The Last Light of the Sun

The Last Light of the Sun

by Guy Gavriel Kay
4.0 41

Paperback(Reprint)

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Overview

The Last Light of the Sun by Guy Gavriel Kay

The renowned author of Children of Earth and Sky, Sailing to Sarantium, and Lord of Emperors

From the multiple award-winning author of Tigana, A Song for Arbonne, and the three-book Fionavar Tapestry that "can only be compared to Tolkien's masterpiece" (Star-Phoenix), this powerful, moving saga evokes the Celtic, Anglo-Saxon, and Norse cultures of a thousand years ago.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780451459855
Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date: 04/28/2005
Series: Northland Series
Edition description: Reprint
Pages: 512
Sales rank: 292,351
Product dimensions: 5.80(w) x 8.80(h) x 1.10(d)
Age Range: 18 Years

About the Author

Guy Gavriel Kay is the internationally bestselling author of more than a dozen novels. His work has been translated into over 30 languages. At the outset of his career Kay assisted in the editorial construction of J.R.R. Tolkien’s The Silmarillion. He has also written for the Washington Post, the Globe and Mail, The National Post, and The Guardian, among others, and has spoken at literary events around the world. He was won numerous literary awards, and is the recipient of the International Goliardos Prize for his contributions to the literature of the fantastic. In 2014 he was named to the Order of Canada, the country's highest civilian honour.

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Last Light of the Sun 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 41 reviews.
Ronin27 More than 1 year ago
I read "Under Heaven" by Kay and was simply amazed by the writing, characters, and setting... simply awed... could not buy another Kay book fast enough... "The Last Light of The Sun" reads in a very clunky, unpolished manner... shallow characters... does not seem like same writer...
Jeffrey Lambert More than 1 year ago
Although this book doesn't hold a candle to Kay's 'Lions of al-Rassan' it is still a very good book. Kay does a particularly good job creating a world that mirrors the history of European kingdoms and their struggles with the Norsemen of the age.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I've been a huge fan of Guy Gavriel Kay since the first time I read Tigana, after which I scoured bookstores to find anything else he'd written. I must agree with one of the other reviewers, in that I was disappointed. The poetry of his other works is missing and I wasn't as drawn in they way I have been with his other works. While I don't regret buying this book, I don't think it will win him many new loyal readers. If you're already a fan, I'm sure you'll read it anyway. If someone else recommended that you read Kay, start with any of this other novels and come back to this one once you're hooked. I would hate for anyone to start with this one and miss out on his other works.
Guest More than 1 year ago
My copies of Kay¿s works are well-worn, well-read, and well-loved. 'The Last Light of the Sun' takes its place upon my shelf, but I do not feel as much affection for it as I do for his other works. The story is well told, the phrasing is flawless, and it is certainly enjoyable to read, but there is a certain flatness, a missing spark of magic that runs through most of his works. For lovers of Historical Fantasy, this is a must-read. For lovers of Kay¿s work, enjoy, but don¿t expect it to resonate as much as his other works.
Anonymous 21 days ago
As usual, Mr Kay's prose is beautiful. But the plotting was tough to follow. He's got a lot of threads running through this weaving. And the individual stories are at least interesting, and some quite moving. And by the end, he manages to tie most if them up, some more satisfactorily than others, notably that of the two princes, Dai and Alun. But the story feels somewhat disjointed. A map would have gone a long way towards helping me to hold onto the various threads, and it is a curious abscence, as all of Kay's other works include maps. And this book seems to take place in the same setting, separated by centuries, as several of his other works. Worth reading if you are looking to immerse yourself completely in his world to better appreciate other books, such as The Lions of Al Rassan, or the Sarantine Mosaic duology.
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Looked up at the Imperator.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Sighs and looks over at a bush. Sees blue eyes and pads over,curious
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Watch in the shadows
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