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Imperial Leather: Race, Gender and Sexuality in the Colonial Contest
     

Imperial Leather: Race, Gender and Sexuality in the Colonial Contest

by Anne P. McClintock
 
An exploration of the relationships between race, gender, and class, and what made these categories fundamental to Western modernity. This digital edition was derived from ACLS Humanities E-Book's online version of the same title.

Overview

An exploration of the relationships between race, gender, and class, and what made these categories fundamental to Western modernity. This digital edition was derived from ACLS Humanities E-Book's online version of the same title.

Editorial Reviews

Postmodern Culture, Volume 6, Number 3, May 1996 - Anjali Arondekar
McClintock's collection of essays wrestles with situating and balancing the problematic variables of race, class, and gender in readings of the colonial context within a range of hermeneutical discourses. (...) Race, gender, and class, she argues, are to be called "articulated categories" that "are not distinct realms of experience, existing in splendid isolation from each other."
American Historical Review, Vol. 103, No. 1, February 1998 - Mrinalini Sinha
This book by Anne McClintock is an ambitious addition to recent scholarship on empire gender and sexuality. It is magisterial in its scope, ranging from Victorian Britain and colonial South Africa to post- 1948 South Africa. McClintock examines a variety of historical materials including photography, diaries, ethnographies, imperial novels, oral histories, soap advertisements, and performance poetry.
Journal of British Studies, Vol. 34, No. 4, October 1999 - Luise White
Anne McClintock's col- lection of essays reveals the subtle terrains and terrors of domesticity that linked colony and metropole. (...) McClintock argues that race and skin color were made into fetishes in the imperial world, and that race itself and skin color itself (or approximations thereof) have less meaning, and less importance, than the fanta- sies they arouse and the bundled associations and connotations they generate

Product Details

BN ID:
2940148658368
Publisher:
ACLS Humanities E-Book
Publication date:
07/23/2013
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
462
File size:
8 MB

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