Ironskin

Ironskin

by Tina Connolly
3.8 19

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Ironskin 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 19 reviews.
chapterxchapter More than 1 year ago
I wanted to love this book… I wanted to shout from the mountain tops and praise this book and its gorgeous cover!  And though I did enjoy various parts of Ironskin by Tina Connolly, there was just something missing.  Fey? Okay, it got my attention.  A fey war against humans?  Mmmhmmm, more of my attention.  People who were injured due to this war and ended up with scars thus giving them different curses that can affect those around them?  Yes…yes… give me more… A widowed father who takes in such a cursed individual as a governess to help him with his daughter who has unusual fey abilities?  Okay, sign me up! Ironskin started off with a great background and world building that easily caught my attention.   It had been awhile since I had read a fey related book so how excited was I to start reading Ironskin and delve into the world of human vs. fey.  We learn of the war that happened between the fey and humans that left many people dead or scarred.  Those that died during battle were used by the fey as its own skin, to enter and arise again in “human” form and attack their foes.  But this also lead to loved ones having to go against those family members…friends…neighbours…and kill them again by means of iron to rid the fey from that body, and watch their loved ones die a second time. On top of that, those who fought alongside or were mere bystanders or were just in the wrong place at the wrong time and got caught up in the injuries of war wound up with war wounds.  Scars that they must face for the rest of their life.  And not only do these scars remind them of the war that happened 5 years ago, but remnants of the fey themselves are imbedded into their very being, giving them a curse which affects those around them.  Be it fear, hunger, rage, love… And the only way to subdue this curse if by placing a covering of ironskin over top of the scars.  To some, it may not be so noticeable as it can be hidden beneath the clothes they wear, but for main protagonist, Jane, it is a daily reminder of how others see her, and how she sees herself for the scar and ironskin she must wear is on one half of her face. Because of her curse, Jane knows she is able to help this child cursed who has fey abilities.  And it is after accepting this new position with Edward Rochart to help with little Dorie, Jane finds a way to try to cope with her curse, sans ironskin mask.  But Edward has his own dark secrets, and the pull that Jane feels towards Edward only brings her closer to this secret.  A secret that she may, in the end, wish she had never uncovered. I found that author, Tina Connolly, started the story off quite well.  Well enough for me anyways, that I was compelled to keep reading.  And where it started off strong in the beginning, come the middle, the story was at a standstill.  It was an endless circle of information that I had already known, and pretty much just an inner battle within Jane.  Lots of wandering in the house, one on one time with Dorie, and thinking of her sister. It wasn’t until well near the ¾ mark was it that things started to pick up.  It was at that point where I was unable to put Ironskin down.  It was what I had been hoping for with the action, and the drama, and the mystery.  The plot twists and turns…one after the other.  It was the rollercoaster ride that I was hoping for!  But way late in the book.  I wished that the action were brought forth sooner.  And although the action did come…the end just sort of … ended without a bang.  It does give some hope for what the next book will bring, but it wasn’t the cliffhanger moment I was hoping for either. All in all, Ironskin was a book that I was glad that I did end up reading.  Although I wish that there was more some things, and less of others, the shock factor found in the book was enough to satiate me.  I’m hoping that book 2 will be more of a bang.
TLynn6126 More than 1 year ago
This book was a little slow in the beginning. However, stick with it. It turned out to be a very good read.
Candace-LoveyDoveyBooks More than 1 year ago
Just like its gripping cover, Ironskin stopped me in place with dark mystery and a struggling, yet determined, heroine. Tina Connolly weaves a story with clever skill and fairy-tale appeal, a story that will regale and haunt minds long after its closing. Connolly grips and threads readers through the remnants of the terrible war between fey and humans while also focusing on Jane's conflicts, ranging from the depths of beauty to a mysterious romantic interest. While lightly steampunk, Ironskin is heavy with supernatural intrigue. Jane Eliot's cheek is scarred and fey-cursed. The iron mask that covers the whole of one side of her face not only hides her deformity, but also the fey powered rage that reaches out to any surrounding her. Jane has an extensive presence and feels so much like a non-fictional person, someone filled with grief over the past, heavy with worry over present trials. She struggles with being on the outside of normal, self-conscious of the mask. For all her deep contemplations of who she is versus who she would like to be, Jane has a strength identifiable from the outset of the novel. A strength that grows as Jane works through what she wants and faces the dangerous fey she believed were gone forever. Jane works as a governess to the daughter of Edward Rochart. She's charged with teaching Dorie to stop using her fey-curse, moving objects without using her hands. The task proves to be more strenuous than she expected, yet Jane is set on helping Dorie and comes to learn more about fey, the fey-cursed, and the war that started it all. The plot moves smoothly and with purpose, every action leading to revelations that will cause chills to shiver across the reader's spine. From all that has been seen of fairies and magic nothing will surprise readers as much as Connolly's take on such elusive creatures. Fey are infamous for their nefarious desire to take over human bodies, dead of course, but their attraction to physical beauty and extraordinary talent takes the top spot for filling hearts with trepidation. A tale of empowerment and control, Ironskin will segue into a sequel even more haunting and mysterious! *I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review* Also posted on Lovey Dovey Books
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BooksWithBite More than 1 year ago
Picking up a different kind I read, I enjoyed this book far more than I expected. 1. Historical. I love the way the historical history of the book weaves in the plot. It gives the book a feel of a different world that you simply can’t resist entering. 2. Iron Mask. The fact that this girl had to wear an iron mask to hide the scars beneath, and always being shunned drew me in like a moth. I wanted nothing more for this your girl to find love, despite her face. I wanted her to be able to find herself and have peace. 3. Secrets. A large mansion, lots of rooms and one man that is a mystery. It totally captured me and I let my mind wander throughout the dark halls, letting myself be submerse in what Jane uncovers. I love creeping around the corners and especially loved it when Jane got brave and ask questions! Squee! 4. Fae. Yup. They are somehow involved and I love this part of the plot unfold. It seemed to have flowed well with the plot bringing more elements in the book out. The build up toward the end is very well done and fascinating. 5. Insta-Love. Well not exactly. They had moments of flirtation but nothing to set in motion the romance. Only after continuous flirting did they realize their feelings for each other. And while, I’m okay with that, I prefer that they had more time to come to love each other, instead of the going back and forth with flirting. In the end, the story is quite good! A fine mix of historical and fantasy, Ironskin is memorable.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Short and sweet review. I started reading this novel with no idea what the genre was since i passed by the reviews. It takes a darn good book for me to burn the midnight oil over, but FeSkin did it. I am sure this is the way the Fey are truly meant to be since this entailed the symbolic twist of man's need for beauty and let us see this through using a representation that has frequently been viewed only as beautiful. The Fae.....Oh, except for Moning.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It was an interesting read.
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