The Bewildered Bride

The Bewildered Bride

by Vanessa Riley

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Overview

Ruth Croome, a Blackamoor heiress, was supposed to get married in a gorgeous wedding gown, made from her father’s exquisite fabrics. Instead, they eloped to Gretna Green and upon returning, their carriage was beset by highwaymen and she witnessed the murder of her new husband. Now, four years later, with a child, she wants to move on with her life. A marriage of convenience will do. Ruth already had a love for the ages.

Adam Wilky is really the heir to the Wycliff barony—which he never told Ruth. Too much danger. So many secrets. When he was nearly beaten to death and sold into impressment, he thought Ruth had died, too. Ready for revenge, he finally returns and discovers Ruth alive—with a son who could only be his—and she is furious to discover he lied to her. Now it’ll take more than remembered passion if he hopes to win his reluctant wife back...

Each book in the Advertisements for Love series is STANDALONE:
* The Bittersweet Bride
* The Bashful Bride
* The Butterfly Bride
* The Bewildered Bride

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781640638471
Publisher: Entangled Publishing, LLC
Publication date: 08/12/2019
Series: Advertisements for Love , #4
Sold by: Macmillan
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 400
Sales rank: 10,282
File size: 2 MB

About the Author

Award winning, Amazon Bestselling author, Vanessa Riley, worked as an engineer before allowing her passion for historical romance to shine. A Regency era (early 1800s) and Jane Austen enthusiast, she brings the flavor of diverse, eclectic peoples to her stories. The author of Madeline's Protector, Swept Away, Unmasked Heart, The Bargain, and Unveiling Love, she has won the Beacon Award, the Colorado Award of Excellence, and placed in the International Digital Awards for her Regency romances.

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The Bewildered Bride 3.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 8 reviews.
GangstaProf 5 days ago
I really enjoyed this book. That doesn't seem like quite the right word to use, as parts of the plot are heartbreaking, but I truly liked this book. I found this portrayal of Black life in London during the Regency era fascinating--these are untold stories, and it's important to finally hear them. I haven't read many romances that deal with the issue of passing (Beverly Jenkins' Forbidden is a notable exception), and it was fascinating to see that explored in this era. My only problem with this book was the choice to switch between a first person narrator (the heroine) and a third person narrator (who spoke from the hero's perspective). This choice did not work for me at all. This was the first book I'd read by this author, and in spite of my complaint about the narration, now I am excited to go back and read her previous work. I received an eARC from the publisher via NetGalley. All my opinions are my own.
EastsideFan 7 days ago
CW: sexual assault, lynching, anxiety Riley writes about the experiences of people of color in regency England. Too often these stories are all white, while England most definitely was not. As usual, she deals with issues of race in the time. Who will be accepted? What will life be like for a dark skinned woman married to a light skinned man? Which neighborhoods are lived in? Blackamoors were free and ran successful businesses and interacted with others. I really appreciate reading a full representation of the time. The latest from Vanessa Riley's Advertisements for Love series, begins with one of the most harrowing scenes that I've read in a long time, especially from an historical romance. Adam/Wycliff and Ruth are attacked a few days after their Gretna Green marriage, both beaten almost to death. It is brutal to be in the head of the victims. Then we are moved 4 years ahead, where Ruth is existing at her parent's home. Readers of Riley's The Bashful Bride, will recognize the Croome family. No one has believed Ruth's story, and don't hesitate to tell her so. The cruelty is breathtaking. They don't believe she was married or that her husband is dead. They believe her child is from either an "indiscretion" or from the brothel in which her father found her. No one believes her and the former wild child has folded into herself for her own protection. She also suffered an injury affecting her eye sight, leaving her more vulnerable and only increasing the anxiety that she has. Only Wycliff/Adam is not dead, he was pressed into the Navy by his evil relatives. He thought Ruth was dead. Now he has inherited the title and learned Ruth is alive. He wants her back, while still plotting revenge on those who attacked them. That's a lot. Ruth's family is just not sympathetic, so the reader is definitely on Ruth's side. The passage of time and physical changes of both main characters, leave it plausible that Ruth doesn't know Wycliff is Adam. And most of the story hinges on Wycliff trying to get Ruth to fall in love with him, and Ruth not knowing he is her husband. Wycliff's revenge is methodical and financial, not crazed vigilante. All of these things make sense, but for me, the narrative came to a snail's pace at time. I didn't lose interest, but it took most of the book to get to the reveal. On the other hand, the reveal happens organically, in a way that makes sense, when puzzle pieces fall into place for Ruth. And we do get to HEA, with several loose ends wrapped up. What Riley has done especially well is deal with issues of being believed. Ruth has struggled with this from the time of the attack. The people around her - her parents, her sister, her mother's friends - believe nothing she has said. She was attacked, beaten, raped and found in a brothel. Why do people only believe the worst of her, instead of believing she was a victim? How many woman have asked this very question? Ruth needs Wycliff to first believe her. Only after that can she move on and really open herself up to life with her husband again. This is beautifully handled. I really felt Ruth's emotions deeply. Believe women. This is a closed door romance, the connection is an emotional one. POV moves back & forth between the main characters, between both first & third person narrative. I did not find it problematic or distracting. Even though it is book #4 of the series, it is a standalone. I received an e-ARC via NetGalley, opinions are my own.
beckymmoe 8 days ago
The Bewildered Bride is a sloooooow moving/slow burn second chance romance (though only one character actually is aware of their second chance status for 80% of the book!) that has a whole lot going on besides the romance. Revenge. Secrets. A hidden identity. Tragic and often-horrific pasts. A fatherless child who may or may not be illegitimate... So. Much. Going. On. Ultimately, The Bewildered Bride had a very sweet ending, but goodness, it took so much to get us all there. Adam kept his true identity hidden from Ruth way longer than he should have--I lost count of how many times she thought goodness, this [add in a thing about the baron here] reminds me so much of Adam! or his [fill in aspect of his person/personality here] is just like Adam's! Seriously, it was near constant, and soooo frustrating. She also did an awful lot of waffling between wanting to be with him--he made her feel so safe and protected!--and not trusting him at all and pushing him away. All part of being a "bewildered bride" I guess? The alternate first person POV (Ruth's) and third person (Adam's) was a bit disconcerting; I never did fully get used to it. The drama with Adam's relatives, who were the villains of the story from start to finish was solid, though, and kept me turning the pages to find out just how many evil deeds they were capable of and how and when they would finally get their due. They did not disappoint, either in their villainy or in their comeuppance. ;) This is the 4th book in the series, but it worked just fine as a standalone. It's not at all obvious who here might have even been in previous books (Ruth's sister, maybe?) so going into it not knowing anything about the rest of the series books wasn't an issue at all for me. Rating: 3 1/2 stars / C+ I voluntarily reviewed an Advance Reader Copy of this book.
beckymmoe 8 days ago
The Bewildered Bride is a sloooooow moving/slow burn second chance romance (though only one character actually is aware of their second chance status for 80% of the book!) that has a whole lot going on besides the romance. Revenge. Secrets. A hidden identity. Tragic and often-horrific pasts. A fatherless child who may or may not be illegitimate... So. Much. Going. On. Ultimately, The Bewildered Bride had a very sweet ending, but goodness, it took so much to get us all there. Adam kept his true identity hidden from Ruth way longer than he should have--I lost count of how many times she thought goodness, this [add in a thing about the baron here] reminds me so much of Adam! or his [fill in aspect of his person/personality here] is just like Adam's! Seriously, it was near constant, and soooo frustrating. She also did an awful lot of waffling between wanting to be with him--he made her feel so safe and protected!--and not trusting him at all and pushing him away. All part of being a "bewildered bride" I guess? The alternate first person POV (Ruth's) and third person (Adam's) was a bit disconcerting; I never did fully get used to it. The drama with Adam's relatives, who were the villains of the story from start to finish was solid, though, and kept me turning the pages to find out just how many evil deeds they were capable of and how and when they would finally get their due. They did not disappoint, either in their villainy or in their comeuppance. ;) This is the 4th book in the series, but it worked just fine as a standalone. It's not at all obvious who here might have even been in previous books (Ruth's sister, maybe?) so going into it not knowing anything about the rest of the series books wasn't an issue at all for me. Rating: 3 1/2 stars / C+ I voluntarily reviewed an Advance Reader Copy of this book.
beckymmoe 8 days ago
The Bewildered Bride is a sloooooow moving/slow burn second chance romance (though only one character actually is aware of their second chance status for 80% of the book!) that has a whole lot going on besides the romance. Revenge. Secrets. A hidden identity. Tragic and often-horrific pasts. A fatherless child who may or may not be illegitimate... So. Much. Going. On. Ultimately, The Bewildered Bride had a very sweet ending, but goodness, it took so much to get us all there. Adam kept his true identity hidden from Ruth way longer than he should have--I lost count of how many times she thought goodness, this [add in a thing about the baron here] reminds me so much of Adam! or his [fill in aspect of his person/personality here] is just like Adam's! Seriously, it was near constant, and soooo frustrating. She also did an awful lot of waffling between wanting to be with him--he made her feel so safe and protected!--and not trusting him at all and pushing him away. All part of being a "bewildered bride" I guess? The alternate first person POV (Ruth's) and third person (Adam's) was a bit disconcerting; I never did fully get used to it. The drama with Adam's relatives, who were the villains of the story from start to finish was solid, though, and kept me turning the pages to find out just how many evil deeds they were capable of and how and when they would finally get their due. They did not disappoint, either in their villainy or in their comeuppance. ;) This is the 4th book in the series, but it worked just fine as a standalone. It's not at all obvious who here might have even been in previous books (Ruth's sister, maybe?) so going into it not knowing anything about the rest of the series books wasn't an issue at all for me. Rating: 3 1/2 stars / C+ I voluntarily reviewed an Advance Reader Copy of this book.
KelsieAL 11 days ago
The Bewildered Bride by Vanessa Riley is book four in her Advertisements for Love series. Though part of a series, this novel is a standalone, as are all the books in the series. Ruth Croome is a beautiful Blackamoor heiress. She abandons her childhood dreams of her wedding and elopes with handsome Adam Wilky. The couple is brutally attacked and each believes the other is dead. Adam is sold into impressment with the Navy but vows to return and avenge his wife. Adam returns under his real name, which he had never revealed to Ruth. They develop a friendship that could progress to the great passion they had before, if Ruth can be convinced to overlook Adam’s deception. There are interesting plot twists throughout, but the story lost my attention briefly at times. Nevertheless, The Bewildered Bride is a very interesting multicultural romance. The author not only tackles the subject of interracial relationships, she delves even deeper and broaches the highly sensitive subject of racial passing. Riley has done her research and presents an accurately detailed historical depiction. I rate this novel 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it to lovers of romance, especially historical romance. I have already purchased and plan to read the previous books in the series. My thanks to Entangled Publishing, LLC and NetGalley for the opportunity to read an advance copy of this book. However, the opinions expressed in this review are 100% mine and mine alone.
Mimiphilly 11 days ago
This ARC was courtesy of netgalley - all thoughts and opinions are mine and unbiased I had to read this all in one go - couldn't put down - I became emotionally involved from page one right to the end No spoilers - but there is a trauma - the author has done a wonderful job of presenting the trauma through the heroine, Ruth - but I did find it upsetting and - won't lie - there were tears - very satisfying !! I love a romance I can get involved in !! A second chance romance - this was a lovely read - I recommend to anyone who loves their romances with a little bittersweetness to them
NadineTimes10 12 days ago
I appreciate authors who can amaze me in little ways. It doesn't necessarily have to be big, blaring plot twists, but remarkable turns of phrase and gripping imagery can go a long way. This author's style keeps me on my toes. Now, I'll admit the unpredictable rhythm in parts of this novel made the emotional flow a bit difficult to follow at times, so I couldn't always make heads or tails of the characters. But the hero and heroine are interesting people who work well together for this story. Their romantic chemistry and physical relationship are prominent and intense but nothing R-rated. I particularly empathized with some of Ruth's frustrations over personal injustices and relished a moment leading to the climax where she truly stands up. However, I had to suspend my disbelief to go along with one of the major plot points that doesn't quite add up. Although I've not read any of the other novels in this series yet, this book stands alone just fine, and I couldn't resist it—not with that divinely grape, stunning book cover. And I "flew" through the entire read in a day. Quite a rare occurrence for me and novels of this length. _________ I received a complimentary copy of this book via NetGalley, and I've given an honest review.