Inferno

Inferno

by Larry Niven, Jerry Pournelle
4.1 30

Paperback(First Edition)

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Overview

Inferno by Larry Niven, Jerry Pournelle

After being thrown out the window of his luxury apartment, science fiction writer Allen Carpentier wakes to find himself at the gates of hell. Feeling he's landed in a great opportunity for a book, he attempts to follow Dante's road map. Determined to meet Satan himself, Carpentier treks through the Nine Layers of Hell led by Benito Mussolini, and encounters countless mental and physical tortures. As he struggles to escape, he's taken through new, puzzling, and outlandish versions of sin—recast for the present day.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780765316769
Publisher: Tom Doherty Associates
Publication date: 09/02/2008
Edition description: First Edition
Pages: 240
Sales rank: 1,255,865
Product dimensions: 5.53(w) x 8.21(h) x 0.63(d)

About the Author

Larry Niven is the award-winning author of the Ringworld series, along with many other science fiction masterpieces, and fantasy novels including the Magic Goes Away series. He has received the Nebula Award, five Hugos, four Locus Awards, two Ditmars, the Prometheus, and the Robert A. Heinlein Award, among other honors. He lives in Chatsworth, California.

Jerry Pournelle (1933-2017) was an essayist, journalist, and science fiction author. He had advanced degrees in psychology, statistics, engineering, and political science. As a science fiction author, he is best known for his many collaborations with Larry Niven, including Inferno, Beowulf's Children and The Mote in God's Eye.

Pournelle was the first ever winner of the John W. Campbell Award for Best new Writer in 1973.

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Inferno 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 30 reviews.
JawstheCabbie More than 1 year ago
How come Hollywood hasn't discovered this book yet, especially after 30 plus years? Seems to me that if the project were turned over to a top notch filmaker (George Lucas, Steven Spielberg and Ron Howard come to mind) and if the filmaker were to put as much love and craftsmanship into the film as Niven and Pournell did when re-writing Dante's Inferno, and if they were as faithfull to the story line as Niven and Pournell were to the original by Dante Alighieri, they'd have a summer blockbuster on their hands that people would be talking about for decades! I keep envisioning Harrison Ford as Allen Carpentier, and the late Allen King would have been perfect as Benito Mussolini if only the film had been made while he was still alive and working. I just found out through this website about the sequel to "inferno", and I can't wait to read it!
Guest More than 1 year ago
Renowned popular science-fiction writer Allen Carpentier makes a bet with his fans at a Los Angeles convention. Right out of War and Peace, he sits on the windowsill of a room on the hotel¿s eighth floor drinking a bottle of rum. About half way through he gags and falls out the window to his death.-------------- When Allen lands after what seems like eternity to him, he is shocked that he can think though somehow he finds himself in some sort of brass bottle that he wonders if it is his coffin. Some big Italian who says to call him Benito frees him from his bottle prison and agrees to be his guide as Allen treks through the concentric circles of Hell.----------- This is more than a reprint of the 1976 homage to Dante as Larry Niven and Jerry Pournelle apparently revised some of the journey to ¿set the stage¿ for a sequel next year. Accompanying Allen and Benito on the trek is fun as they meet an assortment of sinners through the circles. Obviously still filled with adulation of Dante, INFERNO is a modern day faster and hipper version.------------- Harriet Klausner
Guest More than 1 year ago
I first read this book thirty years ago. I was fourteen years old at the time, and once I finished reading it I rushed to my school library to read the three books of Dante's 'Divine Comedy'. 'Inferno' did not seem to catch on like many other Niven/Pournelle novels, but it made a lasting impression on me and I think this book is probably in a 'cult' status with other readers. After re-reading it again recently, even though it has some flaws that I did not notice thirty years ago (such as being based on a work of literature that views Hell from a strictly Catholic point of view--what other religion considers 'simony' to be an official sin? And in a Hell that probably houses billions of souls, how does one individual run across so many people he knew in life?), it is still a good read, and I found some of the 'updated' punishments, such as the ones reserved for those who destroy the environment, even more relevant today. I am looking forward to the coming sequel. My only hope is that the authors make this Hell a little more ecumenical.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Good story but it hasn't been made into a good movie yet. You need to study this one a bit longer.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
My senior thesis was Dante's Inferno as compared to T.S. Eliot's The Wasteland. (put Floyd's The Wall on headphones and dive into those cheerful little masterpieces some time) I ended that paper with the feeling that I was missing something important regarding the Inferno. I was. Reading this book put it in a more modern context and made it far more understandable. Follow it up with Escape from Hell for the full effect. I highly recommend these books.
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K_Dawn More than 1 year ago
Great idea of looking at today's sins in Dante's Infirno, but felt flat. Good gift for a Dante lover or for sparking conversation about modern sins, but Niven and Pournelle have much better books.
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