Ninety Percent of Everything: Inside Shipping, the Invisible Industry That Puts Clothes on Your Back, Gas in Your Car, and Food on Your Plate

Ninety Percent of Everything: Inside Shipping, the Invisible Industry That Puts Clothes on Your Back, Gas in Your Car, and Food on Your Plate

by Rose George
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Ninety Percent of Everything: Inside Shipping, the Invisible Industry That Puts Clothes on Your Back, Gas in Your Car, and Food on Your Plate 4.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 8 reviews.
Muttdad More than 1 year ago
Rose George does a wonderful job telling about the shipping industry millions of people know nothing about. She travels aboard the Maersk Kendall as a passenger traveling thousands of miles on the high sea. It's her own personal adventure along with the story. I didn't want it to end........ a must read.
Anonymous 20 days ago
Great read for every American to understand how free trade actually gets here!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
ConnieCAR More than 1 year ago
The book starts off strongly into the authors entry onto a Maersk container ship, and her experience onboard, definitely not a "cruise ship". The history of container ship growth is interesting, as well as their vast capabilities as noted by the author. She also goes into great depth into the modern day piracy problems faced by shippers in the typical regions frequented by container ships. I was a bit disappointed in the wanderings by the author into more historical perspectives related to shipping in general, and from this point of view it was a good read for reference. However, I feel that more could have been written of her actual onboard experience on the container ship. I did feel that the author tended to drift a bit too much on distantly related topics, not directly related to the current trend in container shipping. From that point of view the book is somewhat disappointing, and the title a bit misleading, as the history of container shipping is good, but brief. Otherwise it is a good read, and I would recommend it to anyone with an interest in contemporary shipping, and the lost romance of shipping, meaning it is sadly no longer there.
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