ISBN-10:
0807854069
ISBN-13:
2900807854067
Pub. Date:
10/07/2002
Publisher:
The University of North Carolina Press
Company They Kept: Migrants and the Politics of Gender in Caribbean Costa Rica, 1870-1960 / Edition 1

Company They Kept: Migrants and the Politics of Gender in Caribbean Costa Rica, 1870-1960 / Edition 1

by Lara Putnam

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 2900807854067
Publisher: The University of North Carolina Press
Publication date: 10/07/2002
Edition description: 1
Pages: 320
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 1.25(h) x 9.00(d)

About the Author

Lara Putnam is associate professor of history at the University of Pittsburgh and author of Radical Moves: Caribbean Migrants and the Politics of Race in the Jazz Age.

Table of Contents


Acknowledgments Introduction
1. The Evolution of Family Practice in Jamaica and Costa Rica
2. Sojourners and Settlers: Economic Cycles and Traveling Lives, 1850s-1940s
3. Las Princesas del Dollar: Prostitutes and the Banana Booms, 1890s-1920s
4. Compañeros: Communities and Kinship, 1920s-1950s
5. Facety Women: Rudeness and Respectability, 1890s-1930s
6. Men of Respect: Authority and Violence, 1890s-1950s Conclusion Appendix

What People are Saying About This

Catherine C. LeGrand

A vivid, beautifully written, sophisticated, and insightful book. By focusing on the intersections of gender, migration, work, community, and the subjective dimensions of honor and violence, Putnam provides an entirely new perspective on the history of the banana region of eastern lowland Costa Rica. (Catherine C. LeGrand, author of Close Encounters of Empire: Writing the Cultural History of U.S.-Latin American Relations)

From the Publisher

A vivid, beautifully written, sophisticated, and insightful book. By focusing on the intersections of gender, migration, work, community, and the subjective dimensions of honor and violence, Putnam provides an entirely new perspective on the history of the banana region of eastern lowland Costa Rica. The book will interest historians and sociologists of gender, of labor, of the Caribbean and Central America, of the African diaspora, and of comparative banana regions.—Catherine C. LeGrand, McGill University



Full of case histories and graphic descriptions of daily life, Putnam's study puts a human face on the history of a boom and bust plantation economy. The result is a dramatic social and cultural history of migration, community formation, and economic development that will broaden readers' perspectives on the regional history of the western Caribbean.—American Historical Review



"An engaging and stunningly well-written work that dissects invented traditions with powerful anti-essentializing effects. In this welcome brand of social history we learn just how culture and values interact with choice and individual personality, quite without much in the way of the State policy or intervention usually thought to shape the arena of family values. Putnam is as 'facety' as her best subjects in showing just how fluid and changing both cultural values and gender roles can be in migrant communities of all kinds.—Lowell Gudmundson, Mount Holyoke College



[The Company They Kept: Migrants and the Politics of Gender in Caribbean Costa Rica] is also truly innovative in its use of gender in rethinking race relations and ethnic identities in Costa Rica. . . . This is a terrific book. It is well researched, well written and analytically sophisticated.—Journal of Social History



A book . . . that will change the way we think about the histories of the Caribbean and Central America.—International History Review

Lowell Gudmundson

An engaging and stunningly well-written work that dissects invented traditions with powerful anti-essentializing effects. In this welcome brand of social history we learn just how culture and values interact with choice and individual personality.(Lowell Gudmundson, author of Costa Rica Before Coffee)

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