My Life Among the Serial Killers: Inside the Minds of the World's Most Notorious Murderers

My Life Among the Serial Killers: Inside the Minds of the World's Most Notorious Murderers

by Helen Morrison, Harold Goldberg
3.4 66

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Overview

My Life Among the Serial Killers: Inside the Minds of the World's Most Notorious Murderers by Helen Morrison, Harold Goldberg

Over the course of twenty-five years, Dr. Helen Morrison has profiled more than eighty serial killers around the world. What she learned about them will shatter every assumption you've ever had about the most notorious criminals known to man.Judging by appearances, Dr. Helen Morrison has an ordinary life in the suburbs of a major city. She has a physician husband, two children, and a thriving psychiatric clinic. But her life is much more than that. She is one of the country's leading experts on serial killers, and has spent as many as four hundred hours alone in a room with depraved murderers, digging deep into killers' psyches in ways no profiler before ever has.

In My Life Among the Serial Killers, Dr. Morrison relates how she profiled the Mad Biter, Richard Otto Macek, who chewed on his victims' body parts, stalked Dr. Morrison, then believed she was his wife. She did the last interview with Ed Gein, who was the inspiration for Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho. John Wayne Gacy, the clown-obsessed killer of young men, sent her crazed Christmas cards and gave her his paintings as presents. Then there was Atlanta child killer Wayne Williams; rapist turned murderer Bobby Joe Long; England's Fred and Rosemary West, who killed girls and women in their "House of Horrors"; and Brazil's deadliest killer of children, Marcelo Costa de Andrade.

Dr. Morrison has received hundreds of letters from killers, read their diaries and journals, evaluated crime scenes, testified at their trials, and studied photos of the gruesome carnage. She has interviewed the families of the victims — and the spouses and parents of the killers — to gain a deeper understanding of the killer's environment and the public persona he adopts. She has also studied serial killers throughout history and shows how this is not a recent phenomenon with psychological autopsies of the fifteenth-century French war hero Gilles de Rais, the sixteenth-century Hungarian Countess Bathory, H. H. Holmes of the late ninteenth century, and Albert Fish of the Roaring Twenties.

Through it all, Dr. Morrison has been on a mission to discover the reasons why serial killers are compelled to murder, how they choose their victims, and what we can do to prevent their crimes in the future. Her provocative conclusions will stun you.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780060524081
Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date: 01/25/2005
Edition description: Reprint
Pages: 304
Sales rank: 233,128
Product dimensions: 4.18(w) x 6.75(h) x 0.77(d)

About the Author

Helen Morrison, M.D., is certified by the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology for general psychiatry as well as child and adolescent psychiatry. She is also a certified forensic psychiatrist. She is the editor or coauthor of four academic books, as well as the author or coauthor of more than 125 published articles in her field. Dr. Morrison has worked with both national and international law enforcement, and has made presentations in more than fifteen countries. She lives in Chicago with her husband and children.

Harold Goldberg has written for the New York Times Book Review, Vanity Fair, and Entertainment Weekly. He lives in New York City.

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My Life among the Serial Killers 3.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 66 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book was very disappointing to me. I had heard an interview with Dr. Morrison and it sounded interesting. I couldn't wait to get to the part about her 'controversial' theory. After two hundred and some pages she finally mentioned her theory - in one paragraph. She never develops this theory and never applies it to the cases she mentions. At the end of the book, the last chapter, she asks more questions about what causes serial killers to kill than supports her theory. If you are buying the book to read and maybe gain some insight, don't buy it. If you are buying simply for entertainment, you might like it. Overall, I would say that she's a terrible writer and scientist. A scientist knows how to develop a theory and support that theory. DON'T BUY THIS BOOK!
PhDeity More than 1 year ago
Sigh. I know it's hard to write a book, and I would not be surprised if authors read these reviews. So I don't take this lightly. But this is not a very good book. I had hoped that the author, with her medical background, would have better insights than many who have written on the topic, and I was prepared to wade through a bit of tedium if that's what it took. Unfortunately, the book is a double miss: it _is_ rather boring, but not the least bit enlightening. The author trots out several well-known cases, including ones where her involvement is limited or non-existent, and offers insights along the lines of 'there is something really wrong with these people.' She wraps up with a laundry list of tests she would like to do if she could...if I were teaching research methods to undergrads (have done so) I would've given her a "C-". You'll be better off with a good writer like Ann Rule, who, frankly, is not only a better story teller, but a more analytical thinker with a better grasp of her topic.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Dr. Helen Morrison has struck again. She baked a book about her career experiences with serial killers, law enforcement and the media. Long known as a doctor whose opinions were for sale to the highest bidder, she's done it once more. This book is full of scientific inaccuracies; and even some stuff the the good doctor fabricated on her own. There is the description of one serial killer developing blisters on his hands and arms when hypnotized and discussing some burns he received. Believable, right? Wrong. Hypnotized people cannot get blisters from talking about experiences with fire. Morrison threw this in to make the book more riveting. It didn't work. She also offers this 'blistering experience' as a reason for not talking to other serial killers about injuries they have experienced while on the hunt under hypnotic trance. Her reason? Talking about broken bones under hypnosis could cause bones to break. Want her for your doctor? I don't think so. Morrison, a favorite of the media, is known as a real ethical lightweight among the forensic community. Now, you can find out why. Don't waste your money on this one. Wait til it's in the library and let your kids take it out. They might find it believable if under 15.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The woman seriously does not know her field that well. Her insane theries are just that-insane. Who does she think that shes the expert and everyone else is wrong. Not recommended
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
On page 56 Morrison writes about an interview with Ed Gein. "But they said you sealed off a lot of your house and made it a shrine to her,(his mother) and that you kept your mother in that room after embalming her." I have read much about Ed Gein and have found nothing that says his mother was embalmed in the house. Maybe she watched Psyco and got them mixed up. I wonder if she asked him about the hotel he ran also.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Books on those who work with serial killers are normally self-aggrandizing anyway ('I was the first to theorize that the killer would be a left-handed podiatrist instead of a right-handed one!'), but this one is especially guilty. The writing is disappointing both in style and content. The actual writing is pedestrian and banal. The assertions are even more shaky. For example, Morrison takes issue with behavioral profiling, finding it overly simplistic, but it is her definition and understanding that it is simplistic. Granted, not everyone who sets fires, kills animals, or wets the bed will become a serial killer, but these are excellent markers present in a number of those who eventually murder. One cannot throw this notion out because not every serial killer fits this profile. This is the problem with Morrison's writing: she sets up a number of straw men and proceeds to knock them down, but her own theories are hardly sound. Save your time and money.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is an okay book. It's an interesting concept and I love reading about anything involving profiling. One reason I didn't like the book was the author's theory when it comes to serial killers. She believes that it's nature, not nurture. I have mixed feelings about that. Other than our differences of opinion, it's a well written book, but doesn't go into the details I had hoped.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I was expecting more, especially her so called interview with Ed Gein. Did she even have an interview with Ed? I got more of an understanding of his life and interviews in the book called "Deviant" by Harold Schechter. When reading my life amoung a serial killer...I felt a little lost, she jumped around a lot in her thoughts and understandings. Waste of money, maybe I should of read the reviews first before purchasing.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
My life among the serial killers by Helen Morrison was very well written and a good page turner. The author did an excellent job explaining her tactics in her psychology which made it more understandable. The scenarios she experienced were excellently written and shows lots of imagery.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Poorly written. Dr. Morrison can' t decide if she' s writing an autobiography or a treatise on serial killers. She is sanctimonious in criticizing others and laying blame on " the old boy's network" for her lack of success in this field. Yet her description of her "research" demonstrates lots of assumptions and very little scientific method. As a female physician who trained in the same era, I find her lack of professionalism disappointing. It's hard to believe that an educated woman could write such tripe. I'd give it no stars if I could.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
M-Pritchard More than 1 year ago
very good
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Thank Goodness that I borrowed this from the library and did not waste money on it. This has to be one of the worst books that I have ever read. I was initially excited to see Morrison's take on her interviews with so many serial killers. However, I now question if there really were that many interviews. Not only are her stories -- I mean interviews-- lacking any insight, they are also probably fiction. Did she really use hypnosis to recover memories?? Any freshman psych major can tell you that the human memory is very unreliable and hypnosis is even more unreliable!! I also find it astonishing that the killer broke out into blisters while recalling a fire -- really!! We are supposed to buy into that. There are also grammatical and contextual errors as well. Who edited this book?? Very bad!!
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littleredDK More than 1 year ago
Dr. Morrison certainly had a busy life, but not one that most of us would envy--instead we just want to peak and put away. Her insight and details are chilling as she becomes the intervewer of choice for many of the most notorious serial killers in America. Strongly recommend this for anyone who is curious about what makes these people tick.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Jannette Reyes More than 1 year ago
I was so absorbed in this book I even took it to work and read it on my breaks! Great book for anyone wanting to get inside the mind of a serial killer. The chilling details even made it somewhat hard for me to sleep! lol! Great buy!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago