Hacking the Atom

Hacking the Atom

by Steven B. Krivit

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Overview

Hacking the Atom by Steven B. Krivit

Steven B. Krivit's Explorations in Nuclear Research three-book series (Hacking the Atom, Fusion Fiasco, Lost History) describes the emergence of a new field of science, one that bridges chemistry and physics. The books give readers an understanding of low-energy nuclear reaction (LENR) research and its history and provide a rare behind-the-scenes look at the players and personalities involved. The books present the results of in-depth historical research and draw on formerly inaccessible archives to describe what occurred in the research that has been mistakenly called "cold fusion."

Hacking the Atom, written for scientists and non-scientists alike, covers the period from 1990 to 2015 and explains how changes to atomic nuclei can occur with low-energy methods. The book reveals the hidden story of how the science initially and erroneously called "cold fusion" continued to progress slowly but incrementally after its near-death in 1989. The book shows that 100 years of chemistry and physics is not wrong but is incomplete and that there is something new and exciting in the physical sciences.

Hacking the Atom:
• Explains why LENRs may lead to a new form of nuclear energy without harmful radiation.
• Shows why LENRs are not based on "cold fusion" but are instead based on weak interactions.
• Gives examples of experimental evidence of isotopic shifts and elemental transmutations that confirm LENRs as real nuclear reactions.
• Provides an easy-to-follow tutorial on the Widom-Larsen theory, a plausible explanation — which does not violate laws of physics — for the experimental observations.
• Provides clear explanations for the lack of dangerous radiation from the experiments.
• Explains the basis for the stigma as well as the root causes for the lack of progress in the field.
• Provides case studies of surprising behavior by scientists, ranging from zealotry to outright fraud.
• Does it all in an easy-to-follow chronology and an engaging, page-turning narrative.

Product Details

BN ID: 2940153963259
Publisher: Steven B. Krivit
Publication date: 01/10/2017
Series: Explorations in Nuclear Research
Sold by: Smashwords
Format: NOOK Book
File size: 5 MB

About the Author

Steven B. Krivit began his science journalism career focusing on low-energy nuclear reactions (LENR) in 2000. He initially reported on the work of credentialed scientists who claimed that they had experimental evidence of "cold fusion." He took those scientists at their word. However, by 2008, Krivit had identified eight experimental facts that disproved their erroneous "cold fusion" hypothesis. Krivit's article on LENR, published by Scientific American on Dec. 7, 2016, provides a concise overview of the topic. Krivit is the publisher and senior editor of New Energy Times. He is a recognized subject-matter expert on LENR research and an author, investigative science journalist, editor, photographer, and international speaker. His is an author or editor of seven books about or including chapters on LENR. Scientific Publications and Encyclopedias Steven B. Krivit is the leading author of review articles and encyclopedia chapters and books about LENRs. He was invited to write and edit for the Royal Society of Chemistry, Elsevier and John Wiley & Sons. He was an editor for the American Chemical Society 2008 and 2009 technical reference books on LENRs and editor-in-chief for the 2011 Wiley Nuclear Energy Encyclopedia. His most recent books are the three-volume Explorations in Nuclear Science series; Hacking the Atom (Vol. 1), Fusion Fiasco (Vol. 2), and Lost History (Vol. 3). In the Media Krivit and/or New Energy Times have been quoted or cited on LENRs, in the U.S. and internationally, by many media outlets and Krivit has appeared on television and radio.

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Hacking the Atom 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Grumpystiltskin More than 1 year ago
Nicely written! Krivit has done a huge amount of exploration in the field of LENR which was initially confused with a form of fusion, cold fusion. The reaction has a lot of potential to be economically relevant. THere are good companies working on it. SOme in stealth. Some publicly. Krivit's weakness is that he is a journalist, a man of words, not science. So he gets totally hung up on nomenclature and is terribly offended by anyone who still want's to call the reaction "cold fusion". He also plays Gotcha when he thinks he caught some scientists being biased and the book suffers a bit by occasional notes of inaccurate and even nasty criticism. Krivit is very enamored by the Widom-Larsen theory and unhappy with other understandings. However the value of the work is incredible, both scientifically and historically. It is very well written.