Simply Divine

Simply Divine

by Jacquelin Thomas
5.0 9

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Simply Divine 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 9 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This was a great read
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Amazing book! Very inspiring
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Lawral More than 1 year ago
Divine starts out as such a spoiled brat! She can't imagine life without a personal assistant, bodyguard, and chef, mostly because she's never had to but also because she deserves to have people do for her. Not that she's actually done anything to earn the money that pays those people or done anything to justify the fame she enjoys. Her mom has. She's so entitled and that bugs me. Luckily, once Divine gets to Georgia her cousin Alyssa has absolutely no problem calling Divine out for her snobbery, general bratiness, and trading in on her mother's name. She does her best to make Divine comfortable, the whole family does, but Divine is determined to be miserable in Georgia and drag everyone else down with her. Eventually, though, she starts to settle into life with her aunt, uncle, and cousins and generally becomes a much more likable person and character. And, really, she wasn't sooo bad in the beginning that I couldn't get into the book, and it was pretty obvious (in the way teenagers can be, not in a bad writing way) that a lot of her snobbery was to cover up insecurities about herself. But she still drove me a little bit nuts before she started chilling out. One of the many things Divine has to get used to at her aunt and uncle's house is going to church. Though her daddy was also a preacher, Divine's mom does not have anything to do with the church now. Divine never has; that's just not the way she was raised. Her Uncle Reed's family attends the church he preaches in every Sunday. At first, waking up early on Sunday and sitting through a sermon causes problems for Divine; the girl is really not a morning person. As she starts to listen more often to what Uncle Reed is preaching, her problems change to focus on the act of forgiveness. How can she possibly forgive her father for what he's done to her and her mother? And why should she have to? Divine's internal struggle with forgiveness and her feelings about her father in general continue throughout the book. Her resentment about going to church does not, and she eventually becomes a Christian. Religion is never forced on her by her family, nor is it really central to most of the book. However it is often present, particularly in the way that Uncle Reed and Aunt Phoebe raise and treat their children, including Divine. Especially with regards to Divine and Alyssa and boys. Both girls have boyfriends, but they are little more than names on a page. Given how little time they're allowed to spend with their boyfriends, this is not surprising. I expect that they, and the girls' relationships with them, will play a bigger role in the next book in the series, Divine Confidential, as the girls finally become old enough to be allowed to actually date. But I have no doubt that the second book will be just as clean as this one. Even though it is a book with an extra-marital affair, drugs, sneaking around to meet up with boys, and even a murder, it definitely qualifies as a "clean read." I don't even remember any swearing. Yet it still manages to feel a bit edgy, probably because Divine's parents are kind of screw ups. With the help of her uncle, aunt, cousins, and God, Divine manages to move beyond her parents mistakes to star in a series that promises to be uplifting and cute while still tackling serious issues. Book source: Philly Free Library
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Guest More than 1 year ago
I enjoyed Mrs. Thomas' novel...enjoyable, quick read...looking forward to the sequel.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The book Simply Divine written by Jaqueline Thomas is about a young girl who has gone from glamour and glory to what she thought was just right down and dirty because of her parents actions. When Divine is caught in the middle of both of her celebrity parents being in big trouble, she soon finds herself in a new home. Divine¿s mother, who is also a famous singer, feels like the best thing for her daughter to do is to move away from the craziness. Divine is sent to live with her uncle and his family in Georgia while her mother undergoes special help and her father is put in jail. I loved this book because one, it was my first and so far my favorite Christian based book, and the drama in the book kept me excited. Divine¿s personality is so real to the point till it was easy for me to relate her to many of my friends and myself. I would recommend this book to anyone but definitely to someone who likes to laugh. Make sure to check out the sequal, Divine Confidential.
Guest More than 1 year ago
In Simply Divine, we meet Divine Matthews-Harrison, a teenager that has the BEST of everything. Divine's parents are well known singer Kara Matthews and actor Jerome Hardison. Divine and her dad have a poor relationship thanks to his dishonesty. Always having lived the glamorous life, she's popular, owns designer clothes and her hair and nails flawless. Chores! Not for this spoiled drama queen brat. Kara wins a Grammy and Divine's world is turned in a different direction. Jerome and Kara's lives spin out of control. So where is Divine? She's sent to Georgia with Uncle Reed and his family. There has always been a large house with a maid, cook, and driver where Divine has lived. But in Georgia, her family lives in a three bedroom house with only ONE BATHROOM and five people. Can things get any WORSE!?!?!?! Simply Divine is a very good read that I would recommend to teenagers as well as adults.