Deryni Rising (Chronicles of the Deryni Series #1)

Deryni Rising (Chronicles of the Deryni Series #1)

by Katherine Kurtz

Paperback(Mass Market Paperback - Reprint)

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Overview

The classic novel that introduced the Deryni-and launched Kurtz's career.

For more than thirty years, the Deryni Chronicles have transported readers to a world of secret sorcery and courtly intrigue. Now fans of the series can revel anew in the dawning of an epic.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780441016600
Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date: 10/28/2008
Series: Deryni Series
Edition description: Reprint
Pages: 304
Sales rank: 293,379
Product dimensions: 4.10(w) x 6.70(h) x 0.90(d)
Age Range: 18 Years

About the Author

Katherine Kurtz has been writing fantasy for well over twenty-five years. She is married and lives in a renovated castle in the south of Ireland.

Table of Contents

Customer Reviews

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Deryni Rising (Chronicles of the Deryni Series #1) 4.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 35 reviews.
BReese68 More than 1 year ago
Picked this up again after many years and still love it! Mrs. Kurtz pulls you into the characters and the pacing is smooth. If you haven't yet entered the world of the Deryni, you must give this a read!
Guest More than 1 year ago
With this book Katherine Kurtz popped onto the fantasy world. The book serves as a great introduction into her world. The story is very good, ending is more upbeat than a lot of her future books in the series. For long time fans, you may be a little disappointed if you leap on the 'revised' comment about the book. If your expecting a lot of corrections, new stuff, more indepth book, etc your in for a disappoitment. Not that many things were revised but it is still a great book.
sensitivemuse on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I heard this is a very long fantasy series (which is still ongoing), although it is divided into sets of trilogies so the collecting and reading order is easier. There is a chronological order, and order by publishing date and it¿s up to the reader which way to pursue. I love how this book gives you a nice blend of magic, fantasy, and it¿s setting is in a fictional version of the British Isles. This is nice because not only do you have a solid established setting without too much world building, but it also focuses more on the fantasy/magic aspect so you don¿t have to worry much about the setting itself. Besides, I think a setting set in this particular time period is perfect for fantasy to blend into.There is a little background history scattered here and there for the reader, to understand what the current world is going through so that it is more easy to understand. It¿s very similar to the world where the Christian Church wielded immense power, and a small group of people (you could call them `pagans¿ if you wanted to) are either under immense persecution or in hiding practicing their own beliefs. Just add magic to these small group of people and you have the Deryni. I liked this aspect of the book. It gave it a more solid feel, nothing flaky or whimsical about it. It was also nice to see the magic was not over the top, although I¿m not sure what to say about some spell incantations. (Especially during the `epic final battle¿) The spells are said out loud, and it almost has a lyrical rhyme to it although it seems like the magic users just think of the words to the spells randomly as if they¿re writing poetry. What irks me a little is since Kelson is technically a beginner when it comes to magic, how in the world did he manage to find the words to the spells? or is it just an innate skill they were born with? it¿s like a poetry battle, the one who says the best lines wins. It¿s different but I can¿t help but think it¿s a little childish, I thought it could have been much better.The political aspect of the book is good and I enjoyed reading this. As a fan of intrigue in any royal court fictional or otherwise, it¿s always nice to see a bit of political infighting, backstabbing, betrayal, and all the rest. It is a typical story plot of ¿Old King gets killed whodunit, younger inexperienced King comes in¿ but the writing style is good and the reader is kept interested with a rich assort of characters, the main ones with distinct personalities to make them easily identifiable. The characters in the novel are well done. I liked how they were portrayed. My favorites would be Morgan, Kelson and Duncan. Kelson developed quickly and fast yet some parts of him still show he¿s still a boy growing up. I like Morgan and Duncan because although they¿re your average typical heroes, they make a great team. Charissa is the usual archetype of a villainess but her descriptions and personality fit the role well. The one character I did not like was Jehana, although she was a protective mother (overly protective) she annoyed me and her attitude was horrible. I liked how Kelson gave her a good tell off, it did put her back in her place as she was really starting to get to me during a certain part in the book. Towards the end, she still didn¿t get any sympathies from me. This is a good read, and I think it¿ll be great for those who are into epic fantasy. Be prepared, it is a long series, and not completed yet. Rich in detail with an almost realistic setting it might also please those that like historical fiction, and who don¿t mind the deviation from real history.
bokai on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
The setting: Middle Age Europe, but not. There's lots of little kingdoms, a very strong church that makes direct references to Catholic saints, and a whole lot of chivalry and court scenes. Plus, there's magic. Apparently there is a race in this world called the Deryni, who are capable of psychic-like powers. A long time ago some big mean Deryni tried to rule the world, and even though other Deryni helped humanity topple him, their race had been cursed ever since, and they became the witches of this particular universe.The plot: So fast-forward a couple hundred years, and we have a King Brion, his son Kelson, and faithful Deryni lord Alaric Morgan. Brion is murdered by a Deryni sorceress who is pissed over the death of her father, and Brion's court, led by his zealot of a wife, tries to get Morgan executed for treason now that Brion isn't around to protect him. Kelson, fourteen and about to be king himself, has to protect Morgan from from his own mother and prepare for the inevitable attack by the witch who killed his father. Throw in a rite of inheritance, a case of mistaken identity, and some conspiracy, and you've got Deryni Rising.Deryni Rising is a well conceived little book. The writing is nothing to blow you away, but the story is engrossing enough that you don't notice the lack of any impressive style or voice. Kurtz writes a decently complex story that hints at deeper lore without devitubg pages upon pages to biblical sized genealogies. By the end I was satisfied enough that I started on the second book in the trilogy right away.
amandrake on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This trilogy (Deryni Rising, Deryni Checkmate, High Deryni) is quite good if considered as a "young adult" book. As a teen it held me completely rapt, what with coming of age, religious conflict, unreasoning prejudice, and a bit of romance. Later I found it a bit simplistic, but I would easily recommend it to any YA with the least interest in fantasy.
divadiane on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This is one of the earlier books of High Fantasy that followed closely on the heels of The Lord of the Rings. It was the first original novel published in the Ballantine Adult Fantasy Series back in 1970. That said, it is nothing like LOTR. Easier to read, a real page turner, great characterizations and a concise story. It's the first in a trilogy (Kurtz even apologizes in the forward to this edition for starting the trend that Fantasy has to occur in sets of 3), and is a great introduction to the world she's created. Highly recommended!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Although short, this book is the beginning and ending of the Deryni Gwynedd historical fantasy cycle. Read on, Kelson is a fantastic magical king. Savor the rich decriptions of court and fashion. Lovers of medieval history will appreciate the constant tension between Church and State and the theological debate over the inherent evil or goodness of a people who are born to magic.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I have read the entire Deryni Canon, and I highly recommend it to anyone who enjoys fiction.
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Sensitivemuse More than 1 year ago
I heard this is a very long fantasy series (which is still ongoing), although it is divided into sets of trilogies so the collecting and reading order is easier. There is a chronological order, and order by publishing date and it¿s up to the reader which way to pursue. I love how this book gives you a nice blend of magic, fantasy, and it¿s setting is in a fictional version of the British Isles. This is nice because not only do you have a solid established setting without too much world building, but it also focuses more on the fantasy/magic aspect so you don¿t have to worry much about the setting itself. Besides, I think a setting set in this particular time period is perfect for fantasy to blend into. There is a little background history scattered here and there for the reader, to understand what the current world is going through so that it is more easy to understand. It¿s very similar to the world where the Christian Church wielded immense power, and a small group of people (you could call them ¿pagans¿ if you wanted to) are either under immense persecution or in hiding practicing their own beliefs. Just add magic to these small group of people and you have the Deryni. I liked this aspect of the book. It gave it a more solid feel, nothing flaky or whimsical about it. It was also nice to see the magic was not over the top, although I¿m not sure what to say about some spell incantations. (Especially during the ¿epic final battle¿) The spells are said out loud, and it almost has a lyrical rhyme to it although it seems like the magic users just think of the words to the spells randomly as if they¿re writing poetry. What irks me a little is since Kelson is technically a beginner when it comes to magic, how in the world did he manage to find the words to the spells? or is it just an innate skill they were born with? it¿s like a poetry battle, the one who says the best lines wins. It¿s different but I can¿t help but think it¿s a little childish, I thought it could have been much better. The political aspect of the book is good and I enjoyed reading this. As a fan of intrigue in any royal court fictional or otherwise, it¿s always nice to see a bit of political infighting, backstabbing, betrayal, and all the rest. It is a typical story plot of ¿Old King gets killed whodunit, younger inexperienced King comes in¿ but the writing style is good and the reader is kept interested with a rich assort of characters, the main ones with distinct personalities to make them easily identifiable. The characters in the novel are well done. I liked how they were portrayed. My favorites would be Morgan, Kelson and Duncan. Kelson developed quickly and fast yet some parts of him still show he¿s still a boy growing up. I like Morgan and Duncan because although they¿re your average typical heroes, they make a great team. Charissa is the usual archetype of a villainess but her descriptions and personality fit the role well. The one character I did not like was Jehana, although she was a protective mother (overly protective) she annoyed me and her attitude was horrible. I liked how Kelson gave her a good tell off, it did put her back in her place as she was really starting to get to me during a certain part in the book. Towards the end, she still didn¿t get any sympathies from me. This is a good read, and I think it¿ll be great for those who are into epic fantasy. Be prepared, it is a long series, and not completed yet. Rich in detail with an
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Nookhooked556 More than 1 year ago
It pas The Hobbit & Lord of the Rings which fanned the flames of my interest in the Fantasy genre but almost as memorable were the Deryni novels. It must be close to 30 years ago that I began reading this series & it left a lasting impression. It was with pleasure that I found the first three novels available as Nookbooks. Having finished Deryni Rising. I am captivated again by this world with my love for fantasy revived. While not as deep or intricately developed as LOTR, these volumes have stood the test of time & are proving as enjoyable as the first time around. Magic, intrigue, adventure...what's not to love?
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