular Confraternities and the Consolidation of the Corporate Structure241
Mortuary Ritual and Intervillage Competition246
Popular Culture and the Reciprocal Connections Between the Living and the Dead253
Conclusion260
VIModern and Macabre: The Explosion of Death Imagery in the Public Sphere, 1790-1880263
Death and the Mexican Enlightenment265
Historicizing the "Popular Versus Elite" Distinction271
Tensions in Baroque Representations of Death277
Modernization and the Macabre283
Market Forces292
VIIElite Cohabitation with the Popular Fiesta in the Nineteenth Century305
Why the Urban Fiesta Continued to Grow in the Nineteenth Century305
Evolution of the Paseo de Todos los Santos306
National Reconciliation and Progress: Zenith and Decline of the Paseo de las Animas319
Conclusion: Death and the Origin of Popular Culture336
Part 3Death and the Biography of the Nation
VIIIBody Politics and Popular Politics343
Nationalization of the Dead343
Death and Popular Opinion346
Independence and the Body Politic350
The Caudillo's Remains in the Transition from the Colonial to the National Period353
Rise of Popular Politics357
The Spectral Revolution361
National Relics in the Classical Age of Caudillismo364
Community Appropriations of the Dead369
IXDeath and the Mexican Revolution375
The Resistance of the Souls During the Porfiriato375
Revolutionary Violence383
Death, Social Contract, and the Cultural Revolution391
Death, Revolution, and Negative Reciprocity399
Death and Revolutionary Hegemony, 1920-60402
XThe Political Travails of the Skeleton, 1923-85413
Death and the Invention of Mexican Modern Art413
The Decline of the Dead in the Public Sphere, 1920-60s419
Repression, Democracy, and the Rebirth of the Days of the Dead in the Public Sphere, 1968-82435
The Decline of "Posada Imagery" as Political Critique439
The Depreciation of Life in Mexico's Transition into "the Crisis," 1982-86445
XIDeath in the Contemporary Ethnoscape453
Dos de Noviembre No Se Olvida453
Incorporation and Integration of Halloween460
Mexican Death in Contemporary Ideascapes463
Death and Healing in Contemporary Mexico467
Natural Death, Massified Death479
Conclusion: The Untamable One483
Notes497
Bibliography531
Acknowledgments553
Index555

What People are Saying About This

Friedrich Katz

This outstanding work was written by an author with a Renaissance mind. It examines the Mexican people's in many respects unique relationship to death throughout several centuries. It brilliantly straddles the fields of history, anthropology, and religion.

Endorsement

This outstanding work was written by an author with a Renaissance mind. It examines the Mexican people's in many respects unique relationship to death throughout several centuries. It brilliantly straddles the fields of history, anthropology, and religion.

Friedrich Katz

From the Publisher

This outstanding work was written by an author with a Renaissance mind. It examines the Mexican people's in many respects unique relationship to death throughout several centuries. It brilliantly straddles the fields of history, anthropology, and religion.

Friedrich Katz

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