Say No More (Jane Ryland Series #5)

Say No More (Jane Ryland Series #5)

by Hank Phillippi Ryan

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780765385369
Publisher: Tom Doherty Associates
Publication date: 11/01/2016
Series: Jane Ryland Series , #5
Sold by: Macmillan
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 352
Sales rank: 68,787
File size: 2 MB

About the Author

HANK PHILLIPPI RYAN is the investigative reporter for NBC's Boston affiliate and has won thirty-three Emmys and thirteen Edward R. Murrow awards for her ground-breaking journalism. Ryan has also won multiple awards for her bestselling crime fiction, including five Agatha Awards, and the Anthony, Daphne, Macavity, and Mary Higgins Clark Awards. Her books include The Other Woman, The Wrong Girl, and Truth Be Told, among others. Ryan is a founding teacher at Mystery Writers of America University and past president of national Sisters in Crime.
HANK PHILLIPPI RYAN has won five Agatha Awards, in addition to the Anthony, Macavity, Daphne du Maurier, and Mary Higgins Clark Award for her bestselling mystery novels. As an investigative reporter, her work has resulted in new laws, criminals sent to prison, homes saved from foreclosure, and millions of dollars in restitution for victims and consumers. Along with her 34 Emmys and14 Edward R. Murrow awards, Hank has received dozens of other honors for her ground-breaking journalism. A former president of Sisters in Crime and founder of MWA University, she lives in Boston with her husband, a nationally renowned civil rights and criminal defense attorney. She is the author of Trust Me, and the Jane Ryland series (The Other Woman, The Wrong Girl, Truth be Told, Say No More and What You See).

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Say No More 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
martha_martisima More than 1 year ago
As soon as I finished reading Say No More I had to go back to the beginning. True –- I had read it fast, wanting to know how it ended. Too much suspense for my poor heart! But as I read it for the second time I realized that what was happenings was that I could not be just a witness. I needed to get inside the story. Its power was too strong and would not leave me. So, I stopped and tried to analyze my feelings. What was it that made this particular story so powerful? It is not only the suspense. It has to do partly with the characters, so well portrayed that you know who they are without needing to read the names skillfully written at the top as each is given a turn. But their turn is not in the first person narrative but in the narrator’s view. Still, it also made me feel I got to know Jake better, and love him too. Stronger this way. The manner the plots become interwoven is gripping and makes the reader want to know more all the time. Not a single moment to be distracted, especially since one of the plots has to do with Jane’s documentary, meant to reveal the ugly truth about college by exposing a tragic campus-wide reality – rape. And she is told twice in anonymous letters to SAY NO MORE – just that. But Jane doesn’t know if it refers to her documentary or to her other endeavor. Neither does the reader, end even Jake doesn’t know. Suspense to the double! Opera plays a big part in the story, and “Tosca” takes a life of its own. It also tells us about the potent feeling expressed especially at the end of Puccini’s “Nessun Dorma” famous aria, and it is also evident in this book -- just the one word “Vincerò!” (I shall win!) is enough. This word is repeated throughout the novel by one of the characters, and in the end, together with remembering Tosca’s role in Puccini’s opera by that name, where she is a victim of an evil man, it helps her become free. By listening to it can one feel its strength more intensely. (You may want to hear it to feel it: Pavarotti - Nessun Dorma 1994 (With Lyrics) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rTFUM4Uh_6Y Say No More is a story to be savored – intoxicating as a good wine, satisfying as all chocolate... stimulating, seducing, possessing a unique and magical quality, as all other Ryan’s books. Every new one makes me like it better than the ones before, which only attests to the intensity and accomplishments of this author’s writing. Please, Hank Phillippi Ryan, do say more. And soon! Latest version – 11 December 2016 am This is a very personal review of Say No More by Hank Philippi Ryan As soon as I finished reading Say No More I had to go back to the beginning. True –- I had read it fast, wanting to know how it ended. Too much suspense for my poor heart! But as I read it for the second time I realized that what was happenings was that I could not be just a witness. I needed to get inside the story. Its power was too strong and would not leave me. So, I stopped and tried to analyze my feelings. What was it that made this particular story so powerful? It is not only the suspense. It has to do partly with the characters, so well portrayed that you know who they are without needing to read the names skillfully written at the top as each is given a turn. But their turn is not in the first person narrative but in the narrator’s view. Still, it also made me feel I got to know Jake better, and love him too. Stronger this way. The manner the plots become interwoven is gripping and makes the rea
Carstairs38 More than 1 year ago
I’ve Got Plenty to Say about This Book When I pick up one of Hank Philippi Ryan’s books, I know I am in for a fun ride. Her Jane Ryland series skirts the end of the cozy side of the mystery spectrum, and I enjoy this slight break in genre. Say No More is her latest, and it’s another compelling read. Jane Ryland has landed a new job as a reporter for a TV station in Boston. However, instead of reporting on the news, she’s responsible for creating hour long documentaries. She and her new producer are working on a story about campus rape aimed to coincide with the start of the fall semester. However, on the way to an interview, they witness a hit and run. Jane gets the license plate of the drive and a good look at his face, but reporting that to the cops might be more than she bargained for. Meanwhile, her boyfriend, Boston homicide cop Jake Brogan, is called to the scene of a suspicious death. A woman has been found floating in her backyard pool. The call came in from a next door neighbor, but it seems that everyone connected with the crime is trying to hide something. Can he figure out what clues actually pertain to his case? We actually bounce between Jane, Jake, and three other characters over the course of the book. Don’t worry, each point of view change is clearly marked. It creates a fun way to get fully into the story as we wait to see how everything will come together for in the end. The various plots intersect every so often, and not just when Jane and Jake are sharing page time. I’ll leave the rest up for you to discover as you race through the book. Hank makes good use of the various points of view to pull us into the story quickly and keep us engaged. No, we don’t have cliffhangers every time the view point shifts, but I was usually thrilled to get back to each character to find out how things were progressing. And all of the characters are strong. Jane and Jake lead a very small cast of returning characters, and I enjoy seeing them and their relationship evolve. That leaves plenty of room in the book for new characters, and they come alive before our eyes. There was one view point character I especially found myself rooting for, and I love how that person developed. All three of the new viewpoint characters had strong arcs that I enjoyed. (Yes, I might have been cheering at what happened to one of them.) All this said, I do have one complaint with the book, and it is a rather big one. Throughout the book, but especially at the beginning, Jane resists getting too deeply involved as a witness to the hit and run. She tries to use her position as a reporter to stay out of it, citing her desire to report the news, not be the news. Sorry, but that’s baloney! Overall, this is a minor complaint, however. In fact, I’m already looking forward to visiting Jane and Jake again. If you haven’t read this book yet, you really should pick it up today. And so I don’t spoil anything, I will Say No More.
Storytellermary More than 1 year ago
SAY NO MORE by Hank Phillippi Ryan Wonderful, multi-strand plot, which in less able hands would be confusing, but Ryan keeps everything clear* as the strands weave together, suspense building to see what pattern will emerge. Jane Ryland, reporter, semipublic about her relationship with Detective Jake Brogan, still faces the complications of a need to keep a lid on some information, but those complications work well to build suspense and drama. Jane, working with a new colleague, Fiola, on a documentary about sexual assaults on campus and systematic cover-ups researches “how it was supported to work” and where it has broken down. Will “Tosca” find the courage to speak up? Will Willow? Jane gets a taste of how hard speaking up can be when she is called to identify a hit and run driver, and we all get to see the power of taking control, coming out of hiding, and speaking out. The catharsis of being able to deflect some real-life angst onto the hateful and selfish Dean Tarrant, and the power and strength of collective efforts for good in this work of fiction helped me cope with a very difficult week in the “real world.” I finished reading it last night and got my first full night’s sleep in over a week. Books as medicine . . . still works with the right book. I don’t like spoilers, so tempting as it is I’ll SAY NO MORE. * (Telling on myself) There was one point when I wondered how Jake knew something, sure I’d missed something, so I looked back to see . . . nope, anonymous source, hadn’t been revealed yet. All clear in good time. With some complex books I find I need to make notes on a post-it to keep things straight, but I can trust Hank for clarity without crib sheets.
gloriafeit More than 1 year ago
From the publisher: When Boston television reporter Jane Ryland reports a hit-and-run, she soon learns she saw more than a cara crash - - she witnessed the collapse of an alibi. Working on an expose of sexual assaults on college campuses for the station’s new documentary unit, Jane has just convinced a date rape victim to reveal her heartbreaking experience on camera. However, a disturbing, anonymous message that arrives in her office mail - - SAY NO MORE - - has Jane really and truly scared. Homicide detective Jake Brogan is on the hunt for the murderer of Avery Morgan, a hot-shot Hollywood screenwriter. Morgan’s year as a college guest lecturer just ended at the bottom of her swimming pool in the tight-knit and tight-lipped Boston community called The Reserve. As Jake chips his way through a code of silence as shatterproof as any street gang, he’ll learn that one newcomer to the neighborhood may have a secret of her own. A young woman faces a life-changing decision - - should she go public about her assault? Jane and Jake - - now semi-secretly engaged and beginning to reveal their relationship to the world - - are both on a quest for answers as they try to balance the consequences of revealing the truth. In the opening pages, Detective Jake Brogan, grandson of a former Police Commissioner, one of the city’s top homicide cops and his partner, Paul DeLuca, discover Avery’s dead body at the bottom of her pool. That same morning, Jane witnesses the hit-and-run which puts her in the middle of a tough balancing act between her obligations as a citizen and those of a journalist. The entire fast-moving and page-turning plot takes place over a four-day period. A second story line deals with the issue which is the crux of Jane’s documentary being prepared for airing on her TV station, taking her into the lives of women who have reported the sexual assaults visited upon them and duly reported to Edward Tarrant, the dean of students at the University and the Title Nine coordinator whose job it is to make sure all assault complaints are investigated, if the students want that done. Jane, now nearly 34 years old, is a former award-winning investigative reporter who has spent more than seven years in news, often on the crime beat, though no longer covering crime. Unfortunately, Tarrant sees himself as the “fireman . . . When there’s a public relations fire, I put it out.” As to the “incidents” themselves, his job, to him, calls for them to be “glossed over, erased, redeemed, or Band-Aided.” The timing of this novel, in this pre-election period when sexual assaults are in each day’s headlines, is nearly prescient. Interestingly, p.o.v. changes are identifiable by the chapter-like (although often mid-chapter) headings. Another excellent entry in the series, and one which is recommended.