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The Hemingway Thief
     

The Hemingway Thief

4.0 1
by Shaun Harris
 

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“[A] stellar debut…. Filled with charming pop-culture references, this deft caper novel is by turns laugh-out-loud funny and poignant.”            
Publishers Weekly STARRED REVIEW 

Novelist Henry “Coop” Cooper is contemplating a new book between sipping rum

Overview

“[A] stellar debut…. Filled with charming pop-culture references, this deft caper novel is by turns laugh-out-loud funny and poignant.”            
Publishers Weekly STARRED REVIEW 

Novelist Henry “Coop” Cooper is contemplating a new book between sipping rum and lounging on a Baja beach with hotel owner Grady Doyle. When Grady tries to save a drunk from two thugs, Coop tags along for the sake of a good story. The drunk is Ebbie Milch, a small-time thief on the run in Mexico because he has stolen the never-before-seen first draft of Ernest Hemingway’s A Moveable Feast from a wealthy rare book dealer.

The stolen manuscript is more than just a rare piece of literary history. It reveals clues to an even bigger prize: the location of a suitcase the young, unpublished Hemingway lost in Paris in 1922. A year’s worth of his stories had vanished, never to be seen again. Until now.

But Coop and Grady aren’t the only ones with their eyes on this elusive literary prize, and what starts as a hunt for a legendary writer’s lost works becomes a deadly adventure. For Coop this story could become the book of a lifetime . . . if he lives long enough to write it.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
★ 05/16/2016
Henry “Coop” Cooper, the narrator of Harris’s stellar debut, is thinking about murder—of his own pseudonym. When his first literary novel is widely panned, he turns to writing vampire romance novels under an assumed name—which are immediate bestsellers, to his unending shame and his agent’s glee. In remote Pendira, Mexico, Coop is taking a break on his agent’s orders, when he and Grady Doyle—the new owner of the dive hotel and bar Coop inhabits—interrupt the beating of a grifter, Ebenezer Milch, who has quite the story to tell. In Paris of 1922, an uncle of Milch’s stole the legendary suitcase containing Ernest Hemingway’s papers, and now a book collector with nefarious ties and hired assassins is after the suitcase. Coop winds up traveling across cartel-laden Mexico in a battered RV with an ex-DEA agent, a former hit man, and Milch in search of the suitcase, finding himself out of his depth at every turn. Filled with charming pop-culture references, this deft caper novel is by turns laugh-out-loud funny and poignant. Agent: Brent Taylor, Triada US Literary Agency. (July)
Kirkus Reviews
2016-05-05
The theft of an original Hemingway manuscript leads to the possible discovery of the author's famous lost briefcase full of stories in this south-of-the-border caper. Henry "Coop" Cooper is an American writer making a tidy living off a series of novels about a Scottish vampire detective. Like many a hack before him, he's planning the novel that will finally bring him serious literary credibility. At the Mexican backwater where he's taken refuge, Coop and the ramshackle resort's equally ramshackle owner, Grady Doyle, hear the tale of a thief who has purloined an original manuscript of Hemingway's A Moveable Feast and, with it, what he believes to be clues to the location of a legendary cache of lost Hemingway writings. Their chief adversary is a ruthless rare-book collector out for blood as well as the goods. The bloodthirstiness of collectors is not a bad inspiration for a thriller, and the general tone of sarcasm and dissolution, along with characters who seem to be wisecrackers more than tough guys, are some of the elements you might want in a shaggy dog tale of pursuit. But, at least in terms of its tone, this novel is written with a confidence it hasn't earned. The plot construction is shaky and often confusing, the characters ready with a quip but not particularly engaging in themselves. Some thrillers have and some have not. This is one of the latter.
From the Publisher
"Filled with charming pop-culture references, this deft caper novel is by turns laugh-out-loud funny and poignant." ---Publishers Weekly Starred Review

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781633881754
Publisher:
Prometheus Books
Publication date:
07/19/2016
Pages:
240
Sales rank:
687,201
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.20(h) x 0.60(d)

Meet the Author

Shaun Harris grew up in New England and has a degree in American studies and film and television from the University of Notre Dame. He now lives in rural Wisconsin with his wife and two kids.

AudioFile Earphones Award winner Eric Michael Summerer is a voice actor and producer who has narrated numerous audiobooks as well as countless instructional recordings and video games. He earned an Audie Award nomination for Childhood's End by Arthur C. Clarke.

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The Hemingway Thief 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
literarymuseVC More than 1 year ago
Henry “Coop” Cooper despaired of ever writing a best-selling novel until he turned to writing torrid romance novels under a pseudonym. They instantly become best sellers, yet Coop is disgraced by this popularity. Taking a break, he travels to Mexico where he meets a calculating drunk, Ebbie Milch, who is running from enemies because he possesses a stolen manuscript and other papers of Ernest Hemingway. Years ago, Hemingway’s wife, Pauline, was supposed to bring a suitcase of all Papa Hemingway’s writings to him when the suitcase holding these gems was stolen. Hemingway, we know from history, never got over that loss, especially because it occurred before he became famous. Now, the papers are worth thousands of dollars, if the manuscripts and papers Milch has are the “real deal.” However, that simple plot isn’t really the essence of Harris’ novel. To Milch, who manages to drag Coop everywhere in his mad schemes, these papers have a familial connection. Now, joined with an ex-DEA agent, this trio travels across Mexico, coming close to being killed several times but escaping from those hair-raising moments with a type of slap-stick comedic routine at each disastrous challenge. It’s even suggested that Hemingway may have been involved in the “theft,” maybe. Harris offers the reader a window in which to see Hemingway’s brief disastrous participation in WWI and his desire ever-afterward to be a part of war. The Hemingway novels are clearly a series of dramas of the writer’s observations but really acting out of vicarious battles, romances and dramas. The Hemingway Thief is a compelling read where the reader must deduce what is real and what is comedic fraud. High drama mixed with comedic satire makes for a genuinely intriguing read! Nicely envisioned historical fiction!