Earth Afire

Earth Afire

by Orson Scott Card, Aaron Johnston
4.2 63

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Overview

Earth Afire by Orson Scott Card, Aaron Johnston

One hundred years before Ender's Game, the aliens arrived on Earth with fire and death. This is the story of the First Formic War.

Victor Delgado beat the alien ship to Earth, but just barely. Not soon enough to convince skeptical governments that there was a threat. They didn't believe that until space stations and ships and colonies went up in sudden flame.

And when that happened, only Mazer Rackham and the Mobile Operations Police could move fast enough to meet the threat.
Fans of Ender's Game will thrill to Orson Scott Card and Aaron Johnston's Earth Afire.


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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781429943840
Publisher: Tom Doherty Associates
Publication date: 06/04/2013
Series: First Formic War , #2
Sold by: Macmillan
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 400
Sales rank: 54,156
File size: 849 KB

About the Author

ORSON SCOTT CARD is best known for his science fiction novel Ender's Game and it's many sequels that expand the Ender Universe into the far future and the near past. Those books are organized into the Ender Quintet, the five books that chronicle the life of Ender Wiggin; the Shadow Series, that follows on the novel Ender's Shadow and are set on Earth; and the Formic Wars series, written with co-author Aaron Johnston, that tells of the terrible first contact between humans and the alien "Buggers".

Card has been a working writer since the 1970s. Beginning with dozens of plays and musical comedies produced in the 1960s and 70s, Card's first published fiction appeared in 1977 -- the short story "Gert Fram" in the July issue of The Ensign, and the novelet version of "Ender's Game" in the August issue of Analog.
The novel-length version of Ender's Game, published in 1984 and continuously in print since then, became the basis of the 2013 film, starring Asa Butterfield, Harrison Ford, Ben Kingsley, Hailee Steinfeld, Viola Davis, and Abigail Breslin.
Card was born in Washington state, and grew up in California, Arizona, and Utah. He served a mission for the LDS Church in Brazil in the early 1970s. Besides his writing, he runs occasional writers' workshops and directs plays. He frequently teaches writing and literature courses at Southern Virginia University.

He is the author many sf and fantasy novels, including the American frontier fantasy series "The Tales of Alvin Maker" (beginning with Seventh Son), There are also stand-alone science fiction and fantasy novels like Pastwatch and Hart's Hope. He has collaborated with his daughter Emily Card on a manga series, Laddertop. He has also written contemporary thrillers like Empire and historical novels like the monumental Saints and the religious novels Sarah and Rachel and Leah. Card's recent work includes the Mithermages books (Lost Gate, Gate Thief), contemporary magical fantasy for readers both young and old.
Card lives in Greensboro, North Carolina, with his wife, Kristine Allen Card, He and Kristine are the parents of five children and several grandchildren.

AARON JOHNSTON is a New York Times bestselling author, comic book writer, and screenwriter who often collaborates with science-fiction legend Orson Scott Card. He and his wife are the parents of four children.


Orson Scott Card is best known for his science fiction novel Ender's Game and its many sequels that expand the Ender Universe into the far future and the near past. Those books are organized into the Ender Quintet, the five books that chronicle the life of Ender Wiggin; the Shadow Series, that follows on the novel Ender's Shadow and are set on Earth; and the Formic Wars series, written with co-author Aaron Johnston, that tells of the terrible first contact between humans and the alien "Buggers." Card has been a working writer since the 1970s. Beginning with dozens of plays and musical comedies produced in the 1960s and 70s, Card's first published fiction appeared in 1977 -- the short story "Gert Fram" in the July issue of The Ensign, and the novelette version of "Ender's Game" in the August issue of Analog. The novel-length version of Ender's Game, published in 1984 and continuously in print since then, became the basis of the 2013 film, starring Asa Butterfield, Harrison Ford, Ben Kingsley, Hailee Steinfeld, Viola Davis, and Abigail Breslin. Card was born in Washington state, and grew up in California, Arizona, and Utah. He served a mission for the LDS Church in Brazil in the early 1970s. Besides his writing, he runs occasional writers' workshops and directs plays. He frequently teaches writing and literature courses at Southern Virginia University.
He is the author many sf and fantasy novels, including the American frontier fantasy series "The Tales of Alvin Maker" (beginning with Seventh Son), There are also stand-alone science fiction and fantasy novels like Pastwatch and Hart's Hope. He has collaborated with his daughter Emily Card on a manga series, Laddertop. He has also written contemporary thrillers like Empire and historical novels like the monumental Saints and the religious novels Sarah and Rachel and Leah. Card's recent work includes the Mithermages books (Lost Gate, Gate Thief), contemporary magical fantasy for readers both young and old. Card lives in Greensboro, North Carolina, with his wife, Kristine Allen Card, He and Kristine are the parents of five children and several grandchildren.


AARON JOHNSTON is a New York Times bestselling author, comic book writer, and screenwriter who often collaborates with science-fiction legend Orson Scott Card (Invasive Procedures, Earth Unaware, Earth Afire, Earth Awakens). He and his wife are the parents of four children.

Hometown:

Greensboro, North Carolina

Date of Birth:

August 24, 1951

Place of Birth:

Richland, Washington

Education:

B.A. in theater, Brigham Young University, 1975; M.A. in English, University of Utah, 1981

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Earth Afire 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 63 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The book was entertaining and I have no objection to a book being a set up for a sequel, but the book should at least tell a complete story so that one is not forced to buy the next book. In short, the ending sucked. Although I was and am a huge fan of Ender's Game, I am sorely tempted to refuse to purchase the sequel to this book. If you haven't read this book, wait until you can buy this and the sequel as a set or just forgo the purchase.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This was a very action packed sequal to Earth Unaware. It gives a great deal of detail about the first invasion of earth by the buggers. A lot of background is revealed for Mazar and you see little hints at how the world changed to have a school in space training children as soldiers, a world leadership, and the beginning of the IF. My only negative about the story is that I didn't want it to end. Now we have to wait for the next installment. At least this fall we finally get the Ender's Game movie!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The second novel in Orson Scott Card and Aaron Johnston's First Formic War is a thrilling and exciting sequel. It quickly progresses and expandes on the characters of Victor Delgado, Lem Jukes, Mazar Rackham, and a few others. Some might be disappointed that it ends with a cliffhanger. But there are graphic novels telling the entire story from beginning to end. Out of the Ender series books it is a must read. Looking forward to the third and hopefully final novel.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Was extremely disappointed that the end of the book was a "cliffhanger". I purchased the book with expactions of reading a complete story... not of having to wait for the next book to find out what happens.
book_loverOR More than 1 year ago
I loved the whole Ender series as well as the Ender's Shadow series, but this "prequel" falls short for me. The quality of the writing just doesn't seem to be up to par, the story telling seems forced, and the plotting unlikely and unconvincing in places, something that really jerks me out of the story and spoils the experience. Also, I loved the characters in the Ender series and the Shadow series; I felt drawn to them and really cared what happened to them. I'm just not getting that with Earth Afire. It's just "okay". It answers questions left open by Ender's Game, and in that way it is satisfying; it's not terrible, but I feel it could be so much better.
hjparker More than 1 year ago
This book was far below Card's normal writing. The story was plodding and filled with many repetitive rants of psycho babble.  If Card's other works were as weak as this one I would have never picked up a second book. The storytelling in this book was tedious and I found myself constantly wishing the story would just advance. I am very suspicious that Card had nothing to do with the actual writing. The science and tactics were miserably weak and the plot could be predicted chapters ahead of the story, so by the time you read them, you were just treading water. I have read most of Card's books this one is out of place in the collection. Almost as bad as his "Empire" books.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The fact that this book is "to be continued" sucks and I would not have bought it if I had known it ended that way. Just another way to try and guarantee they make more money with the next book when good writing usually guarantees that anyway. No ending undid all the joy of reading the book. I won't be buying the next one. By the time the next one is done, I won't care anymore. You just lost a huge fan.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The book was good but the ending sucks!
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Rushed battle, yes. But I don't think someone would give in that easily if they have something as powerful as revenge on their mind. But keep going. I'm curious.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This was pretty nice. Slightly rushed l feel still.
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Mariofs More than 1 year ago
"Enders Game" and the next two books were excellent. This and the previous one, "Earth Unaware" were only good. Mr. Card goes too much into minute details about everything. The least likeable thing about "Earth Afire" is the fake ending. It resembles bad TV ads, attempting to pressure one in buying the next book. Since most readers of Mr. Card's "Enders" books have read "Enders Game", the next book, which presumably leads to "Game", may not be as interesting. Maybe.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
RCBMO More than 1 year ago
Good basis for the follow-on books.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I loved every minute of it. I can't wait for the third in the series.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Card and Johnston have an impeccable grasp on the human condition. From military tactics, to governmental policies, to the thoughts and feelings individuals would have in complex situations - they truly make the story believable! I thank them for their unique contribution to science fiction.