Pigs in Heaven

Pigs in Heaven

by Barbara Kingsolver
4.2 81

NOOK Book(eBook)

$12.24
View All Available Formats & Editions
Available on Compatible NOOK Devices and the free NOOK Apps.
Want a NOOK ? Explore Now

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

Pigs in Heaven 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 81 reviews.
Adrian Sloan More than 1 year ago
Loved this book as much as I did Bean Trees!
EmiliaBartelheim More than 1 year ago
Pigs in Heaven is a book I was really not looking forward to read at all. I chose it for the theme, and going into this I was dreading reading it, as there's nothing worse than having to read a really bad book, but I came out of it with a book that I can definitely call one of my favourites now. The real story begins with Taylor Greer on a sort of soul searching trip with her adoptive daughter, Turtle, a six year old girl Taylor was just handed three years earlier. They visit the Hoover Dam, and Turtle witnesses a near death, which lands them in the public eye for saving a man's life. It brings attention to Turtle's heritage, a void adoption, and a sudden battle to sort a girl into one of two cultures under what each think her best interests would be. Along the way, they meet strange characters, both for their gain and detriment, and the story not only follows them but a variety of characters all centered around the same plot. The relationships of every individual character that Kingsolver rotates through each chapter, and the development of their lives in relation to each other, highlights the actuality of personality in comparison to one's perception of themselves and the continuous segregation of culture and races in modern times. I can't really think of anything I didn't like about the book. The voice was really well executed, and the story line unlike anything I've read before. Somewhat educational, and research was obviously done to write the novel. One should read this book not for any particular reason than to read. It could aid in perhaps gaining a better understanding of modern segregation, but it's no history lesson. And although I tend to gravitate towards the 'New Science Fiction' section of the bookstores I frequent, there is a timeless quality that some books seem to have, this included, where you're not focusing on how it shallowly relates to your own life. You just read it.
sawyierlady More than 1 year ago
Kingsolver weaves the characters into a story that is unforgetable, building on culture of the localities involved. Great reading for pleasure and learning about differences.
steach More than 1 year ago
What a wonderful follow-up to The Bean Trees! With Turtle finally settled with her "adoptive" mom, Taylor, officials from the Cherokee nation threaten her security. Taylor flees Tuscon, trying to make a safe home for Turtle, but she cannot run away from her sense of responsibility for Turtle's heritage. While swept away in this wonderful novel, I also found myself learning things about the history of Native Americans, and the horrible treatment they received from the white culture. An amazing book that I wanted to go on and on. Any chance of a sequel?
Guest More than 1 year ago
I think this is a really good story for people who usually don't read. Its easy to follow the more you get into it. It's kind of sad at first and then at the end it all comes together to be a really good novel. I don't really read much but I couldn't put this book down. It had intresting characters in the story that you become to like because of how they handle certain situations. This is a really good book to read if you like to know a little about the Cherokee culture.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book was much better than the first book 'The Bean Tree' it has drama, action and keeps your interest page after page. Barbara Kingslover did a wonderful job.This is a must read book.
Anonymous 11 months ago
I hate u, u hate me. Let's tie barney to a tree!!! And kill him with a gun like a 44... No more stupid dinosaur!!! Fur on the floor. at the door. Death by a snore.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Pigs in Heaven, the sequel to The Bean Trees, is a great book to read. It keeps you on your toes and wanting to know what happens next. Taylor has very interesting and unique relationships with her daughter Turtle, her mother Alice, and her boyfriend Jax. They aren’t the “typical” relationships but that’s what made it such an amazing book. While reading the book I thought about what was the “right” thing to do? Should Turtle have been raised by someone from her culture/ background or raised by Taylor? Taylor may not have the same nationality, but loves Turtle and cares for her no matter what. At the end of the novel, the answer about what happens to Turtle isn’t completely defined, but it keeps you thinking. I loved the way the characters are revealed in the story. One example is, like the loneliness, and lack of success to keep healthy relationships, that were clear about Alice. Alice’s marriage with Harland gives judgment into her life of love troubles. While reading further into the book the reader gets a sense of community when Taylor and her mother Alice, visit the Cherokee town Heaven. Everyone knows everyone else's family history, children, and especially gossip. The author stresses how important being close family is in her description of the neighborhoods in the small town of Heaven. "It was Roscoe's mama's homestead land, sixty acres. Every one of them got sixty acres, back in the allotments. Most of them sold it or give it away, or got it stole out from them in some way. I don't know why she didn't, probably didn't get no offers. So we ended up here. When the kids each one got big, we told them to find a place to set a trailer house and go ahead” (page 221). A huge theme in this novel would definitely be the importance of family because it ties all of the characters together.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I loved this book. It is preceded by "The Bean Trees" and continues the saga of a Native American baby adopted by a well meaning but down on her luck white woman. In this story, inter racial and inter cultural issues are raised on the one hand while on the other it is a heartfelt story of loving relationships. I only wish Ms Kingsolver had continued the story of Turtle in yet a third novel.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago