Found Art: Discovering Beauty in Foreign Places

Found Art: Discovering Beauty in Foreign Places

by Leeana Tankersley

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780310561828
Publisher: Zondervan
Publication date: 06/14/2009
Sold by: HarperCollins Publishing
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 224
Sales rank: 656,522
File size: 691 KB
Age Range: 18 Years

About the Author

Leeana Tankersley is a native of San Diego who received her BS from Liberty University and her MA from West Virginia University. Leeana and her husband, Steve, live in Coronado, California, with their twins, Luke and Lane. Found Art is her first Book.

What People are Saying About This

From the Publisher

“Leeana’s story is extraordinary, and so is her storytelling ability. As I finished Found Art, I felt like I had made a friend and that together we had traveled long distances, both around the world and into a deeper understanding of what it means to be a woman of faith---many different kinds of faith. Her story is at once so foreign and so familiar, because the power of her writing is so compelling.” -- Shauna Niequist

Customer Reviews

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Found Art: Discovering Beauty in Foreign Places 4.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 7 reviews.
cemming on LibraryThing 26 days ago
An honest, thoughtful journey of the delicate relationship with self, Found Art is a book born of strange circumstance. Leeana Tankersley's memoir chronicles her whirlwind engagement to a Navy SEAL officer, the couples' brisk but memorable first married year stationed in Afghanistan at the brink of the gulf war, and ends with the shift to 'normal' life back in the U.S. ¿ or as regular as it gets for the wife of a SEAL during wartime.As she tries to process the bleary pace of navy life and reassess her goals, Leeana is forced to address her personal roadblocks. Loneliness, social anxiety, how God works, the existence of war, constant fear of loss, self-confidence, and death are all issues Tankersley wrestles privately, all smeared across these pages.An easy read with some profound messaging, Found Art has some overworked prose where Tankersley mimics a freshman angling for extra points, though she's not lacking in sincerity. Her voice is calm and seasoned, just not quite settled or secure with itself. Which, at its core, is what she addresses here: coming to terms with oneself is a lifelong process.
WorldReader1111 More than 1 year ago
A pleasant surprise, this one. I bought 'Found Art' at a thrift store, on a total whim, being completely unfamiliar with it or its author -- but my choice proved wise, for I was treated to a truly great read. The book grabbed me right from the start, with its rich, fluid tone, interesting premise, and tasteful pacing. From there, the book only got better, as the author employed a consistently eloquent, perceptive writing style; paired with a soulful intelligence, vivid descriptions, and more than a little humor, the text read, for me, both easily and wonderfully. Even the formatting is above-average. Thus, from a literary standpoint alone, 'Found' is, in my view, a complete, polished piece of work. As for the content itself, the book continues to shine, being both substantial and meaningful, as well as multidimensional. There's a lot here, in these brief 200 pages: a human story, of one woman's profound growth by way of outwardly difficult circumstances; a travelogue, offering much firsthand geographical and cultural descriptions of Bahrain and the general Middle Eastern experience; and even a love story, too. Plus, woven through all these threads, there are the author's regular spiritual commentaries, which, despite their marked Judaeo-Christian orientation, remain universally relevant in essence, as to yield much valuable, practical wisdom. Indeed, there is much to be learned from Mrs. Tankersley's year abroad (and the trials of her return), and the book conveys those life-lessons coherently and enjoyably. Ultimately, I finished 'Found' feeling expanded, entertained, and heartened (and a little heartbroken, too), as few books achieve. Thus, I must grant the rare five stars. My sincere thanks goes out to this book's author, subjects, and publisher. I am grateful for, and have benefited from, your work. * * * Some notable quotes from 'Found Art' (of many, as it were): "The risk of sitting in silence [...] is what we will find there." -- p.56 "[...] Beauty is not a luxury in life but a necessity." -- p.63 "I try to believe what I know to be true, that God is often waiting for us in the least-expected, least-desired places -- fear, grief, loneliness, confusion, forgiveness, shame [...]" -- p.124 "Over time, I learned I had gained _and_ lost. Any season of life worth its salt, any season that really transforms us, will bring both in equal measure." -- p.144 "Pain, like no other place perhaps, is where our art is born, where our stories are written, our canvases brushed, our scores composed. Though we so often want to deny the discomfort, suffering is one of the few things that can lead us to the place where we find the God we so desperately long for." -- p.167 "Great power resides in a voice that sings for no audience and searches for no approval [...]" -- p.188
Prstn More than 1 year ago
Pain. Pilgrimage. Presence.  Leanna explores each of these as she shares the transformative first years of her marriage to a Navy SEAL. As she allows God to find her, speak to her, and walk with her we discover the importance of the three word phrase, "Let it go." God asks us to let go. Of people or things we consider most precious. Of loss. Of wounds that scar us deeply. Of suffering.  In Found Art, Leanna shares various ways we can move from being wounded and broken to being healed and made whole. She captures and shares the beauty that God brings from our brokenness.  A must read if you are looking for healing. For things to make sense. For peace in a messed up life.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Found Art is so artfully written, it is a masterpiece itself. As a former military wife myself, I appreciate the author's opening her world to the rest of us in this memoir. Not only is the content powerful, but her writing style is so engaging, taking the reader on a rollercoaster ride from laughter to tears. This is not just an ordinary retelling of one's story. This is a literary work, a tapestry of words. The tangle of experiences and emotions are woven into something absolutely beautiful, and transformative.
NikoleHahn More than 1 year ago
Found Art by Leeana Tankersley Unexpectedly moved, brought to the depths of my own emotional turmoil, and guided by her words, I can almost envision Leeana's moments as she moves from her life before Steve, a U.S. Navy SEAL, to her new married life in the Bahrain-200 miles from Iraq during Operation Freedom. Found Art explores the concept that life is a collage of experiences. She moves through grief and healing and coralates this to art. "Life is most certainly a collage of experience, with all the scraps and secondhand oddments overlaying one another. On a few special occasions we are able to glimpse the art-in-the-making-the found art-that is created from those throwaway bits." Leeana explains in the Introduction called, A Collage. She goes further and says, "To that end, I invite you to look at this entire book as a collage of sorts: A handwritten note from Kuwait; a braid of fringe from a Persian rug; an original poem; a bit of basting thread; a swatch of black silk from a borrowed abaya; a mesquite leaf; and a Navy SEAL Trident; a reciept from the Russian-Georgian restaurant on Louisiana Street." The book is gently dog-eared. A librarian might gasp in horror because I have defiled this beautiful, hard cover book, but in truth, I have marked passages to remember when writing this review. I did not expect to fall in love with this story. There are many nuggets of wisdom in each chapter. She has so many emotional struggles-dealing with being a part-time wife (kind of goes with the territory of being a military wife), grief at losing loved ones, the feeling of displacement and isolation in a foreign country, being married, dealing with the unhealed wounds of the past, and the lovely moments in between the chaos. I have many favorite moments in this book. Leeana describes them all so perfectly. I can almost feel the grit of the wind storms on my skin and on my teeth, the taste of the syrupy sweet tea from tiny painted shot-sized glasses, and I can envision the women cloaked in black abayas. I loved how she made connections in that foreign place and found beauty in it. The favorite rug shop in the souq (a commercial quarter in an arab city), and Yousef who lets them borrow rugs to make sure they buy a rug that fits them; a rug they can pass down to their children. He makes them tea while they take off their shoes and bury their toes in the wool of the handmade rugs. They sit and talk together. In spite of her feelings of not belonging and her spiritual struggles, she managed to make some priceless friendships. I wish I could have sat with them on that rug in Bahrain. I wish I could have drank the sweet tea and spoken to Yousef, too. Perhaps it is my own desire to belong-the desire to create roots somewhere. "Peace and breath were plenty in these moments with Yousef in the souq. Time slipped utterly away, as did any of the world's worries. We took our shoes off and pushed our bare toes down into the plush wool of the carpets as we would into sand on the beach. Sometimes we stretched out across a pile of rugs in the corner and talked and laughed as we ate our shawarmas. Sometimes, we just listened as Yousef paraded a few o fhis most prized rugs in front of us, introducing them as if they were friends and telling us their stories," writes Leeana. There were moments in her book where she discussed her own preoccupation with her own failings. To read more go to www.thehahnhuntinglodge.com
Jocelyn_Green More than 1 year ago
Found Art is so artfully written, it is a masterpiece itself. As a former military wife myself, I appreciate the author's opening her world to the rest of us in this memoir. Not only is the content powerful, but her writing style is so engaging, taking the reader on a rollercoaster ride from laughter to tears. This is not just an ordinary retelling of one's story. This is a literary work, a tapestry of words. The tangle of experiences and emotions are woven into something absolutely beautiful, and transformative.
Christine_Emming More than 1 year ago
An honest, thoughtful journal of the delicate relationship with self, Found Art is a book born of strange circumstance. Leeana Tankersley's memoir chronicles her whirlwind engagement to a Navy SEAL officer, the couples' brisk but memorable first married year stationed in Afghanistan at the brink of the gulf war, and ends with the shift to 'normal' life back in the U.S. - or as regular as it gets for the wife of a SEAL during wartime. As she tries to process the bleary pace of navy life and reassess her goals, Leeana is forced to address her personal roadblocks. Loneliness, social anxiety, how God works, the existence of war, constant fear of loss, self-confidence, and death are all issues Tankersley wrestles privately, all smeared across these pages. An easy read with some profound messaging, Found Art has some overworked prose where Tankersley mimics a freshman angling for extra points, though she's not lacking in sincerity. Her voice is calm and seasoned, just not quite settled or secure with itself. Which, at its core, is what she addresses here: coming to terms with oneself is a lifelong process.