Earth Matters: Indigenous Peoples, the Extractive Industries and Corporate Social Responsibility

Earth Matters: Indigenous Peoples, the Extractive Industries and Corporate Social Responsibility

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Overview

Indigenous peoples have historically gained little from large-scale resource development on their traditional lands, and have suffered from its negative impacts on their cultures, economies and societies. During recent decades indigenous groups and their allies have fought hard to change this situation: in some cases by opposing development entirely; in many others by seeking a fundamental change in the distribution of benefits and costs from resource exploitation. In doing so they have utilized a range of approaches, including efforts to win greater recognition of indigenous rights in international fora; pressure for passage of national and state or provincial legislation recognizing indigenous land rights and protecting indigenous culture; litigation in national and international courts; and direct political action aimed at governments and developers, often in alliance with non-governmental organizations (NGOs).

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781906093167
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Publication date: 11/01/2008
Pages: 280
Product dimensions: 6.40(w) x 9.30(h) x 0.90(d)

Table of Contents

Foreword
Wayne Bergmann, Executive Director, Kimberley Land Council

Introduction
Ciaran O’Faircheallaigh, Department of Politics and Public Policy, Griffith University, Australia

1. Corporate social responsibility and democratisation: opportunities and obstacles
Katherine Trebeck, Research and Policy Executive, the Wise Group, Glasgow, UK

2. The impact of resource development on social ties: theory and methods for assessment
Sharman Haley, Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, USA, and James Magdanz, Alaska Department of Fish and Game, Kotzebue Alaska, USA

3. Realising solidarity: indigenous peoples and NGOs in the contested terrains of mining and corporate accountability
Catherine Coumans, MiningWatch Canada

4. Understanding corporate–Aboriginal agreements on mineral development: a conceptual framework
Ciaran O’Faircheallaigh, Department of Politics and Public Policy, Griffith University, Australia

5. Indigenous peoples, corporate social responsibility and the fragility of the interpersonal domain
Richie Howitt, Department of Human Geography, Macquarie University, Australia, and Rebecca Lawrence, Department of Sociology, University of Stockholm, Sweden

6. Corporate engagement with indigenous women in the minerals industry: making space for theory
Ginger Gibson, Norman B. Keevil Institute of Mining Engineering, University of British Columbia, Canada, and Deanna Kemp, Centre for Social Responsibility in Mining, University of Queensland, Australia

7. Archaeological heritage and traditional forests within the logging economy of British Columbia: an opportunity for corporate social responsibility
Bill Angelbeck, Department of Anthropology, University of British Columbia, Canada

8. Indigenous employment outcomes in the Australian mining industry
Tanuja Barker, Centre for Social Responsibility in Mining, University of Queensland, Australia


9. The fragmentation of responsibilities in the Melanesian mining sector
Colin Filer and John Burton, Research School of Pacific and Asian Studies, Australian National University, and Glenn Banks, School of People, Environment and Planning, Massey University, New Zealand

10. Shareholder activism and corporate behaviour in Ecuador: a comparative study of two oil ventures
Emily McAteer, RiskMetrics Group, USA, Jamie Cerretti, Environment America, USA, and Saleem H. Ali, University of Vermont, USA

11. Environmental justice concerns with transnational mining operations: exploring the limitations of post-crisis community dialogues in Peru
Isabelle Anguelovski, Department of Urban Studies and Planning, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA

12. Indigenous people and mineral resource extraction in Russia: the case of diamonds
Susan A. Crate, Department of Environmental Science and Policy, George Mason University, USA, and Natalia Yakovleva, BRASS Research Centre, Cardiff University, UK

13. Conclusion
Saleem H. Ali, University of Vermont, USA

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