Rikki-Tikki-Tavi

Rikki-Tikki-Tavi

Paperback(Reprint)

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Overview

Rikki-Tikki-Tavi by Rudyard Kipling, Jerry Pinkney

"Rikk-tikk-tikki-tikki-tchk!"

A classic story from Rudyard Kipling's The Jungle Book, adapted and illustrated by award-winning artist Jerry Pinkney, this is the tale of Rikki-Tikki-Tavi, a fearless young mongoose.

Soon after a flood washes Rikki into the garden of an English family, he comes face-to-face with Nag and Nagaina, two giant cobras. The snakes are willing to attack Rikki, and even the human family who lives there, to claim the garden and house for themselves. But they do not count on the heart and pride of the brave little mongoose.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780060587857
Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date: 05/11/2004
Edition description: Reprint
Pages: 48
Sales rank: 83,478
Product dimensions: 9.25(w) x 11.00(h) x 0.00(d)
Lexile: AD810L (what's this?)
Age Range: 4 - 8 Years

About the Author

Rudyard Kipling was born in Bombay (now known as Mumbai), India, but returned with his parents to England at the age of five. Among Kipling’s best-known works are The Jungle Book, Just So Stories, and the poems “Mandalay” and “Gunga Din.” Kipling was the first English-language writer to receive the Nobel Prize for literature (1907) and was among the youngest to have received the award. 

Jerry Pinkney is the illustrator of more than a hundred books for children. A five-time winner of both the Caldecott Honor and the Coretta Scott King Award, he has been recognized with numerous other honors, taught illustration and conducted workshops at universities across the country, and created art for the United States Postal Service's Black Heritage stamps. Books Mr. Pinkney has illustrated include The Ugly Duckling, John Henry, The Nightingale, and Noah's Ark. The father of four grown children, he lives and works in Croton-on-Hudson, New York, in a nineteenth-century carriage house with his wife, author Gloria Jean.

In His Own Words...

"I grew up in a small house in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. I was a middle child of six. I started drawing as far back as I can remember, at the age of four or five. My brothers drew, and I guess in a way I was mimicking them. I found I enjoyed the act of putting marks on paper. It gave me a way of creating my own space and quiet time, as well as a way of expressing myself. You can imagine six children competing for attention and to be heard. I would sit, watching and drawing.

"In first grade I had the opportunity to draw a large picture of a fire engine on the blackboard. I was complimented and encouraged to draw more. The attention felt good, and I wanted more. I was not a terrific reader or adept speller in my growing-up years, and I felt insecure in those areas. Drawing helped me build my self-esteem and feel good about myself, and, with hard work, I graduated from elementary school with honors.

"I attended an all-black elementary school, and I gained a strong sense of self and an appreciation of my own culture there. But Roosevelt Junior High was integrated. There I had many friends, both white and black, at a time when there was little mixing socially in school. There the spark for my curiosity about people was lit. You can see this interest and fascination with people of different cultures throughout my work.

"My formal art training started at Dobbins Vocational High School, and upon graduation I received a scholarship to the Philadelphia Museum College of Art. My major was advertising and design. The most exciting classes for me were drawing, painting, and printmaking. It is no wonder I turned to illustrating and designing books. For me the book represents the ultimate in graphics: first, as a designer, considering space, page size, number of pages, and type size; then, as an illustrator, dealing with the aesthetics of line, color, and form.

"There were three books that somehow magically came into my possession in the early sixties: The Wind in the Wows, illustrated by Arthur Rackham; The Wonder Clock, illustrated by Howard Pyle; and Rain Makes Applesauce, illustrated by Marvin Bileck. You can see those influences in my art today. Later, my work was greatly influenced by such African American artists as Charles White, Romare Bearden, and Jacob Lawrence.

"From the very beginning of my career in illustrating books, research has been important. I do as much as possible on a given subject, so that I live the experience and have a vision of the people and places. To capture a sense of realism for characters in my work, I use models that resemble the people I want to portray. My wife, Gloria Jean (also an author), and I keep a closetful of old clothes to dress up the models, and I have the models act out the story. Photos are taken to aid me in better understanding body language and facial expressions. Once I have that photo in front of me I have freedom, because the more you know, the more you can be inventive.

"For illustrating stories about animals, I keep a large reference file of over a hundred books on nature and animals. The first step in envisioning a creature is for me to pretend to be that particular animal. I think about its size and the sounds it makes, how it moves (slowly or quickly), and where it lives. I try to capture the feeling of the creature, as well as its true-to-life characteristics. There are times when the stories call for the animals to be anthropomorphic, and I've used photographs of myself posing as the animal characters.

"It still amazes me how much the projects I have illustrated have given back to me in terms of personal and artistic satisfaction. They have given me the opportunity to use my imagination, to draw, to paint, to travel through the voices of the characters in the stories, and, above all else, to touch children."

Jerry Pinkney is the illustrator of more than a hundred books for children. A five-time winner of both the Caldecott Honor and the Coretta Scott King Award, he has been recognized with numerous other honors, taught illustration and conducted workshops at universities across the country, and created art for the United States Postal Service's Black Heritage stamps. Books Mr. Pinkney has illustrated include The Ugly Duckling, John Henry, The Nightingale, and Noah's Ark. The father of four grown children, he lives and works in Croton-on-Hudson, New York, in a nineteenth-century carriage house with his wife, author Gloria Jean.

In His Own Words...

"I grew up in a small house in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. I was a middle child of six. I started drawing as far back as I can remember, at the age of four or five. My brothers drew, and I guess in a way I was mimicking them. I found I enjoyed the act of putting marks on paper. It gave me a way of creating my own space and quiet time, as well as a way of expressing myself. You can imagine six children competing for attention and to be heard. I would sit, watching and drawing.

"In first grade I had the opportunity to draw a large picture of a fire engine on the blackboard. I was complimented and encouraged to draw more. The attention felt good, and I wanted more. I was not a terrific reader or adept speller in my growing-up years, and I felt insecure in those areas. Drawing helped me build my self-esteem and feel good about myself, and, with hard work, I graduated from elementary school with honors.

"I attended an all-black elementary school, and I gained a strong sense of self and an appreciation of my own culture there. But Roosevelt Junior High was integrated. There I had many friends, both white and black, at a time when there was little mixing socially in school. There the spark for my curiosity about people was lit. You can see this interest and fascination with people of different cultures throughout my work.

"My formal art training started at Dobbins Vocational High School, and upon graduation I received a scholarship to the Philadelphia Museum College of Art. My major was advertising and design. The most exciting classes for me were drawing, painting, and printmaking. It is no wonder I turned to illustrating and designing books. For me the book represents the ultimate in graphics: first, as a designer, considering space, page size, number of pages, and type size; then, as an illustrator, dealing with the aesthetics of line, color, and form.

"There were three books that somehow magically came into my possession in the early sixties: The Wind in the Wows, illustrated by Arthur Rackham; The Wonder Clock, illustrated by Howard Pyle; and Rain Makes Applesauce, illustrated by Marvin Bileck. You can see those influences in my art today. Later, my work was greatly influenced by such African American artists as Charles White, Romare Bearden, and Jacob Lawrence.

"From the very beginning of my career in illustrating books, research has been important. I do as much as possible on a given subject, so that I live the experience and have a vision of the people and places. To capture a sense of realism for characters in my work, I use models that resemble the people I want to portray. My wife, Gloria Jean (also an author), and I keep a closetful of old clothes to dress up the models, and I have the models act out the story. Photos are taken to aid me in better understanding body language and facial expressions. Once I have that photo in front of me I have freedom, because the more you know, the more you can be inventive.

"For illustrating stories about animals, I keep a large reference file of over a hundred books on nature and animals. The first step in envisioning a creature is for me to pretend to be that particular animal. I think about its size and the sounds it makes, how it moves (slowly or quickly), and where it lives. I try to capture the feeling of the creature, as well as its true-to-life characteristics. There are times when the stories call for the animals to be anthropomorphic, and I've used photographs of myself posing as the animal characters.

"It still amazes me how much the projects I have illustrated have given back to me in terms of personal and artistic satisfaction. They have given me the opportunity to use my imagination, to draw, to paint, to travel through the voices of the characters in the stories, and, above all else, to touch children."

Customer Reviews

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Rikki-Tikki-Tavi 4.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 107 reviews.
WI-mom4 More than 1 year ago
My pre-school boys have developed an interest in snakes, reptiles, lizards (animals in general are interesting). I thought they would enjoy this story. They were so excited when they saw the book and wanted to read it immediately. It has become a favorite to read before bed. After reading the book, playing Rikki-Tikki is also a new fun pretend game. The book has led to discussions about what snakes eat and about venomous/non-venomous snakes and about geography and where snakes live around the world. The story is simple enough for my younger boys to understand but not so mundanely simple that mom and dad inwardly groan when the children bring us this story to read (again!)
Guest More than 1 year ago
I bought this book for my 8-year-old daughter. It is an excellent book with a lot of pictures.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I loved rikki he was an extrordinary mongoose and an extrordinary friend.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I remember reading this book as a child, and I am buying it now for my children. I used to read this book constantly, until it fell apart. It is a great story, and it has a lot of lessons for impressionable little ones.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I think the story Rikki-Tikki-tavi is something everyone should have to read it. Its about a mongoose that gets hurt in the woods and this boy finds him hurt just laying there with no movement and the boy comes and gets the mongoose and nurse it back to health and then two snacks come and try to kill the three people in the house so they can lay there eggs there. Description and summary of main points The mongoose gets hurt and a family takes him in. What happens next ? Evaluation I am going to evaluate the bird and Riki-Tiki. The bird was cool because he warned Rikki-Tikki, the mongoose, and they fought about it. And the family was safe from harm Conclusion I think is a good book because it is full of action Your final review It is great pick one up today?
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
the app creates warm and soft atmosphere.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Thumbs up for this one.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I love Rikki.....he is awesome! I want to be a mongoose just like him when I grow up....he is my ultimate hero
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
She padded in, curiosity shining in her green eyes. "Long time," she whispered, her face suddenly downcast. "Maybe too long of a time?" <p> I spent, like, two hours searching for you guys! Who knew that BloodClan even existed. I've missed ya'll, and I'm only on for dis weekend. <p> -_- <p> I'm thinking about changing Pika's name to something a little more current. (I've had it for what, 3, 4 years now?) Tell me what you guys think. <p> Haaaaaai Swift! <p> Love, your only Pikapower &infin
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Jttydfftytiktfffxccggrtdffdyyydtdidffdy REALLY REALLY REALLY GOOD BOOK!!!!! READ IT!!!!!!!!!!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Having to read this story (from a seventh grade textbook) and watching a short twenty minute video- this is amazing. I thought it would be stupid or a letdiwn. But it wasn't.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is a cute story. Was a little gaurded when it came to the snakes and the eggs. But my daughter liked the story and was eager to see the pictures.
Anonymous 22 days ago
Good shirt stiry
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Aupana, Ebcanbesa, Zukzana, Powa, Whozee....this is an amazing books!!! All the animals in the PrideLands should read this stuff. -The Lion Guard Jaja: Hmm What about the Outlands....are they trying to keep a little search..well it will not last long!!!!! Come on boys... Chugzi: Where are we going Jaja? Jaja: Come on furr brains where do u think were going!!! Chugzi: To the PrideLands?
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Her silent padding distirbed a sleeping cat at the edge of the camp. "I have been looking for you," said the she-cat. The moonlight cast a silver glow around her sleek, pale gray body; her ice blue eyes show in the night. "Is this not the infamous BloodClan?" She asked. She waited for the other cat to reply. He opened his mouth in reply...
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A night black shecat pads in lashing her tail. Her belly is swollen. Can I join your clan? I need somewhere to have my kits.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Does any body be on during 4:00 - 6:00 eastren time or any other timevthat equals to that. If so please say your codename and what times you can get on to talk.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
*pads in* is this bloodclan
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Shes not there
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Yo dudes wats kickin?
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Im have troublle with my gf i need help please
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
She padded in. "May I join?"
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I hat that lag. l somehow think that b&n does it on porpous.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
(Hi hullo i'd like to join... and I haz a question. Is Horseclan still around as well?)~Tawny
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
*Pads in as well*