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The Crunk Feminist Collection
     

The Crunk Feminist Collection

by Brittney C. Cooper (Editor), Susana M. Morris (Editor), Robin M. Boylorn (Editor)
 

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For the Crunk Feminist Collective, their academic day jobs were lacking in conversations they actually wanted—relevant, real conversations about how race and gender politics intersect with pop culture and current events. To address this void, they started a blog. Now with an annual readership of nearly one million, their posts foster dialogue about activist

Overview

For the Crunk Feminist Collective, their academic day jobs were lacking in conversations they actually wanted—relevant, real conversations about how race and gender politics intersect with pop culture and current events. To address this void, they started a blog. Now with an annual readership of nearly one million, their posts foster dialogue about activist methods, intersectionality, and sisterhood. And the writers' personal identities—as black women; as sisters, daughters, and lovers; and as television watchers, sports fans, and music lovers—are never far from the discussion at hand.

These essays explore "Sex and Power in the Black Church," discuss how "Clair Huxtable is Dead," list "Five Ways Talib Kweli Can Become a Better Ally to Women in Hip Hop," and dwell on "Dating with a Doctorate (She Got a Big Ego?)." Self-described as "critical homegirls," the authors tackle life stuck between loving hip hop and ratchet culture while hating patriarchy, misogyny, and sexism.

Brittney Cooper is an assistant professor at Rutgers University. In addition to a weekly column in Salon.com, her words have appeared in the New York Times, the Washington Post, Cosmo.com, and many others. In 2013 and 2014, she was named to the Root.com's Root 100, an annual list of Top Black Influencers.

Susana M. Morris received her Ph.D. from Emory University and is currently an associate professor of English at Auburn University.

Robin M. Boylorn is assistant professor at the University of Alabama. She is the author of the award-winning monograph Sweetwater: Black Women and Narratives of Resilience (Peter Lang, 2013).

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
10/10/2016
The brilliant founders of the Crunk Feminist Collective bring together some of their website’s most popular and thought-provoking essays on race, sisterhood, sex, and pop culture. As “hip-hop-generation feminists of color,” the authors describe their politics as a “remix” incorporating the best of multiple movements, offering a truly diverse, intersectional series of viewpoints. They subvert paradigms—maligning stereotypes such as the “angry black woman” and the “side chick,” while also supplying useful neologisms such as blackgirl and disrespectability politics. They take on black masculinity, “infighting” liberals, and misogyny in rap lyrics, and more personal subjects, including infertility, child abuse, and depression. Cooper’s perspective as a born-again Christian is particularly nuanced, as she discusses the church’s “harmful gender ideology,” homophobia, and insularity. Cooper also penned a heartbreaking plea for justice after the death of Trayvon Martin and a brilliant defense of ratchet culture as the antithesis of the “pathology of... respectability.” Another highlight contributor, writing under the pseudonym Crunkista, relates an infuriating incidence of racial profiling by mall security. Beyoncé is given ample space, as is Nicki Minaj and prolific showrunner Shonda Rhimes. These essays are extremely relevant, educational, and a genuine pleasure to wrestle with. The range of subject matter and myriad voices is representative of a new wave of vibrant and multifaceted feminism, at home in the academy and the beauty parlor. (Jan.)
From the Publisher

“Our favorite sister bloggers.” —Elle.com

“A valuable record of the collective’s contributions to a growing cultural awareness of feminist issues and criticism, particularly for women of color.” —Kirkus

"Witty, digestible passages. . . . the writings, although unmistakably political, speak to the personal with familiarity, honesty, and focus." —Booklist

“By centering a Black Feminist lens, The Collection provides readers with a more nuanced perspective on everything from gender to race to sexuality to class to movement-building, packaged neatly in easy-to-read pieces that take on weighty and thorny ideas willingly and enthusiastically in pursuit of a more just world.” —Autostraddle

"The pieces made me laugh from my gut, cry for hours, and really reckon with the fact that there will be no freedom, no liberation, no American deliverance without a wholehearted embrace of crunk feminist consciousness. One of the most important books I have ever read." —Kiese Laymon, author of Long Division

"We are made better because of these scholars-in-sisterhood and their collective commitment to live, love, dance, desire, dissect, imagine, challenge, and give testimony. I'm 'bout it!" —Janet Mock, author of Redefining Realness

"A must-read for anyone interested in feminist discourse produced by Black women from the hip hop generation." —Beverly Guy-Sheftall, author of Words of Fire

"Erudite, revolutionary, and most definitely crunk, this book is poised to become a classic tome of feminist writing that speaks to many generations to come." —Gwendolyn D. Pough, author of Check It While I Wreck It

Kirkus Reviews
2016-12-19
A collection of feminist essays on sex, gender, pop culture, politics, and friendship.Originally founded in 2004 by three like-minded graduate students at Emory University, the Crunk Feminist Collective was revived in 2010 as a blog and outlet for the members' opinions, cultural analyses, and personal stories in the age of digital feminism. Bringing together their most popular posts from 2010 to 2015, the book is a diverse assemblage of essays, missives, rants, and confessions. Though the pieces range in style and subject matter, they all mix a deeply passionate and intellectual backbone with informal, accessible language that addresses feminist issues of gender, politics, and race and racism. Before delving into these topics, the collection includes a mission statement, manifesto, and an introduction to getting crunk, which proclaim the group's mission to "create a space of support and camaraderie for hip hop generation feminists of color, queer and straight, [with]in the academy and without," and define crunkness as "our commitment to feminist principles and politics." Their "mode of resistance" is to rail against patriarchal power structures, defend and humanize Black Lives Matter, and dissect African-American representation in the media. (There are several essays on Beyoncé.) The group also tackles sensitive personal subjects for communities of color, such as coming out, reproductive rights, and mental health. The writers of the collective exhibit an extraordinary breadth of intellectual range, but their critiques often favor anecdotal evidence rather than a more substantive argument. Nonetheless, there is plenty to provoke thought, and the collection serves as a call to action for enlightenment-seekers. The editors also include a "Crunk Glossary" to define relevant terms, including "genderqueer" and "misogynoir," which "refers to the unique hatred that Black women and girls experience in American visual and popular culture." A valuable record of the collective's contributions to a growing cultural awareness of feminist issues and criticism, particularly for women of color.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781558619432
Publisher:
Feminist Press at CUNY, The
Publication date:
01/10/2017
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
322
Sales rank:
166,430
Product dimensions:
5.90(w) x 8.90(h) x 0.80(d)

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Meet the Author


Brittney Cooper is Assistant Professor of Women’s and Gender Studies and Africana Studies at Rutgers University. Her forthcoming book Race Women: Gender and the Making of a Black Public Intellectual Tradition (University of Illinois Press) examines the long history of Black women’s thought leadership in the US, with a view toward reinvigorating contemporary scholarly and popular conversations about Black feminism. In addition to a weekly column on race and gender politics at Salon.com, her work and words have appeared at the New York Times, the Washington Post, Cosmo.com, TV Guide, the Los Angeles Times, Ebony.com, The Root.com, MSNBC’s Melissa Harris-Perry Show, All In With Chris Hayes, Disrupt with Karen Finney, and Third Rail on Al-Jazeera America, among many others. She is also a co-founder of the Crunk Feminist Collective, a popular feminist blog. In 2013 and 2014, she was named to the Root.com’s Root 100, an annual list of Top Black Influencers.

Susana M. Morris is co-founder of the Crunk Feminist Collective and a contributing writer on the blog. She received her Ph.D. from Emory University and is currently an associate professor of English at Auburn University, where she teaches African American literature. Her book, Close Kin and Distant Relatives: The Paradox of Respectability in Black Women’s Literature, was published by the University of Virginia Press in February 2014.

Robin M. Boylorn is Assistant Professor of Interpersonal and Intercultural Communication at The University of Alabama. She received her Ph.D. from University of South Florida in 2009. She is the author of the award-winning monograph Sweetwater: Black Women and Narratives of Resilience (Peter Lang, 2013), and co-editor of Critical Autoethnography: Intersecting Cultural Identities in Everyday Life (Left Coast Press, 2014).

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