The Jefferson Bible (with an Introduction by Cyrus Adler)

The Jefferson Bible (with an Introduction by Cyrus Adler)

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781420955279
Publisher: Neeland Media
Publication date: 05/11/2017
Pages: 80
Sales rank: 804,704
Product dimensions: 5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.19(d)

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The Jefferson Bible: The Life and Morals of Jesus of Nazareth Extracted Textually From the Gospels, Together with a Comparison of His Doctrines With T 3.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 57 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
By removing the supernateral elements of the narative and focusing on what Jesus acctually said, Jefferson has created a Gospel for all people, believers and skeptics alike. A truly enlighenting text that helps show what our founding fathers really did believe. Christian ethics and Reformation ideals of self-discovery at its very best.
6078mj More than 1 year ago
This version of the Jefferson Bible-or as Jefferson titled it, The Life and Morals of Jesus of Nazareth, is a fascinating document.This is Jefferson's version of the Gospels as he thought they should have been -with all miracles excluded. In this work Jesus is a philosopher, not a savior. This Nook book lacks an introduction or any notes, both of which would have been very helpful. Still for a dollar, you are getting an important historical document.
Bug53 More than 1 year ago
Pres. Thomas Jefferson was an independent thinker when it came to religion. His Bible is a modern day "cut & paste". I found it very interesting. Don't iss the biography of Jefferson at the end of the book.
joshua.pelton-stroud on LibraryThing 10 months ago
The Jefferson Bible is basically a distilling of the books of Matthew, Mark, Luke and John, removing (most of) the miraculous acts and focusing instead on the words and teachings of Jesus. In this it succeeds quite well, though the language is old and in some places a little hard to follow. The one thing I felt really hampered the book was the amount of repetition; when reading the New Testament, you don't really get a feel for how often Jesus says the same things over and over again, but nearly each parable related is told twice, making it a tad bit monotonous.Over all, it is a good, short refining for those more interested in the message Jesus spent his life trying to convey; almost an early American "Cliff's Notes" of the Bible, more than a treatise on the scripture itself. I would like to see it modernized a bit, with the language brought up to date and the repetition cut down.
stretch on LibraryThing 10 months ago
Finally, I have finished The Jefferson Bible, only took me two years to read a 169 page book. It's not for the lack on content or boring subject, I just kept losing my place over and over and over again... It's hard to find any organization that the original text had since Jefferson literally did a cut and paste job to produce this book, so I kept getting lost trying to follow the chapter verse layout.Thomas Jefferson worked for a couple restless nights in Washington carefully extracting bible passages from the gospels to revile the true essence of religion; collecting them into a single common sense gospel narrative. A brilliant and enlightening take on the essential heart of the teachings of Jesus of absolute love and service to others. Mr. Jefferson eliminated the virgin birth, the miraculous healings, and the resurrection, leaving only the essential teachings and a very human biography of Jesus.I found it fascinating to see which passages Jefferson felt were the correct telling of Jesus's life and what could be discarded. Then to try to piece those passages into a coherent biography. I think Jefferson did an admirable job, but parts still don't seem to fit quite right, often redundant information is conveyed in several places. I think that has far more to do with the structure of the gospels themselves then with Jefferson's edits. Overall, I feel this is one of the best ways to understand and grasp the true teachings of Jesus of Nazareth.
midlevelbureaucrat on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
The gospels according to noted deist, Thomas Jefferson. Jefferson took the books of Matthew, Mark, Luke and John, arranged them in chronological order to form a single narrative and expunged the miracles, creating an interpretation of the life of Jesus as a guide and teacher, not necessarily as the son incarnate. There's virtually no introduction to this edition; no historical context provided by the editor. Would've been nice to have one.
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