Heaven's Net Is Wide (Tales of the Otori Series #5)

Heaven's Net Is Wide (Tales of the Otori Series #5)

by Lian Hearn

Paperback(Reprint)

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Overview


The new beginning and the grand finale of Lian Hearn's celebrated Tales of the Otori is "rivetingly elegant" (Washington Post). Don't miss the related series, The Tale of Shikanoko.


Heaven's Net Is Wide is the prequel that reveals the full story of Lord Otori Shigeru—the figure who has presided in both life and death over the entire series, the man who represents the true spirit of the Otori Clan. The first and the last tale, it introduces readers to the strange and beautiful world of the Otori and closes the circle where it opened in Across the Nightingale Floor. Set in a mythical, medieval Japan, this epic historical fantasy of revenge and betrayal, honor and loyalty, beauty, passion, and the overwhelming power of love, has enthralled millions of readers the world over—and now, with the cycle complete, its audience will only continue to grow.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781594483325
Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date: 09/02/2008
Series: Tales of the Otori Series , #5
Edition description: Reprint
Pages: 576
Sales rank: 309,467
Product dimensions: 5.10(w) x 7.90(h) x 1.30(d)
Lexile: 940L (what's this?)
Age Range: 18 Years

About the Author

Lian Hearn is the pseudonym for the writer Gillian Rubinstein, currently living in Australia, who has a lifelong interest in Japan, has lived there, and speaks Japanese. All five books in the Tales of the Otori series—Across the Nightingale Floor, Grass for His Pillow, Brilliance of the Moon, The Harsh Cry of the Heron, and Heaven's Net is Wide—are available now from Riverhead Books. Don't miss the related series, The Tale of Shikanoko.

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Heaven's Net Is Wide (Tales of the Otori Series #5) 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 27 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
LOVE THIS BOOK!!! Lian Hearn is one of the most important author in the century!! Anybody who have read Harry Pottery or Lord of the Rings simply must read the entire series of the tales of the Otori. You will submerged yourself into a world full magic, romance, action, adventure, and tragedy. A beautiful story set in Medieval Japan. This Books is definitely a most have!
Hill_Ravens More than 1 year ago
Heaven's Net is Wide: The first book in the Otori series. The book starts with the start up bringing of Shigeru and the original alliances between the clans. It winds through the losses and challenges Shigeru faced and what helped build his character and win the love of his people, which is a strong theme through the other books. There are wars, bargains, hostages, love and new life. Several religions vie for supremacy and are the cause of many of deaths and abuses in the book. A great story about how the characters in the series started and were drawn together through many fateful decisions. A
cestovatela on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Heaven's Net is Wide is the prequel to Lian Hearn's Tales of the Otori trilogy. Set in a fictional version of medieval Japan, it tells the story of Lord Otori Shigeru's quest to rescue his once-powerful clan from the hands of his vacillating father and grasping uncles. Although the book has all the intrigues of a spy drama, the author, Lian Hearn says it is really about "human beings reaching for power" and "reacting to a society that restricts their behavior, telling them who to be and what to do." That's what makes these books so fascinating even though the writing isn't perfect. Because this book tells the story that leads up to the action-packed main trilogy, not a lot actually happens -- aside from a lot of plotting, scheming and waiting. The first half of the book, telling Lord Otori's training and coming of age, moves along at a good clip, but after that, it feels as if the author isn't quite sure what to do next. That didn't stop me from waking up wondering what would happen to each of the main characters though. The mix of political, romantic and sexual intrigue was enough to keep me going and make me sorry when the book was over.Even though this is a prequel and chronologically first in the series, it's better to read this after you've finished the original trilogy. It is designed to answer readers' lingering questions about the characters' backstories, and uncovering the surprise details of your favorite character's life is what makes it interesting. Readers who haven't completed, or at least read a part of, the original trilogy might grow bored. If this review intrigues you, the trilogy is worth checking out. Historical fiction replete with large scale battles and one-on-one martial arts duels is not my usual cup of tea, but this series pulled me in from the start. Lian Hearn excels at crafting strong female characters who retain -- and are empowered by -- their unique feminine qualities. But this isn't just "chick lit." Readers of both sexes will appreciate the balance of political intrigue, sword fights, romance and sex (not explicit).
elbakerone on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Heaven's Net is Wide is Lian Hearn's stunning prequel to the Tales of the Otori saga. This book tells the story of young Otori Shigeru and his rise to become Lord Otori, head of his clan, amidst triumphs and tragedy, friendship, love and betrayal. Hearn's alternate historical version of Japan is as beautiful as ever and her writing adds depth and detail to the picturesque scenery carried through all her novels. I really enjoyed how Hearn stayed true to her multi-character storytelling. Though the story was Shigeru's, I appreciated the chapters devoted to mysterious Tribe members Muto Kenji and Muto Shizuka, and also the background of Lady Maruyama Naomi and the members of the Hidden. Heaven's Net is Wide would be a great starting place for those new to the Otori series, but it is equally enjoyable as the final book in the Tales - bringing the story full circle to where it all began.
traveltrish on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I too found this book difficult because it was a prequel and written last. Would have loved to have read it first and think that it leads in beautifully to Across the Nightingale Floor which I absolutely adored.
Capfox on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Prequels are hard to pull off, being that the ideal one would have both a good story on its own and some call towards knowledge from the already published books. This one does a pretty good job of playing off the Tales of the Otori, with nice little details in there that tie to plot in the trilogy proper, but with a good story of its own.This book's lead character is Otori Shigeru, the mentor character from Across the Nightingale Floor, from his late childhood up through when the trilogy begins. Much of this is quite interesting: how he became the person he is in the trilogy is well charted and described - how he learns about farming, his interest in the Tribe, his training with Matsuda, his relations with his family, etc. Either Hearn planned this beforehand and had it in mind when she wrote the character, or she came up with a lot of plausible stuff in retrospect. The historical sequences that you know must have occuThe writing style is very much the same as the other books, with the evocative feel without too much detail that Hearn excelled at. I also liked the return of the more female viewpoint that one of the secondary characters, Akane, gave. These do feel like people, and I like that.The main problem I have is one of pacing, really: the pacing at the beginning and at the end feel quite different, and there's a big rush towards the end, it feels like, to get it to the beginning of the trilogy. But I can see why she did it; the book probably would have suffered with the extra couple hundred pages it would have taken to get there.I don't think I'd start with this book, still, because I liked the feel in Across the Nightingale Floor of a world that works without you knowing all of the components directly, but it's definitely worth reading if you like the rest of the series. I enjoyed it, and I'm glad it ended well (or began well, as you like).
revslick on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
One of the best Samurai/Ninja/historical fiction novels around. It is not cheesy nor too exasperating. Another bonus in the mix is a tribe called 'The Hidden' which are IMHO the closest to the early followers of 'The Way' as I've read. If you've never read any of the Otori series this is a great start!
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Wow...Lian Hearn really lost it in this book. The author clearly lost sight of the true purpose of the Otori series. While the Trilogy and subsequent Sequel were amazing, this prequel fell way too short. It was good to see the background of Otori Shigeru and the trouble that he faced throughout his childhood, but I feel that this novel lacks the action and and fast pace that the other novels employed. So basically, if you're into gushy love novels about seperated lovers then this book is for you. But if you're not, then I'd recommend just skipping over this book and not letting yourself be dissapointed.