Oedipus Rex (Dover Thrift Edition Series)

Oedipus Rex (Dover Thrift Edition Series)

Paperback(ABR)

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780486268774
Publisher: Dover Publications
Publication date: 06/01/1991
Series: Dover Thrift Editions
Edition description: ABR
Pages: 64
Sales rank: 70,211
Product dimensions: 5.00(w) x 8.00(h) x (d)
Age Range: 14 Years

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Oedipus Rex 3.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 25 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Oedipus Rex This book was a strange story featuring abundant dramatic irony, or irony the reader sees but not the characters. The book featured suspense, plot twists, and a relatively immersive story line. It was well written, and is a classic to this day. It did deal with issues such as murder and incest which might turn some readers away, but overall it was a decent read.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I'm a 13 year old, and although the tanslation has a broad vocabulary, by reading it carefully I understood it- to be a fantastic Greek play, which I highly recommend. It's the ultimate 'soap-opera'/play, complete with incest, murder, suicide, self mutilation, exile, and war.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Oedipus Rex is one of the most interesting plays, I have read in my AP English class. This was very sad, and it showed a lot of Dramatic Irony.
kaionvin on LibraryThing 10 months ago
What's interesting about fate, and what's different from our world and Oedipus's, is that "fate" doesn't really exist in our world. No real oracles go around telling you you're going to sleep with your mother. Instead, it's a philosophical device. On one side you've got "free will" (traditional very Western, very American even with the idea of the individual going forward), and on the other side you've got your fatalists (see my mom and her Vietnamese cosmology [is that the word? Whatever, I¿m going to use it], in which the people who are around you are literally born to be so because of the debt you owe each other in the present, owed in the past, and/or will use in the future). I'm not really a fan of philosophy, and as far as I'm concerned the goodness of each approach is only to be judged by how useful they are to a specific person in a specific situation (and place and time).I say that there is no fate in our world, but that's not really true. What separates fate from free will is foresight, and there's plenty of that in our world. A cancer patient (like my aunt) being told she has six months to live. One step lower on the surety scale, my remaining aunts and my mother living under the knowledge that they're likely (what, like 50/50 chances) to get this dubious inheritance from their father (oh hey! Antigone, didn¿t see you there). Or even to the much lower level of common sense, like stock markets: what goes up so precipitously, without merit, is likely to come down just as precipitously.What¿s interesting about Oedipus, is at first glance the prophecies within are so abhorrent, who wouldn¿t react in horror to the idea of killing one¿s father and sleeping with one¿s mother? But at second glance, is it not common sense, is it not true for all families that one day the son will surpass the father, one day the father will fall and the son will take the father¿s place? Is it not true men will judge their relationships with women against that first relationship with their moms? The prophecy given to Oedipus and to his birth parents is a sensationalist version of the common sense truth for all families (even to those where the son cannot so literally inherit a father¿s throne). And the real-world response to that un-sensational real-world dilemma is: ¿Hey, one day I¿m going to die, and I¿m going to try and leave the world(kingdom) in the hands of a good human being¿ (& ¿I¿m going to teach my son to treat the women he loves with respect¿ & ¿I¿m going to be good to my father while he¿s alive and a really good person when he¿s gone¿).You might say I¿m unfair in comparing Oedipus to an unchangeable fate (cancer, though for most people, I don¿t think killing one¿s baby is really an option on the table¿ but we¿ll get back to that). No, my aunt couldn¿t change her rapidly-growing tumor, but she could change the way she went out. She took hold of her finances for the first time in her life, she aired her grievances towards her husband (and the frightful in-laws) and her children instead of stewing in them, she tied up her inheritance to provide for her youngest through college, she got the death she wanted (at home and with Buddhist rites), all so she could live her remaining months in peace, and die in peace, instead of continuing to live (practically a lifetime) in sorrow. Is it fair she died so young? Is life fair?My mom doesn¿t know if she¿s going to get cancer in 4 years, but she¿s you know, de-stressing her life, selling the house, doing things she wants to do, and going in for all her medical tests. No, it¿s no magic trick to see one¿s future, it¿s magic to decide what to do about it. It¿s easy to get desperate and anxious to change one¿s fate, hey, how else do you think those snake doctors make a living¿ It¿s not always easy to see the difference between trying to `master your fate¿ and trying to make the best of it/just being proactive/smart.I say sensationalist, but that¿s not really true¿you needn¿t lo
burningtodd on LibraryThing 11 months ago
Read this play again for my English literature class. Glad I did. This is a fantastic play and it is really relevant to modern times. It also seems to relate to conversations and thoughts I am having about freewill.
donttalktofreaks on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
One of my all time favorites. Just proves that you can't change fate. Classic!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
TaniyaB More than 1 year ago
Oedipus Rex is an extremely interesting play that is impacted with intense emotions and actions, especially due to Oedipus’ tragic flaws that are a part of his hamartia. Sophocles’ play is about a young man Oedipus who is the king of Thebes. In the opening of his play, he looks over his people who are suffering from a plague. A priest informs him that this terrible event is occurring in their city-state because no one avenged the previous king’s death nor did they find his murderer. Oedipus, illustrating the qualities of a loyal and active king, vows to find the person who murdered King Laius, the previous king, and punish him for his sins. Little does he know that he is the murderer of King Laius, and his son, as well. When the dramatic irony intensifies, the audience realizes that Oedipus does not know of his true origins nor the prophecy that has led him to present day. It should be no surprise to the audience that Oedipus will eventually lead himself to his own downfall. However, it is the pathway to this final point that is interesting to analyze. The writing style, since this play is an old text, is difficult to comprehend with but not impossible.  The diction and tone surely help the plot move forward, as it hints of Oedipus’ downfall throughout the play. The theme, in my opinion, is that one cannot avoid or change the fate that he or she is destined to follow. He or she must cope with what the future has in store.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Im 12 and reading a great level of grades above mine and thoght this was a verey great play. I would recomend it also. But i also have to defend oedipus, i mean he tried to run from it but in the end fate wins over hope, he kills his father and marrys his mother.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
This book was a very good novel that i enjoyed reading and i couldn't put it down. And that means it was GOOD!!
Guest More than 1 year ago
It may seem sick for a man to kill his father and marry his mother, but this novel is a work of art by Sophocles. Read it and discuss it with more than one person. Great School material.
Guest More than 1 year ago
What are the odds? That's all I can say about Oedipus. He is a victim of bad fate. I feel bad for the guy. It's kind of hard to understand the language of the text, but if you pay close attention, it is a work of art. I suggest reading it twice in case you missed something when you read the first time. Or discuss it.