Shock Value: How a Few Eccentric Outsiders Gave Us Nightmares, Conquered Hollywood, and Invented Modern Horror

Shock Value: How a Few Eccentric Outsiders Gave Us Nightmares, Conquered Hollywood, and Invented Modern Horror

by Jason Zinoman

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780143121367
Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date: 05/29/2012
Pages: 288
Sales rank: 587,962
Product dimensions: 5.50(w) x 8.40(h) x 0.70(d)
Age Range: 18 Years

About the Author

Jason Zinoman is a critic and reporter covering theater for The New York Times. He has also regularly written about movies, television, books and sports for publications such as Vanity Fair, The Guardian and Slate. He was the chief theater critic for Time Out New York before leaving to write the On Stage and Off column in the Weekend section of the Times. He grew up in Washington D.C. and now lives in Brooklyn.

What People are Saying About This

Mark Harris

If you think you already know everything you need to know about the '70s revolution in American film, think again, and take a trip to the (very) dark side with Jason Zinoman's astute, informed and vivid exploration of how the horror movie came back from the dead and walked among us once again. The decade that stretched from Rosemary's Baby to Alien saw the creation of just about every template for modern horror, and Zinoman brings a fan's appreciation, a critic's tough-mindedness and a reporter's zeal to his group portrait of the movies that reshaped a generation's sleepless nights. Aficionados should love it, and skeptics may find themselves giving this always disreputable genre the fair shake that, as this smart and savvy book makes clear, it deserves. (Mark Harris, author of Pictures at a Revolution)

Guillermo del Toro

Vivid and fascinating, Shock Value chronicles a period that feels both close and, sadly, remote. It is the fresco of a brave, uncompromising era in genre filmmaking. Mavericks, madmen, mutants and monsters populate this entirely relevant book.--(Guillermo del Toro, Director of Pan's Labyrinth and Hellboy )

Adam Lowenstein

If the soul of American cinema in the glory years of the 1970s belonged to names such as Altman, Coppola, and Scorsese, then its flesh and blood came from directors like Carpenter, Craven, Hooper, and Romero. Jason Zinoman shows us how and why by giving these pioneers of modern horror a chance to tell their own story, often in their own fascinating words. The result is a riveting history of fear and film that will thrill anyone who believes that movies can open our minds while they rip out our guts.--(Adam Lowenstein, author of Shocking Representation: Historical Trauma, National Cinema, and the Modern Horror Film)

Sarah Langan

This is a titillating, insider's guide to the most influential horror movies of our time, and the men who made them. Full of weird personalities, studio-screwage, and pesky mental breakdowns, Shock Value does for horror what Peter Biskind's Down and Dirty Pictures did for the studio system. Zinoman gives the genre what it needs most: an intelligent vivisection. I'll never think about Wes Craven or Brian De Palma in the same way again.--(Sarah Langan, author of The Keeper and Audrey's Door)

From the Publisher

"Aficionados should love it, and skeptics may find themselves giving this always disreputable genre the fair shake that, as this smart and savvy book makes clear, it deserves." —-Mark Harris, author of Pictures at a Revolution

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Shock Value: How a Few Eccentric Outsiders Gave Us Nightmares, Conquered Hollywood, and Invented Modern Horror 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 14 reviews.
Kellswitch on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Overall an excellent look into the development of modern horror, what influenced it and how it's influenced current entertainment. Some of the stories I've heard before but most were, if not fully new, had enough new details to them that I felt I learned something new about these movies and their creators.I mostly read this book hoping to gain some insight into the popularity of movies such as Last House On The Left or Texas Chainsaw Massacre and while that didn't happen I do have a better appreciation for what went into making them and the impact they have had. I think I will just have to accept that fact that hyper violent movies will never make sense to me.
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Ddavidson1173 More than 1 year ago
But seems to gloss over Halloween and especially Friday 13th.
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Daniel Williams More than 1 year ago
Horror's Raging Bull this book has much of the excitement and "inside" talk of that book My only complaint is an overemphasis of HItchcock (who I love) given the genre and not enough on lesser known figures Although not directors a whole chapter could've been done on Savini and other makeup pioneers A must for fans
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Christopher Ames More than 1 year ago
Overall, i dug it. I thought the first half was fantastic but it does become a tad tidious in the latter half when the author starts to give a very shallow cultural critique of the horror genre in general. The behind the scenes stuff though is incredible esp. The making of Cravens last house on the left
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