In the Dark Places (Inspector Alan Banks Series #22)

In the Dark Places (Inspector Alan Banks Series #22)

by Peter Robinson

Hardcover

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Overview

Published in the United Kingdom and Canada as Abattoir Blues

Louise Penny calls In the Dark Places "brilliant." Tess Gerritsen says it's "thrilling." And Michael Connelly describes Peter Robinson as "amazing." One of the world's greatest suspense writers returns with this sensational new novel featuring Inspector Alan Banks, hailed by Michael Connelly as "a man for all seasons."

It's a double mystery: Two young men have vanished, and the investigation leads to two troubling clues in two different locations.

As Banks and his team scramble for answers, the inquiry takes an even darker turn when a truck careens off an icy road in a freak hailstorm. In the wreckage, rescuers find the driver, who was killed on impact, as well as another body—a body that was dead well before the crash.

Snow falls. The body count rises. And Banks, perceptive and curious as ever, feels himself being drawn deeper into a web of crime, and at its center something—or someone—dark and dangerous lying in wait.

Vibrating with tension, ingeniously plotted, and filled with soul and poignancy, In the Dark Places is a remarkable achievement from this masterful talent.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780062240545
Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date: 08/11/2015
Series: Inspector Alan Banks Series , #22
Pages: 336
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 9.10(h) x 1.20(d)

About the Author

One of the world’s most popular and acclaimed writers, Peter Robinson is the bestselling, award-winning author of the Inspector Banks series; he has also written two short-story collections and three standalone novels, which combined have sold more than ten million copies around the world. Among his many honors and prizes are the Edgar Award, the CWA (UK) Dagger in the Library Award, and Sweden’s Martin Beck Award. He divides his time between Toronto and England.

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In the Dark Places (Inspector Alan Banks Series #22) 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Well done brief characterizations of police who fail to form or maintain intimate relationships as a back drop of crime solving
gloriafeit More than 1 year ago
From the publisher: The 22nd book in the DCI Banks series, “In the Dark Places,” develops some of the best-loved characters in contemporary suspense fiction. A perfect mix of police procedural and psychological study, the novel begins with a simple of vehicle abduction. Two young men implicated in the theft have vanished, and the investigation leads to two troubling clues in two different locations - - a scorched van and a peculiar bloodstain in an abandoned WWII airport hanger. As Bank and his team scramble for answers, the inquiry takes an ever darker turn when a truck careens off an icy road in a freak hailstorm. Rescuers swiftly uncover both the driver, who was killed on impact, as well as another body . . . a body that was dead well before the crash. Snow falls. The body count rises. And Banks, perceptive and curious as ever, feels himself being drawn deeper into a web of crime, and at its center something – - or someone - – dark and dangerous lying in wait. This is indeed a wonderful police procedural, but so much more than just that. Annie says of Banks “They’d have to drag him kicking and screaming out of his office soon. Or would he get a newer, bigger office and an extra five years’ grace if he got promoted to superintendent, as Gervaise had promised last November?” Alongside Banks in Homicide and Major Crimes of the Eastvale Police are his regular colleagues: DI Annie Cabbot, DC Dougal (”Doug”) Wilson, AC (Area Commander) Gervais, DC Gerry Masterson, forensic bloodstain analyst Jasminder (“Jazz”) Singh, as well as DS Winsome Jackman, a bit over 6’ in stature and surely one of the most intriguing of the cops in this wonderful series, having grown up in rural Jamaica, the daughter of a local police corporal. Then there is DCS Richard (“Dirty Dick”) Burgess, who’d known Banks since their school days, who Banks says “had a habit of turning up when you least expected him - - which was, perhaps, when you should most expect him) . . . The thing about Burgess, Banks knew from experience, was that however crude and blokeish he was with the lads, he was still a handsome devil in his way, and he had the sort of manly charm that many women found attractive. Not exactly a bit of rough - - he was too sophisticated for that - - but world-weary with a hint of danger and definite dash of the bad boy.” Banks is of course the central protagonist, alone since his divorce and not seeing either his son or daughter as often as he would like, only recently involved with the beautiful Oriana, almost half his age and presently vacationing in Australia. The book opens with Banks returning early from a weekend holiday, and on that Monday morning is faced with the incident of the stolen tractor, only the first in a series of various thefts, threats and murders. Always distrustful of coincidences, he is convinced that they are all connected. The descriptions of the ensuing investigations are done in the author’s usual elegant style, as are his forays into the inner lives of his cohorts. And sexist as this may seem, I was surprised to read the following, written by a male author about two of the important characters in the book (and I mean that in the most praiseworthy way): “Banks could understand what [she] saw in [him]: perhaps someone she could change and forge a future with. Someone who might lack ambition and wealth but who would cherish her and treat her with kindness and love. Someone who would look after her and Ian. Wouldn
Karen-M More than 1 year ago
Okay. I am a fan of British mysteries and especially of four gentlemen known as Chief Inspector Barnaby, Superintendent Adam Dalgliesh, Inspector Endeavor Morse and Inspector Roderick Alleyn. So, when I am introduced to a new potential representative of the British form of law and order, I have to ask myself ‘do I need to add another Inspector to my list of favorites?’ Well, this time the answer is a definite yes, I do, Inspector Alan Banks. The only fault I find in this new British favorite of mine is that I have started at the end of this series instead of the beginning, which is my fault not Inspector Banks’ fault. He will be added to my wish-list beginning with the first book, of course because I am filled with questions of his past history which at times is hinted at in In the Dark Places/Abattoir Blues (guess they thought most Americans wouldn’t know what an Abattoir was). Now, putting all my personal rambling aside, I really enjoyed this mystery. Interesting characters, enough suspense to keep me reading, solid descriptions of the countryside which made it easy for me to picture the desolate and lonely area of the crime scenes and a different sort of premise for crime and murder, one that I have not come across before. Two young men vanish and a tractor is stolen. Two separate cases to be solved or is there a connection? An accident with a truck reveals what may have happened to one of the young men but where is the other? The Inspector, freshly back from vacation, returns to headquarters and to his team, who after working both cases, have come to the conclusion that there may be a connection. First rate mystery which was a pleasure to read. I see more of Inspector Banks and his team in my future.
Delphimo More than 1 year ago
I have read all the Inspector Banks novels and some fall short of a reader's expectations, and this falls in that category. Descriptive and graphic violence dominate the book, and that little hope in humanity barely seeps through the cracks. Of course, not every book can live up to a reader's criteria. Inspector Banks falls to the sidelines as his team races to find a devious killer. Alan spends much of the time thinking of past events and his relatives, and wondering about his new romance with a much younger woman. The story seems off balance and never hits a balance.