Designated Fat Girl: A Memoir

Designated Fat Girl: A Memoir

by Jennifer Joyner
3.0 14

Paperback

$15.11 $16.95 Save 11% Current price is $15.11, Original price is $16.95. You Save 11%.
View All Available Formats & Editions
Eligible for FREE SHIPPING
  • Get it by Tuesday, December 26 ,  Order by 12:00 PM Eastern and choose Expedited Delivery during checkout.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

Designated Fat Girl 3.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 14 reviews.
chauceriangirlTX More than 1 year ago
I kept finding myself in Joyner's pages. I allowed myself to get almost to 300 pounds, and recently had lap band surgery. I know what it feels like to think that you're cheating if you seek medical/surgical assistance, and I also know what it feels like to realize that you're not cheating at all by getting said assistance. If you've ever been a binge eater or if you know someone who's seriously obese and want to know what it feels like, you'll want to read this book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It was an alright read. She jumps all over the place in the book and can be a tiny bit confusing but otherwise good read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book had to be one of the hardest ive ever read. At times it is extremely depressing and sad. What Jennifer had to endure is so unfair. This book makes you ask, what is wrong with society? If you are not a perfect size four then people judge and boy do they. I saw a lot of myself in Jennifer as ive always struggled with my weight and was also teased as a child. If just one person that judges can read this and truly understand what overweight people go through, then this book has served its purpose. I applauded Jennifer's courage in writing this and sharing with the world her struggles and humiliatuon.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Not what I thought it would be. Not very inspiring.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I don't think "a beautiful story" would be misleading.  For the most part, this book highlight's the author's struggle with food addiction and the damage it wreaked on her life.  The last chapter or two is devoted to winning that battle.  I enjoyed her honesty about the implications of morbid obesity in a woman's life as well as clear documentation of what food addiction actually looks like.  I also appreciated the emotional struggle she wrestled with toward the end of the book -- that of acknowledging the role food addiction plays as one's coping mechanism and a resolve to avoid self-abuse by other means.  It was a therapeutic book to read and I thank the author for her gracious honesty--it couldn't have been easy, but it was helpful and, in my opinion, a beautiful story.  
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago