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The Lost Code (Atlanteans Series #1)
     

The Lost Code (Atlanteans Series #1)

3.9 209
by Kevin Emerson
 

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Kevin Emerson’s The Lost Code, first in the Alanteans series, tells the story of a near-future earth ravaged by global climate change. Owen Parker is about to learn that it isn’t the first time the planet has been near destruction. Owen’s ancestors were part of an ancient race whose advanced technology once almost destroyed the

Overview

Kevin Emerson’s The Lost Code, first in the Alanteans series, tells the story of a near-future earth ravaged by global climate change. Owen Parker is about to learn that it isn’t the first time the planet has been near destruction. Owen’s ancestors were part of an ancient race whose advanced technology once almost destroyed the world.

With the help of a mysterious, enchanting girl named Lily, Owen will have to understand his history and his genetic code to prevent global annihilation. He will also have to leave the bio-dome that keeps him safe and brave the post-apocalyptic wasteland beyond.

Teens fascinated by the dark dystopian world of Divergent and mythology of the Percy Jackson series will want to read The Lost Code.

Editorial Reviews

Peter Lerangis
“The Lost Code will stop your heart with scenes of passion and power, as it draws you in to a group of kids who are the only hope in a dying world of artifice and desperation. What happens to them is like nothing you’ve ever read.”
Bulletin of the Center for Children’s Books
“The broad strokes of conflict and characterization make this a movie-ready action flick at heart...an accessible entree to the dystopia trend.”
Michael Grant
“A smart dystopian adventure packed with mind-blowing fantasy and characters you’ll love.”
Bulletin of the Center for Children’s Books
“The broad strokes of conflict and characterization make this a movie-ready action flick at heart...an accessible entree to the dystopia trend.”
Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books
"The broad strokes of conflict and characterization make this a movie-ready action flick at heart...an accessible entree to the dystopia trend."
The Bulletin for the Center for Children's Books

“The broad strokes of conflict and characterization make this a movie-ready action flick at heart...an accessible entree to the dystopia trend.”

Publishers Weekly
Emerson (Carlos Is Gonna Get It) launches the Atlanteans series with a novel that blends post-apocalyptic, SF, and paranormal elements into a summer camp story. In a future in which climate change has rendered most of the planet uninhabitable, teenage Owen has gotten a rare scholarship to Camp Eden, where privileged kids and survivors of cryogenic freezing can experience a simulation of the biosphere of old. When he almost drowns, he discovers the camp's hidden secret: Owen and a handful of others (including his crush, Lilly) have developed gills and can breathe underwater. Owen is thrilled by his new abilities and sense of belonging, but when a child at the camp dies under mysterious circumstances, it becomes apparent that something sinister is occurring at Camp Eden. As Owen and friends attempt to figure out who to trust, they uncover more conspiracies about both the camp and the state of the world. Emerson throws perhaps a little too much into the book, but the high-stakes narrative moves forward with momentum, and a romance between Owen and Lilly is gracefully unveiled. Ages 13–up. Agent: George Nicholson, Sterling Lord Literistic. (May)
VOYA - Jennifer McIntosh
Owen is just a normal kid living underground in the mines to escape the deadly sun in a dystopian future with a limited ozone layer when he is picked to attend the exclusive Camp Eden. Camp Eden is protected from the sun by a huge dome set up to mimic the outside world—with its own sun, moon, stars, clouds, and ecosystem. On the surface, things seem pretty good at Camp Eden, but when weak swimmer Owen survives ten minutes under water without breathing, things start to get weird. Owen's neck is mysteriously gashed, and the only thing that soothes the gashes is being under water. Owen soon learns that he is part of a special race of people, the Atlanteans, called upon to rescue the world and fix a mistake made thousands of years ago. The first in a new series, The Lost Code will satisfy teens' thirst for post-apocalyptic dystopian novels with just the right amount of suspense, adventure, science fiction, fantasy, and romance, but without the brutal violence found in other stories. Readers will eagerly devour Owen's tale and look forward to its continuation. Reviewer: Jennifer McIntosh
School Library Journal
Gr 8–10—In a postapocalyptic world in which water is scarce and sunlight kills, privileged teenagers still enjoy the opportunity to attend summer camps. These camps are set up in giant domes that protect the inhabitants from radioactivity and allow everyone within to pretend that everything is fine. Owen is a poor kid from Hub whose father entered him into a drawing, and Owen won. During a swim on his second day of camp, Owen drowns… but he doesn't die. Instead, he begins to change in unexplainable ways, and he soon learns that he's not the only one. When he begins to talk to some of the other campers, he learns that over the years, students have vanished and their disappearances have been conveniently explained by the staff. He also learns that the dome is beginning to fail. This book examines a postapocalyptic world from a different perspective, because all the action takes place in a setting that closely resembles any summer camp one might visit today. However, underneath the varnish of swimming holes, archery ranges, and mess halls, there is the truth that the Earth is dying. Owen is an awkward teen-not a natural hero. Even though his body is metamorphosing into something strange and he's being called to fulfill an ancient quest, he's still a self-conscious guy, trying to get the girl to like him. The ending of the book leaves plenty of room for the sequel, and readers will likely be intrigued enough to continue.—Heather M. Campbell, formerly at Philip S. Miller Library, Castle Rock, CO
Kirkus Reviews
Coming-of-age story meets conspiracy thriller at a summer camp in a post–climate-catastrophe world. During his first full day at Camp Eden Owen drowns. In the 10 minutes he's underwater before lifeguard (and Owen's crush) Lilly rescues him, he survives by sprouting gills. Camp Eden exists in a distant future wrecked so severely by global warming that it must be contained in climate-controlled BioDome. Owen's disastrous introduction to the camp is normal for him--he isn't a privileged full-time dome resident, but a kid who won a lottery to attend camp, socially awkward and physically weak. Lilly warns him not to reveal his gills to the staff and invites him into the counselor-in-training clique for secret swims with their shared mutations. Investigating the camp--why would letting the camp director know about the gills be dangerous?--leads to his discovery that the dome is close to failing, as well as hints at a larger scheme that will doom or save the world. The conspiracy hinges on Owen. Minor social conflicts fail to ramp up enough tension until the long-awaited main plot begins in earnest--more than halfway through--bringing high stakes. The plot suffers from the pacing, but it ends with a big finish. Between Owen, likable in his thoughtfully awkward way while evolving into a hero, and the lovingly crafted setting, Camp Eden offers summer escapism. (Science fiction. 11-17)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780062062802
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
04/23/2013
Series:
Atlanteans Series , #1
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
435
Sales rank:
663,045
Product dimensions:
5.20(w) x 7.80(h) x 1.20(d)
Age Range:
13 - 17 Years

What People are Saying About This

Peter Lerangis
“The Lost Code will stop your heart with scenes of passion and power, as it draws you in to a group of kids who are the only hope in a dying world of artifice and desperation. What happens to them is like nothing you’ve ever read.”
Michael Grant
“A smart dystopian adventure packed with mind-blowing fantasy and characters you’ll love.”

Meet the Author

Kevin Emerson is the author of the The Last Day on Mars and The Oceans between Stars, The Fellowship for Alien Detection, the Oliver Nocturne series, the Atlanteans trilogy, Breakout, and Carlos Is Gonna Get It. A former science teacher, Kevin is also a drummer and singer, most recently with his bands Northern Allies and The Board of Education. He lives in Seattle, Washington. You can visit him online at www.kevinemerson.net.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

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The Lost Code: Book One of the Atlanteans 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 209 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
What an amazing little surprise this book was! It is quite the page turner! Can't wait for the rest of the trilogy to come out!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I was hesitant to write this because I think reviews should be about the book, but I didn't know where else to put it. I agree with you 100%, that is why I won't read any book/movie review that is longer than a few sentences. The very instant I see "so and so did this, then; or "it starts with so and so doing" I quit reading. I belive the sellers need to screen the reviews and weed out those that want to retell the whole story because I want to read the authors story not someone elses version. Please B&N can't you be the first to do this for your customers?
MaddieG More than 1 year ago
This book HAS to be better than any other I've read, the way it's written makes it impossible to pull away from it. It's filled with amazing adventure and heart stopping thrill. Lost Code became a family favorite, even for the little siblings. They often play "mermaid" games and have become addicted to the pool. Overall, I'd recomend this book to anyone, of any age!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I was really good and creative with some imagination but it was somewhat predictable. :/
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book exceeded expectations. Story revolves around teenagers but shouldn't be considered just a YA offering. It's intriguing, and as soon as you think you know where its going, something surprises you. I will definitely be reading the next book in the series.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
If you loved the adventrous books like Percy Jacksons or even Hunger Games, this book is totally recommended.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Great book. Def reccomend this one if you liked Percy Jackson and vice versa.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Very creative. Thuroghly enjoyable.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I am halfway through and will continue reading. I am curious as to where it is going, but I am pretty sure I have an idea. The story is interesting. However, the main character from whose point of view this is written is annoying.... really annoying. He also seems boring and harps on his little love interest wayyy too much; I am tired of hearing about her. If it was not for that, I MIGHT give 4 stars.
OldGringoWM More than 1 year ago
Couldn' get through the first chapter. I believe there is an audience for this fiction. I'm just not a part of that audience.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
.......and for regular old adults like myself as well. A classic coming-of-age story with the young, adorably geeky, hero, Owen, that will appeal to anyone who has ever felt like an awkward outsider and longed to find their place in the world. This is a PG-rated read that is appropriate for the 8-16 age group, though the story and characters make this a highly engaging book for all age groups. With a blend of modern technology, old world mythology, and sci-fi fantasy, the author has created a fascinating and oddly realistic world that will have you waiting in line for book 2 of the series. If you're a fan of Percy Jackson, Hunger Games, Harry Potter, and/or Indiana Jones, then this is the book for you!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This was a free friday book and i really enjoyed it. The author did a lot of research before writing this. The science and mythology are spot on. A very enjoyable easy summer read with suspense, mystery and a little coming of age romance.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Entertaining
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It was so interseting could nit put it down. I cant wait until the second one!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is great book. I was pulled in at the first chapter and enjoyed the ride. I am not a child, nor have a ever been a teenage boy but it the point of literature to get another persons point of view and this author made it all quite clear. Thank you to Kevin Emerson
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is one of the free Friday books that I actually like! Thanks B&N c:
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book's main characters are teenagers and I'm a 40-something year old adult but I still thoroughly enjoyed this book! It's well-written and I wasn't able to put it down! I'll be purchasing book #2 in this series!
StephanieTiner More than 1 year ago
In a world of chaos, it's nice to let off a little steam, that's why there is Camp Eden in the EdenWest biodome. Her children and teens can experience all the joys of camp the way it used to be before the ocean failed and the oceans rose. Owen Parker has won a spot at Camp Eden for one month of pure camp fun, but not everything is as it would seem. Everything in Owen's life has changed, all starting when he drowned at the beginning of camp. Now he must figure out what is really going on at Camp Eden, and more important, how to make it out alive. I liked this book. This book begins in the middle of the action and keeps you in suspense throughout, giving you just enough to keep you reading without giving it all away too early. I must admit that there are some things that I did not like about this story. First of all, Owen goes through a sort of change at the beginning of the story and just as I was getting used to what it was, sorry about the vagueness but I don't want to spoil it for you, the author took it away. That annoyed me because I thought it was a really unique twist, unlike any of the other dystopian fantasies I have read recently. I also found some things greatly disturbing, things I also can't say any more about without huge spoilers. This is a difficult review for me to write because everything that I liked or disliked is extremely important to the story and I can't tell you about them without ruining the book. As A whole I am happy that I read this book, I believe it is a great edition to my library and I hope to read more of the series very very soon. I would recommend this to teens and adults that enjoy theorizing about Atlantis. I think my Mom would love this book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
One of the reviewers seems to think that genetics can only be carried directly. Sometimes genes skip generations or come up randomly. Twins for example normally skip generations. Twins can/ may pop up if one of their grandparents had a win. Also, so what if the characters have gills? Its the way the author wrote it. All in all, finally, to make my statment clear, i will point out that if the story is good, forget the technicalities and enjoy it.