Falling Man

Falling Man

by Don DeLillo
2.8 19

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Overview

Falling Man by Don DeLillo

There is September 11 and then there are the days after, and finally the years.

Falling Man is a magnificent, essential novel about the event that defines turn-of-the-century America. It begins in the smoke and ash of the burning towers and tracks the aftermath of this global tremor in the intimate lives of a few people.

First there is Keith, walking out of the rubble into a life that he'd always imagined belonged to everyone but him. Then Lianne, his es-tranged wife, memory-haunted, trying to reconcile two versions of the same shadowy man. And their small son Justin, standing at the window, scanning the sky for more planes.

These are lives choreographed by loss, grief and the enormous force of history.

Brave and brilliant, Falling Man traces the way the events of September 11 have reconfigured our emotional landscape, our memory and our perception of the world. It is cathartic, beautiful, heartbreaking.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781416562078
Publisher: Scribner
Publication date: 05/15/2007
Sold by: SIMON & SCHUSTER
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 256
Sales rank: 352,888
File size: 2 MB

About the Author

Don DeLillo is the author of fifteen novels, including Zero K, Underworld, Falling Man, White Noise, and Libra. He has won the National Book Award, the PEN/Faulkner Award for Fiction, the Jerusalem Prize for his complete body of work, and the William Dean Howells Medal from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. In 2010, he was awarded the PEN/Saul Bellow Prize. His story collection The Angel Esmeralda was a finalist for the 2011 Story Prize and the PEN/Faulkner Award for Fiction.

Hometown:

Westchester County, New York

Date of Birth:

November 20, 1936

Place of Birth:

New York City

Education:

Fordham University, 1958

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Falling Man 2.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 19 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Don DeLillo has yet to disappoint me. Falling Man is just another perfect example why DeLillo is easily one of the top five novelists in contemporary America. DeLillo refuses to take the easy road by merely regurgitating the mass media frenzy that resulted from 9/11 instead, he tells the story through individuals and their varying forms of reaction and coping in the aftermath of the attacks. DeLillo, as seen in previous novels, reverts back to his focus on `images¿ with the ¿Falling Man¿ (a twin tower jumper in the 9/11 attacks caught on camera). No author is better equipped to deal with such an image readers have witnessed DeLillo¿s successful track record with the undertaking images in Libra¿s JFK Zapruder film, White Noise¿s ¿most photographed barn in America,¿ and video footage of the Texas Highway Killer in Underworld (just to name a few). Falling Man is no different. One of DeLillo¿s `knocks¿ over the years has been his lack of plot development. 9/11, however, becomes an ideal platform for DeLillo¿s disregard for plot. After the attacks, there is nothing left, only a numb reaction where plots do not belong. DeLillo delivers this stagnant period of mourning, confusion, and self-reflection to the reader with ease.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is a book for true lovers of fiction for the reader who seeks something beyond the ordinary. It is lean and muscular. Not an easy read, but deeply fulfilling, with passages of brilliance.
Franne More than 1 year ago
I couldn't stand the writing style. It was just too disjointed. Too many good books to read...don't waste your time with this one.
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mapearl More than 1 year ago
I read the actual written book and I was moved to read about survivors of 911. We have heard about the terrible deaths, we lived with the loss of so many american's on our own soil, but what happened to those who survived...this is the story told. I want to say that after 9 years, I fear that we are forgetting the terror we felt, the anger, and the pride of being an American...the flags on every automobile, in home windows, the country felt close. It is fading...and we must not let this happen. Never Forget!!!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Guest More than 1 year ago
If you've never read DeLillo you have one of two options: Either don't start reading him with this book, or don't start at all. For my money he's one of the most emotionally complex American writers alive, definately not for the casual reader. This is a very gripping book for those who read more than just the words on the page.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I picked up this book thinking that it would be a good fictional read about the complicated lives of a few 9/11 survivors. Having never read Delillo before, I cannot honestly say if his writing was worse than previous books or not. His writing style is very odd and turns one way, then another, and comes back again with no rhyme or reason. This could have been a fantastic book, but the author's writing style made me wish I never picked it up.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I've been an avid Delillo fan and advocate since the early 80s. Falling Man stands along with Cosmopolis as one of his two most unsatisfying efforts - at least for the reader. Characterization and language are weak, his two hallmarks. Without either, Falling Man is regrettably forgettable.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The events driving the novel are far more compelling than the characters. Although they are all somehow connected, their ramdom musings drag any semblance of continuity apart. Even DeLillo's gift for choppy, clever dialogue become tedious. If you have to have it, wait for the paperback, or better, the bargain table.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
No, the author didn't bother with a plot. What a waste of a book.
eak321 More than 1 year ago
After the tenth anniversary of the attacks on the World Trade Center, I decided to pick up my copy of FALLING MAN that I had lying on my bookshelf, waiting to be read. I thought it was timely and would be a fantastic read, given all the accolades the novel received. Unfortunately, FALLING MAN is basically a book of random thoughts. It's like being inside the head of someone with attention deficit disorder who changes from one topic to another so quickly that you can't understand what they're trying to say. They're giving you only pieces of the conversation that's going on inside their head. It was very hard to follow what was going on. To make it worse, the author uses generic pronouns like "he" and "she" as if we're supposed to know who he's talking about, when we don't even know the characters. I know there's a man with an estranged spouse and a kid. Other than that, I wasn't quite sure and, frankly, after 50 pages in, I didn't care. After the tenth anniversary of the attacks on the World Trade Center, I decided to pick up my copy of FALLING MAN that I had lying on my bookshelf, waiting to be read. I thought it was timely and would be a fantastic read, given all the accolades the novel received. Unfortunately, FALLING MAN is basically a book of random thoughts. It's like being inside the head of someone with attention deficit disorder who changes from one topic to another so quickly that you can't understand what they're trying to say. They're giving you only pieces of the conversation that's going on inside their head. It was very hard to follow what was going on. To make it worse, the author uses generic pronouns like "he" and "she" as if we're supposed to know who he's talking about, when we don't even know the characters. I know there's a man with an estranged spouse and a kid. He escapes the center of the attacks and goes straight to his ex-wife's house. Other than that, I wasn't quite sure and, frankly, after 50 pages in, I didn't care. If, after 50 pages, the book hasn't grabbed me, I doubt reading an additional 200 pages would have really made me appreciate or enjoy the novel any more, so I just gave up. FALLING MAN? More like FAILING MAN.
discoverygal More than 1 year ago
I found the book extremely confusing. You almost know the end before you've heard the first two chapters and after that it jumps back and forth in a jumble of times and characters.
Guest More than 1 year ago
You read the inside flap and you think, ok.. this is going to be tragic and moving and heartwrenching. And the 1st chapter set it all up.... and then..... the broken views, the inner chatter.. for me, it just wasnt what i had hoped it would be. It was rather disappointing, really. All the right intentions, just poor follow through in my opinion. Best parts of the book for me was the 1st and last chapter. Everything inbetween was forgetable.