Handmade Houseplants: Remarkably Realistic Plants You Can Make with Paper

Handmade Houseplants: Remarkably Realistic Plants You Can Make with Paper

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781604698190
Publisher: Timber Press, Incorporated
Publication date: 09/04/2018
Pages: 300
Sales rank: 377,177
Product dimensions: 8.00(w) x 9.00(h) x (d)

About the Author

Corrie Beth Hogg is the art and craft director for world-renowned event-design company David Stark Design and Production. With Stark, she has created work seen in Martha Stewart Living, The New York Times, Better Homes and Gardens, Vogue.com, InStyle.com, and more. An ardent student of nature, Hogg renders her favorite plants in paper with whimsy and careful craftsmanship. Her creations have appeared in The House That Lars Built, Design*Sponge, and Wallpaper* among others.

Read an Excerpt

My love for nature and my passion for making art are intrinsically intertwined—and they always have been. As a child growing up near the Gulf Islands National Seashore in southern Mississippi, I spent many afternoons canoeing in the bayous and wandering trails in the woods. I’d construct giant dream catchers by pulling up ivy from our garden, twisting the vines together, and adding whatever treasures I found that day: feathers, shells, or acorn caps. I started art lessons at just eight years old, planning my artistic future at a young age. They led me to study painting at Memphis College of Art, before I moved to New York City to follow my art world dreams.

Although I love urban life, I took a break from the city a few years ago to work for a season on an organic farm in northern California. My tent dwelling allowed me to wake with the dawn each morning, and my days orbited around plants. I picked basil in the morning, weeded arugula after lunch, and patiently waited for tomatoes to ripen day after day. My favorite moments were once again merging nature and art together by creating mixed floral bouquets for the farmers’ market and arranging the farm stand’s vegetables in an appealing way. I brought that state of mind back with me to Brooklyn, where I currently live and work just a few blocks from the Brooklyn Botanic Garden and Prospect Park, both of which I visit nearly every weekend. These outdoor spaces are invaluable to me for inspiration, fresh air, and a much-needed respite from city life. They’re also where I discovered many of the plants that you’ll find in this book.

Nature fuels and inspires me . . . whether that means backpacking the Appalachian Trail, taking a stroll in a park, or even just finding some small corner of my apartment where a few houseplants can survive. I began making paper plants because I wanted a fiddle-leaf fig tree in my windowless living room. From their verdant hues to their whimsical gestures, these paper creations give me the same joy as my live plants. Though the paper is temporary, especially when compared to a plastic plant, I believe the care and attention I put into each leaf while creating the plant makes me appreciate it even more.

Paper wasn’t always my medium of choice. For many years, I made paintings, collages, and fabric sculptures. I began working with paper at the request of my longtime mentor and friend, David Stark, who wrote the foreword for this book. David’s always known and trusted that I was a person who could make things. Even if I didn’t know how, he knew I’d figure it out. I’ve worked at his company, David Stark Design and Production, for many years, and it’s become my second home. My job gives me endless opportunities to be ambitiously creative, and I never know what I’ll be inspired to make from one day to the next. This exciting variety at work gives me freedom to discover new ideas in my own studio, sparking inspiration—like my current obsession, paper plants!

From my very first paper challenge of building a life-size baby giraffe out of kraft paper, to all the variations of flowers, birds, butterflies, and more, paper found its way into my heart and my own studio. I love to revel in the wonders of taking the ordinary, like paper, wire, and a bit of paint, to create an object that I truly cherish. As you craft your own versions of the projects in this book, I hope you start (or continue) your artistic journey in this manner. Celebrate the pure pleasure in the act of creating something new with your hands. Not every leaf needs to be perfect, not every cut or mark needs to be made exactly the same. Enjoy the process! Enjoy making these plants for yourself, for your home, or as a gift for a friend.

In this book you will find detailed instructions for making thirty of my favorite plants, plus five bonus projects demonstrating how to showcase the plants in artful ways. Many of these plants will probably be familiar, while some may seem more exotic. I chose Pilea peperomioides and fiddle-leaf figs because they are popular, and also because the real plants are difficult to come by or hard to take care of. Sometimes, I chose to make a plant simply because I love the color or the shape of the leaves. No matter the reason or inspiration, the great news is that paper plants don’t require you to have a green thumb or a sunlit home. They simply require a set of willing hands, a few crafting supplies, and a good pair of sharp scissors!

Many projects in this book are easy and can be done in an afternoon, but a few may take a weekend to make. In most of the projects I’ve tried to closely mimic the real plant. But whether your muse is a realistic version or something cut from your own imagination, let yourself experiment and play. After all, creation at its core is whatever inspires, intrigues, or compels you. Are you ready to craft your own indoor garden? Let’s make some paper plants!

Table of Contents

Foreword 8

Introduction 10

Getting Started 14

Tools & Materials 15

Skills & Techniques 22

The Paper Plants

Heartleaf Philodendron 70

Pilea peperomioides 80

Watermelon Peperomia 86

Pitcher Plant 90

African Mask Plant 94

White Caladium 100

Calathea orbifolia 106

Pink Cordyline 117

Angel Wing Begonia $

Swiss Cheese Vine 122

Rattlesnake Plant 128

Arrowhead Vine 132

Fishbone Cactus 138

Pink Polka Dot Plant 142

Swallowtail Plant 148

Variegated Lady Palm 150

Never-Never Plant 158

Inch Plant $

Philodendron billietioe $

Sassafras Seedlings $

Alocasia infernalis 178

Christmas Cactus 184

Rex Begonia Vine 190

Peruvian Maidenhair Fern 198

Sweet Potato Vine 202

Spiral Ginger 208

Oxalis 214

Monstera deliciosa 220

Fiddle-Leaf Fig 220

Tapioca Plant 234

Bonus Projects

Place Cards & Centerpiece 242

Porcelain Berry Vine Garland 244

Mixed Planters 248

Trellis Art 248

Cloches 250

Templates & Painting Patterns 252

Resources 288

Acknowledgments 290

Index 299

Customer Reviews

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Handmade Houseplants: Remarkably Realistic Plants You Can Make with Paper 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Theologiczero More than 1 year ago
These paper plants look fantastic when done! The author does a good job giving plenty of easy to understand directions, color pictures to follow, and finished project pictures as well. Some of the plants are more difficult than others so they will take practice to do correctly. Plus, if you are not good at painting, they may still suffer a little bit and not come out as good as the author's, but she does do a good job showing you how to paint the "plants" to mimic their live counterparts. Like most books that show how to create crafts, she gives a summary of the tools that you need and why you will need them in the beginning. She also explains why certain materials are better for certain projects so you end up with the best results. She even puts in an "oops" page and how to fix common mistakes. The book is filled with templates as well so you get the perfect cut for whatever plant you are working on. Plus the book as an index so you can go where you need without having to go through all the pages searching for a specific set of instructions. Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for giving me an advanced copy to read. All opinions are my own.
Mel_Poole More than 1 year ago
Creating paper plants is one of my favorite crafts, so I was excited to see this book. One thing that separates this from others, is that it focuses on greenery, instead of flowers. There aren't a lot of books out there that cover this aspect. I found the crafts to be fairly simple and easy for beginners to create. I also loved the detailed instructions and tips.
junelaurel More than 1 year ago
What a brilliant idea--plants that I can create, but not immediately kill! Instructions are easy to follow, and the results are just lovely. Corrie Beth Hogg is a genius.
diane92345 More than 1 year ago
Handmade Houseplants shows a beautiful use of paper and your creativity to liven up your home or office. Using various painting, cutting and gluing skills, the author gives step-by-step instructions for 30 different plants. From carnivorous to poisonous to cactus, most plants you have heard of and a few you haven’t are included. After the reader has done a few of the step-by-step plants, the author includes five more advanced projects like place settings, centerpieces, table/mantle runners and a trellis that is adorable. The finished projects vary in size from 4” to 4 feet wide or tall. The initial supplies needed can be acquired cheaply assuming you already have a glue gun, scissors, iron, wire clippers and needle nose pliers. The book includes a resources page with inexpensive art websites like dickblick.com. These projects are gorgeous and look totally Instagram or blog ready. If you are tired of making origami frogs, this is a great next step in your paper odyssey. 4 stars! Thanks to the publisher, Timber Press, and NetGalley for an advanced copy.