The Pixar Touch: The Making of a Company

The Pixar Touch: The Making of a Company

by David A. Price
4.4 19

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The Pixar Touch: The Making of a Company 4.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 19 reviews.
RolfDobelli More than 1 year ago
This copiously researched, vivid account covers the rise of one of the world's most successful entertainment companies. Experienced journalist David A. Price fills Pixar's history with implied lessons about patience in management and running a creative company, but he doesn't seem much interested in writing a how-to business book, so he sticks to the historic narrative and draws few conclusions. Notably, Price, whose education is in computer science and law, writes more energetically about (and finds more drama in) the origins of computer graphics and the occasional lawsuits Pixar endured than in the harrowing high-wire act it goes through to make each movie - a struggle Pixar's Ed Catmull and others have discussed and written about often. getAbstract reports that the early parts of the story are the most colorful and dramatic, though the book is an entertaining read and a fascinating business case study all the way through.
Marek More than 1 year ago
Fast paced, entertaing story of the rise of animation powerhouse Pixar and how it almost came to not be. Nice information on the films and the major players of the company including Steve Jobs, Ed Catmull, and John Lassiter. Intersting insight on how technology had to be constantly improved on to keep up with the the desires to animate more complex feature films-the cart pushing the horse so to speak
BNMerch_Man More than 1 year ago
Nobody doesn't enjoy Pixar's movies, but (I hear you asking) why would anyone want to read a history of the company? The short answer, I suppose, is that only computer geeks and animation junkies need apply -- but if you've lived through the computer revolution and can remember life before the PC you may be intrigued at just how forward-thinking Pixar's founders really were. I mean, with powerful desktops everywhere and impressive digital video gimmicks a staple on YouTube, we take computer animation for granted. But The Pixar Touch reveals a gang of nerds who were keen to do Disneyesque animation on computers when these machines were still the size of refrigerators and crude graphical displays were an exotic, breathtakingly expensive technology. So Pixar's story is really a tale of visionaries hard at work trying to help technology catch up with their dreams -- and, after more than a decade hemorrhaging the money of successive owners George Lucas and Steve Jobs, barely getting there, with the landmark 1995 release of Toy Story, by the skin of their teeth.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Most books of this genre often resort to rumor and intuition about what 'really happened.' David Price uses a combination of personal interviews, news stories, press releases, and content from Pixar DVDs to draw a detailed mosaic of what has made Pixar successful over the past twenty years. Price supplies a highly objective account of the most difficult years of the company and brings us all the way through the acquisition of Pixar by Disney. While the book does not dive deeply into the collaborative methods the company employs, it does focus the reader's attention toward the importance of 'story.' In this case, John Lasseter's insistence on 'getting the story right' and understanding audience responses to concepts and ideas. Great stuff for anyone interested in marketing, the entertainment business, and best practices of creativity.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is awsome!
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book presents a compelling and fascinating story of an amazing company. The author has done an amazing job of creating a book that is both an apparently factual historical document that is also a really fun and engaging read. I would recommend this book to anyone with an interest in Pixar.
mikehampen More than 1 year ago
Very interesting. A must read for Pixar fans!
Daniel Moore More than 1 year ago
I love it more than anyone else , so if you love this company , you suck at loving!!!