How I Killed Pluto and Why It Had It Coming

How I Killed Pluto and Why It Had It Coming

by Mike Brown
4.3 40

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How I Killed Pluto and Why It Had It Coming 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 40 reviews.
CFHinLA More than 1 year ago
I thoroughly enjoyed this book. Just the right amount of science, intrigue, humor, drama and a healthy dose life, love and family. It was a nice departure from the more dry astronomy books I've read lately. I would recommend it to anyone looking for some science mixed in with fun. @ Pbaum: You make valid points about some of the errors in the book (Thor being one) but you must consider who the target audience is for this book. This isn't a scientific draft, this is a book that laymen and older children can read and actually grasp. If the title and cover art didn't get that accross to you I don't know what would. Lastly, when you reference Keck not being the largest telescope, you are correct but with a caveat. You fail to mention that at the time Mike Brown made his discoveries Keck WAS the largest telescope(s). The GTC didn't come on line until July 2009, almost five years after the discoveries were made. You're splitting hairs where it isn't necessary.
TheLiteraryPhoenix 19 days ago
I don’t usually go looking for memoirs. And I definitely don’t seek out science books. For as fascinated as I am by science fiction, reading actual scientific fact usually bores me. I want adventure! I want the high seas and forbidden magic! Something! The fact that How I Killed Pluto and Why It Had It Coming landed on my TBR at all was uncanny – the fact that it survived four years on my TBR without being cut is a miracle. I’m really glad it did, because I found this book informative and fascinating. In short, this is the story of Mike Brown and his journey to discover Eris (the “tenth planet”) which eventually led to the demotion of Pluto. He explains the procedure behind using telescopes and searching for “wanderers” in the sky with enough to detail to enlighten the uneducated reader (me) but not so much that it’s tedious. Mix in the story of his marriage and first child, and this was an easy read. It’s also a bit embarrassing, but I learned way more about astronomy from this book than I did from my high school and college science classes. This book was added to my TBR because I like Pluto. It was a good planet. There was a Disney dog involved. It was sad and far away and needed loving. After listening to this book, I’m no longer bitter about the demotion, not even nostalgic… not really. Brown presents his case pretty well here, and he makes it interesting. There’s even a little bit of drama with a stolen discovery to add a dramatic twist. How many memoirs actually have a nemesis? It was great. If you’re interested in astronomy at all, Brown describes the tangled conundrum that is the definition of “planet.” the various bodies in our solar system, and even the process of naming a planet (there are rules!). It was all laid out in an interesting way, and doubly good as the narrator did a particularly excellent job making the reading engaging. I would definitely recommend this book to anyone still sore about Pluto, interested in astronomy, or just curious for a great real life tale involving planets and toddlers. Also, just a thought, this would make a decent movie. Tom Hanks could play Mike Brown.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Mike shares a compelling tale of scientic discovery and fatherhood. Best book I have read in while!
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Hai. I gtg go eat.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Can u tell people to come and talk here from the other zomie book?
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I dont think theyll listen to me....
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Sits silently.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Okay ill be back then!! *disappearz*
IneffableInexorable More than 1 year ago
This here was a fun, easy read, serving as both a memoir and informative on the situation surrounding Pluto.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Never mind
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Mads_S More than 1 year ago
In How I Killed Pluto and Why It Had It Coming, author Mike Brown tells readers about the solar system, a topic that is a usually extremely boring subject matter. However, Brown manages to insert his own person experiences into the book which makes it an interesting yet informing read. Normally, science fictions novels are like a textbook with only facts and definitions. How I Killed Pluto and Why It Had It Coming was so interesting that at times I forgot I was actually reading a science fiction novel! What makes it such an interesting book is that while learning about topics such as the Kuiper belt and the dwarf planets, Brown also tells readers about what was going on in his life at the time of these discoveries. Learning about him finding his wife and having his first child really makes the whole book more interesting for readers. Not to mention that fact that Brown is actually quite hilarious! Another thing that makes How I Killed Pluto and Why It Had It Coming a worthwhile read is how we can now associate a man with the death of our well loved ex-planet, Pluto. I started this book for one reason- my science book project. I never thought I would enjoy reading this book as much as I did. I would recommend it to anyone, even people not remotely interested in the solar system!
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