Heroine's Journey

Heroine's Journey

by Sarah Kuhn

Paperback

$13.50 $15.00 Save 10% Current price is $13.5, Original price is $15. You Save 10%.
View All Available Formats & Editions
Want it by Monday, November 26 Order now and choose Expedited Shipping during checkout.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780756414412
Publisher: DAW
Publication date: 07/03/2018
Series: Heroine Complex Series , #3
Pages: 384
Sales rank: 129,238
Product dimensions: 5.10(w) x 7.90(h) x 1.00(d)

About the Author

Sarah Kuhn is the author of the Heroine books--starring Asian American superheroines--for DAW Books. She also wrote the romantic comedy novella One Con Glory, which is in development as a feature film. Her articles and essays on such topics as geek girl culture, comic book continuity, and Sailor Moon cosplay have appeared in multiple publications. In 2011, she was selected as a finalist for the CAPE (Coalition of Asian Pacifics in Entertainment) New Writers Award.

Read an Excerpt

Chapter One
(Continues…)



Excerpted from "Heroine's Journey"
by .
Copyright © 2019 Sarah Kuhn.
Excerpted by permission of DAW.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

Heroine's Journey 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
ReadingLlama 12 months ago
This is the third book in the Heroine Complex series, centered on three female Asian superheroes in San Francisco. While you could perhaps read this book as a standalone, don’t. Go back and read the first two – they are excellent! It’s been a few years since the last book, and Bea is now in her twenties. After repeatedly being denied a chance to join her sister Evie and her best friend Aveda’s super hero team, Bea’s pulled away from most of the daily grind of HQ and now works at a book shop. After helping Evie and Aveda end a particularly odd demon attack, Bea is finally allowed to be a superhero-in-training, with Aveda as her self-appointed mentor. But being a superhero isn’t everything she’s dreamed it would be, and she starts fearing that Evie’s criticism of her – that she flits around to whatever’s shiny, abandoning whatever she’s currently doing – has more merit than she wants to admit. The demon attacks this time seem different, and Bea soon becomes convinced that their mother, supposedly dead for a decade, is alive and trapped in a demon dimension. Bea and Evie’s relationship is complicated. After their mom’s death, their dad left, leaving twenty-something Evie to raise tween Bea by herself while also going through graduate school. Evie – partly because of her emotion-fuelled fire powers and partly because she was too busy with school, work, and Bea – never had the full-on breakdown Bea had, going from queen bee to goth, with only her friend Sam staying by her side, mostly because he was the only one who didn’t seem to pity her. When Bea suddenly starts receiving Otherworldy messages from her mom, she’s convinced it’s the way to fix things – the empty hole that she’s felt has been missing in herself, and everything that’s gone wrong between her and Evie. I think one of my main issues with the book is that it rubs places I’m especially raw – I lost my mom when I was around the same age as Bea. She strikes me as very young and very self-centered at the start of the book. It’s kinda weird, because it was what I was really worried about with Aveda’s novel, but I found her a lot more sympathetic from the get-go than Bea. She’s also ridiculously impulsive and gets bored quickly, dropping her new interests (and relationships) as quickly as she picks them up. What I loved about her, though, is her hopefulness, her habit of making posterboards covered in glitter to convince Evie of things, and the obvious love she has for her friends and family. To me, this book felt darker than the first two. Though it’s still chock full of humor (alas, though, no cupcake demons), much of it focuses on pretty heavy topics, like the fraught relationship between the sisters, which Bea attributes to their mom’s death. On top of that, Bea’s superhero power – being able to influence the feelings of people around her – has had a sudden and unexpected upgrade. Now, she can implant thoughts into other people’s heads, Jedi-style – and with that comes even more ethical concerns. Bea doesn’t always make the best choices, which was extremely relatable for me. What child – even an adult child – wouldn’t do anything within their power to get their mom back? Overall, I’m delighted that, at the end of this trilogy, it’s circled back around to one of the defining conflicts of the first book – Evie and Bea’s relationship. I was so pleased to find out that there will be more books in the series, and I’ll definitely be picking them up!
Sailon 12 months ago
Fun, fantastical world infused with humor, heart and action! Nothing like jumping into a series at the very last book, but that is exactly what I did with Heroine’s Journey. For most series, that would be disastrous, BUT for Heroine Complex, jumping in at Heroine’s Journey just made me want to one click the first two book in this series immediately! To say I enjoyed it would be an understatement. I found Heroine’s Journey to be bundle of snarky, quirky, action intense FUN! Don’t get me wrong, for all that fun to work Kuhn rocked character development, strong world building and plot and also heartfelt moments that instantly connected and engaged me, the reader. My only regret was not seizing this series from the start. I highly recommend this gem of a read and series. I received this ARC copy of Heroine's Journey from Berkley Publishing Group - Daw. This is my honest and voluntary review.