The Lying Planet

The Lying Planet

by Carol Riggs

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Overview

The Lying Planet by Carol Riggs

Promise City. That’s the colony I’ve been aiming for all my life on the planet Liberty. The only thing standing in my way? The Machine. On my eighteenth birthday, this mysterious, octopus-like device will scan my brain and Test my deeds. Good thing I’ve been focusing on being Jay Lawton, hard worker and rule follower, my whole life. Freedom is just beyond my fingertips.

Or so I thought. Two weeks before my Testing with the Machine, I’ve stumbled upon a new reality. The truth. In a single sleepless night, everything I thought I knew about the adults in our colony changes. And the only one who’s totally on my side is the clever, beautiful rebel, Peyton. Together we have to convince the others to sabotage their Testings before it’s too late.

Before the ceremonies are over and the hunting begins.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781633757578
Publisher: Entangled Publishing, LLC
Publication date: 09/19/2016
Sold by: Macmillan
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 366
Sales rank: 478,945
File size: 2 MB
Age Range: 12 Years

About the Author

Carol Riggs lives with her husband in southern Oregon, USA. She enjoys reading, drawing and painting, writing conferences, and appreciates music and dance of all kinds. You will usually find her in her writing cave, surrounded by her dragon collection and the characters in her head.

Read an Excerpt

The Lying Planet


By Carol Riggs, Stacy Abrams

Entangled Publishing, LLC

Copyright © 2016 Carol Riggs
All rights reserved.
ISBN: 978-1-63375-757-8


CHAPTER 1

Right after morning sessions end on Friday, the scavenger team brings a charred body into the safe zone.

I'm heading down the walkway with my terraform class when I see the dingy yellow of the team's coveralls. My first impulse is to bolt. But since we're expected to check out the sight when it happens, we gather on the pavement like a herd of reluctant sheep. Other students join in as my girlfriend, Aubrie McKennis, reaches for my hand. All around us, smiles vanish and conversations halt while everyone stares at dried blood and crusty blackness.

Who died this time?

The thought hangs heavy in my mind as I step toward the body on the stretcher. By the build, I can tell it's a guy, despite the signs of genomide poisoning showing through the clear body bag. And now that I'm closer, I can see who it is under the blood-caked soot. It's Mick Garinger. There's no mistaking the wide nose, the mouth that has gone slack. Acrid odors of grease and sulfur fill the air.

Nausea rolls in my gut. Not long ago, Mick was kicking up his feet on the training room desks, harassing shy girls, picking fights with guys, and speeding around the zone on his hoverbike, terrorizing little kids. Not to mention the fire he set in the commander's front yard last year. With that track record, I wasn't surprised when Mick failed his Testing and got banished from Sanctuary.

My gaze locks onto the half-visible B seared onto his forehead. That branding is a silent reminder that banishment from a safe zone equals death.

The head of the team folds his tanned arms and surveys us one by one. "We found Mick in the outer zones. What's left of him. We'll take him to the incinerator complex after we unload our cargo."

No one responds. There won't be any services or stirring words said for a banished guy. Just a stark warning of the stakes. Swallowing hard, I look away from the four men standing on the pavement. I don't envy the team's job. Foraging for supplies and equipment is one thing — finding dead bodies is another.

Aubrie buries her head in the space under my jaw. "Let's go, Jay. I've seen enough."

I guide her away from the stretcher. We thread through our crowd of friends, passing troubled faces, watery eyes. Murmurs and mutters continue behind us.

"That was awful," Aubrie says in a near whisper, twenty meters down the street. "Only four months out there, and look at him."

"The bombed colonies in the outer zones must still be thick with fallout," I say. "If it would just rain here like the trainers say it does on Earth, it might help clear the dust."

"Well, I wish the team wouldn't bring the bodies back to our zone. It seems risky, even in decontamination bags."

"I guess the bags are sealed well." I grimace. Although Mick was a jerk, he didn't deserve to die like that. No one deserves to be slow-burned by a chemical dust that sifts into pores and settles into lungs. I hope after the team is done here they won't cart Mick to the primary education compound for a grisly show-and-tell, but they probably will. Once or twice a year, whenever they find a body, they make the rounds. I hate the idea of my two little sisters seeing something that gross.

Aubrie's slender fingers tense in mine. "Now that we're really close to leaving the safe zones, it feels scarier to see a dust-burned body. It doesn't matter if we're going to the other side of the mountains. Promise City is still in the outer zones."

I'm not going to admit I'm as shaken as she is, or she'll be even more freaked out. Both of us have taken less than a dozen work-project trips to the other two safe zones, and nowhere else past their borders. So what do we really know about what's out there? I shrug. "I don't see why it wouldn't be safe. Promise City sounds like a great place to live. No one wants to come back to boring old Sanctuary after their trial year."

She gives me a tight, crooked smile. "Or else everyone's dead."

"Hey, don't be negative," I say, pushing down my own doubts. "If everyone were dead, the leadership board wouldn't want us to live there, and no one would be left to fly the airships to come get us. We wouldn't be getting letters from my brother and your sister saying how awesome it is over there. We'd hear about it if people were getting sick and dying. Besides, Promise City was built after the War. It has to be dust-free." I nudge her with my shoulder.

Her answering grunt is subdued.

When we reach the preschool compound, I pull her close and give her a kiss. It's like embracing a limp pillow — as though viewing Mick's body has taken the muscles and bones right out of her. "See ya at the Nebula for dinner," I say, keeping my tone light.

"Okay, see ya." She gives me a half smile and a small wave.

As she walks away, her reddish-brown hair flows behind her, almost reaching her curvy hips. Her question about leaving scrapes at my brain. Has seeing Mick scared her so much that she's doubting the plan we've had for the last year? She can't get spooked just two short weeks before I leave. We're too close to my Testing, too close to the freedom we'll finally have when she Tests two weeks after me. Soon we'll be exploring new places, far from the drudgery of the safe zones. Farewell at last, Sanctuary, Refuge, and Fort Hope. She can't change her mind now.

A sleek black utility hover-vehicle cruises along the street, and I snap my hand up in a salute. Sir, yes sir! The commander graces me with a brisk nod and a rusty smile out the driver's window. Our zone leader owns the best of the twenty-two prized UHVs in the zone. His nose is like a hatchet, his eyes shrewd and vigilant.

Two lieutenants ride with him, part of his leadership board. Their heads turn like oiled machinery to watch me on the permawalk. They smile, too.

The vehicle continues down the central street, its ludmium-powered engine nearly silent. After another minute, a hoverbus transport glides past, hauling secondary students for the afternoon sessions — kids who do their community service in the mornings. Laughter, words, and shouts spill from the opened windows. I peel off my jacket, all at once too warm in the early summer sun. I know what gruesome scene awaits those students on the street by the education compound. They won't be happy much longer.

My steps quicken as I try to outrun the thought. I pass the supply station and the food center, then the database hub and the Nebula. And on the next street past the medical center ... I veer left for a detour. I always have a morbid curiosity for this place, but it's magnified by the scavenger team's fresh reminder of what will happen if I fail like Mick did. As I cross the springy plushgrass of zone square and reach the covered indoor stadium, my heart kicks into high gear.

Inside the enormous building, I walk by rows of empty bleachers. My footsteps slow as I near an imposing apparatus.

The Machine.

A full three meters tall, the Machine's silver arms flare out from a single seat, making it look like a predatory mutant octopus. A plexifiber dome encloses and protects it. A biolock secures access to the dome. It looks almost alive, as though it's waiting, sleeping ... conserving energy until it's time for the graduation ceremony.

Shivers crawl down my arms. Eerie as it is, the Testing Machine is my ticket out of Sanctuary. It'll show what I've contributed to the zone and prove I'm worthy to join the colony of Promise City. Thanks to the uncanny way it judges us — and the Board rewarding high scores and threatening banishment for low ones — productivity has skyrocketed. The Machine boggles my mind. For the last six years it's been here, ever since kids were eighteen and old enough for the Testing to start up, it has held the power of life and death on this planet.

Literally.

A rowdy whoop echoes around the stadium, making me flinch.

"Hey, Lawton, ogling the beast?" a deep voice calls. "Making sure it's recording every single one of your dedicated community services?"

I turn to find one of my friends wearing a helioball cap walking into the building. Nash Redmond. A ludmium-powered pruning device and a maintenance bucket dangle from his hands. Two of our other friends are on landscaping duty with him, carrying tools and wearing gloves. Leonard walks beside him, his lanky form mimicking Nash's casual walk, but Peyton copies no one. Her petite, tomboyish body moves toward me with purpose. Her uniform is mismatched, an orange shirt paired with dark blue pants.

"Hey, Nash," I say. After what we've seen at the education compound, I don't know how he can act normal, almost cheerful. I give Peyton a half smile. "Why are you still hanging out with these guys?"

She grins, her slightly crooked teeth crisp and white against her naturally brown skin. "They're insane. I adore insanity."

"I hope you don't regret it." I toss a meaningful glance at the Machine, and it's not reassuring that she shrugs. She's changed over the seasons, gone renegade. Ever since that one Harvest Equinox party two years ago, when we stopped hanging out. Now she skips education sessions with Nash and Leonard and works at community service only long enough to log in her required hours. I doubt she'll flunk and get banished, but she won't score very high. Apparently the Machine doesn't spur everyone into being more productive.

"Peyton doesn't care, so why should you?" Nash asks me. "All we need to do is pass the Testing, not reach superhero-level scores. Take me, for instance. Do I look worried? No, because tomorrow at my ceremony, I'm gonna pass."

"Yeah," Leonard adds with his scratchy, needling voice. "You really have to pull some serious brainvoids to get banished. Like setting fire to the commander's front yard." Unable to help himself, he breaks into a wheezy cackle.

"Dude, that was priceless." Nash laughs. "Mick the rebel man. Too bad he didn't make it out there in the outer zones."

The emergency station's blaring siren rushes into my memory, along with the five days of sanding and refinishing it took to help fix the irathon-fiber exterior of the commander's dwelling unit. Nothing too hilarious there. Sure, Commander Farrow is a militant psycho taskmaster and no one except the lieutenants and the other adults like him much. But like the commander always says, a higher cause demands higher discipline in our post-War life.

Speaking of which, I need to get to my community service. "Gotta go. Good luck tomorrow night, Nash."

"No worries," Nash says. Beside him, Leonard snickers and gives a loud belch.

"Bye, Jay." Peyton's brown eyes settle on me in a gaze that almost looks mournful.

My eyes lock with hers. A jolt hits me from head to toe. With a shake of my head, I break the spell and hurry from the building, away from a strange, powerful wash of not-rightness that flows over me. What did that expression mean — pity? Does she think I'm so focused on work that I don't have any fun? It's a tricky balance. Our best bet for doing well after we graduate is to score high and get as many rewards as we can at our Testing. To earn a UHV or a cloudskimmer, like I'm aiming for. To own something valuable once we're free of this zone.

Unless Peyton's sad gaze means she misses hanging out with me like we used to when we were younger. Racing our hoverbikes, climbing trees, playing tag with water pistols in the summer, laughing and cracking jokes together ...

Yeah. It's easy to miss all that, but I'm not going to think about things that can't be changed.

Reaching the gardens, I fling my jacket over my hoverbike that's docked by the entrance. I stroll past the office. Beyond the domed greenhouses, the gardens spread out across the countryside, with new sprouts poking up everywhere. They're mostly Earth varieties that adapted well to this soil and climate, sprinkled in with a few native Liberty plants. Farther out, the wheat fields stretch for acres. The musty smell of dirt mixed with cow-manure fertilizer seeps into my nostrils as a yar-fly buzzes past my face.

Dad appears from behind a supply outbuilding. "Grab a shovel, son," he calls. His black beard is a stark contrast to his yellow shirt. "We're planting tomatoes."

"Coming." I nab gloves and a shovel. Dad leads me to a prepped area where quarter-meter-high fledglings sit in pots, clustered like shy, leafy infants. Mom and a pair of green-uniformed workers appear, carting more tomato pots from the greenhouse.

"There you are, Jay," Mom greets me, pushing back a strand of hair that has loosened from her ponytail. "Did you see the burned body at the education compound?"

Like usual, somehow she already knows about the scavenger team's find. Gross news travels fast. And she's always so flippin' casual about it. "Don't remind me," I mutter.

Mom throws me a smile, her hazel eyes softening. "It's a difficult thing to see. But I'm glad you're pushing on, continuing to work. You always set such a good example for the other kids."

"Uh, thanks." She's handing out her normal excess of motherly encouragement. The workers, two fourteen-year-old girls, giggle and send me sideways looks, eyeing the muscles on my arms, whispering loudly about my "gorgeous jawline" and "sexy thick hair." Um, right. Warmth spreads across my face, making Mom laugh as she walks away to continue working. I clear my throat, grab a pot, and get down to the business of tomato planting.

Mick's face haunts me as I work. The matted hair by the red welted B on his forehead. His pale lids closed forever. Yeah, those War-ravaged, abandoned colonies in the outer zones must still be contaminated, even after twenty-five years of ceasefire. At least those colonies are on this side of the ridge, in the western valley. I hope Aubrie's not right about what's east of the Corveira Mountains. If those lands are laced with genomide dust like the rest of the outer zones, it doesn't matter that Promise City has wireless communication, holographic movies, music stored on micro-discs, and all that other great advanced technology we've been told about.

Dad plunks a pair of tomato plants next to my boots. "Special delivery."

I grab one and ease it from its pot. "Dad, does anyone know for sure if it's dust-free on the other side of the Corveiras?"

"The exposure is tested down to possible traces." He ignores my shovel, scraping aside rich black dirt with his gloved hands to make a hollow bed for my plant. "Just like here in the safe zones. Relax. No place on the planet is totally dustless, because of the winds, but no one would stay there if it were toxic. The only thing you need to do is focus on Testing well, so you're not stuck in these zones any longer than you want to be."

That's good to hear. It's also great of Dad to support me even though I'll be leaving soon and creating a big hole in our family. I wish he didn't love this backward zone so much. All five of us could move to Promise City where my brother, Chad, lives. He loves it there, and the way he describes it in his letters sounds awesome. Not that I want to be under Mom and Dad's smothering care any longer than I have to, but if they lived there, my sisters would be a lot closer whenever I wanted to visit. "Yeah, I definitely need to snag a skimmer so Aubrie and I won't have to wait around for an airship."

With a somewhat wistful smile, Dad dusts his hands together. "Don't worry. I hear there's a cloudskimmer in Fort Hope reserved in your name."

I grin. Fabulous. The higher-ups have confidence in my ceremony results. I'm totally going to enjoy learning to fly that skimmer while I wait for Aubrie to join me.

Three hours later, I stretch my back muscles and put away my gloves. I hang the shovel in the supply outbuilding to keep the rising waters of the nightly ground-swells from rusting the metal. With my jacket tucked into my hoverbike's rear compartment, I pedal down the road, gliding just above the pavement. My speed whips the air into a cool breeze across my face and arms, rippling my shirt over my chest.

Hoverbikes may be a majorly prehistoric form of transportation, but mine gets me where I want to go. It responds like magic to my pumping legs. No fuel required, like I'm part of the smooth metal and the circling track propulsion and the hand grips. It's more than the "robust" exercise the Board members say it's good for.


(Continues...)

Excerpted from The Lying Planet by Carol Riggs, Stacy Abrams. Copyright © 2016 Carol Riggs. Excerpted by permission of Entangled Publishing, LLC.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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The Lying Planet 4.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 8 reviews.
NicoleLambertAuthor More than 1 year ago
NOTE: I received this book for free in exchange for an honest review. The first thing that I would like to say is that this book was nothing like anything I've ever read before. I enjoyed how it was still classified as YA, but it did not follow the typical YA formula that you tend to see in a lot of YA books. The imagery regarding the aliens was extremely grotesque, and their purpose with the humans sent chills down my spine. In all honesty, I could barely tear myself away from this book for even a moment. Not only was the pacing good, but the characters were very relatable. Within this book, you had a wide spectrum of characters, from the always-follows-the-rules type people to the rebellious ones. Also, the world that the author created was very well-thought-out to the point where it seemed real, and I especially enjoyed how within each of the individual safe zones, not including the aliens, they were set up sort of like a dystopian lifestyle (I am admittedly a sucker for anything dystopian). Overall, I really enjoyed this book, and I would recommend it to anyone who is a fan of sci-fi and horror.
Faerie-bookworm More than 1 year ago
Title: The Lying Planet Author: Carol Riggs Genre: Young Adult, SciFi, Dystopian Format: Ebook, NetGalley Pages: 285 Rating: 5 Heat: 2 Thoughts: Wow, wasn't expecting that!! I assumed there were aliens but didn't even come close to figuring out what they were doing until I got to that part, and all I'll say is ewww. Very easy story to get pulled into, nothing is as it seems so it's a page turner. You've been warned, if you don't start this early in the day you will be up late finishing it. So far I have enjoyed every book I've read by Ms. Riggs and look forward to reading more! Please note that I received a complimentary copy of this work and chose to write a review.
aly36 More than 1 year ago
I enjoyed this book very much. It is always interesting to me to pretend or dream with authors about what the world can be in the future. I think this book is a bit Sci-fi but I see the creativity in it as well. Living on a planet that you thought you knew and finding out it is all lies is a hard pill to swallow for sure. Who would want it to screw up you whole life? The book has some great twists and exciting things happen. I enjoyed it! * I received this book from Netgalley and this is my honest review*
UndertheBookCover More than 1 year ago
Thanks to Entangled Teen for providing me with a copy of this book in exchange for review! Okay, I have to admit, I wanted to read this book because of the cover. I mean, can you blame me? This cover is beautiful! The synopsis did catch my attention as well, because this sounded like a recipe for a creepy cult on another planet and I am all about creepy cults, let's be honest. While this did take me a lot longer to read than pretty much all of the books I've read lately, I was pretty happy with the direction that this book took and am hoping there is a sequel in the future! The Lying Planet follows Jay Lawton, a seventeen-going-on-eighteen year old that lives on the planet Liberty in the safe zone colony of Sanctuary. His whole life has been spent doing good deeds and trying to raise his Testing score in the hopes of getting to go to Promise City once he turns eighteen. But only two weeks before his Testing date, Jay stumbles upon something he never could have imagined that turns his whole world upside down. Now, he has to work to help save the other kids in Sanctuary before their Testing date so that they don't succumb to the same fate of their siblings. I don't want to give too much away about this book, because I feel like the twist is something that everyone needs to experience for themselves. I will admit that I definitely didn't see it coming and it really got me more interested in the book and the fate of the characters. However, looking back on it now, I feel like it should have been fairly obvious to anyone who was actually paying attention. I had a pretty hard time getting into it at first, and it didn't really pick up for me until about chapter five. Even then, I feel like the pacing of the book was a bit slow. But despite the slow feeling I got, I still enjoyed reading it and I really feel like it's a creative and different young adult science fiction book. The character development of Jay was a lot of fun to read about and I feel like it was a really big part of the book. Jay starts off as a rule follower who is determined to make the best score at his Testing in order to go to Promise City and even goes above and beyond his normal duties in order to do better. In honesty, he started off as a relatively boring character and I believe that may have been a reason as to why it took me so long to finish this book. Not because I disliked it, but because I didn't feel Jay was a strong character and he wasn't fun to initially read about. Once he found out the truth about the adults of Sanctuary, he really seemed to step up and grow into this normal rebellious teenager. It was actually quite fun to read about him doing all of these crazy things to reduce his score. His final act of defiance to the Commander was fantastic and had me cracking up at the idea of it. When he finally decided what he was going to do about the Testing and such, I think that he really started to grow as a character. By the end of the book, he was definitely stronger and more independent and I really enjoyed where he ended off as a character. The plot was something that I felt was pretty unique and was a refreshing change from some of the typical science fiction books that I come across. Full review at: http://underthebookcover.blogspot.com/2016/10/book-review-lying-planet-by-carol-riggs.html
onemused More than 1 year ago
"The Lying Planet" begins with Jay, who is almost 18 and ready for his testing as is the custom on this planet settled by people from Earth. He lives in one of the safe zones with his parents and two little sisters. His older brother had gotten a high score on his testing and left for the big city 6 years before to never return. The Testing is based on goodness, quality, and hard work. Jay has been working hard at school, staying out of trouble, and volunteering with all his spare time to get a high score. The higher the score, the more benefits you'll get as you take the next step (guns, cars, etc.). Jay has a plan with his girlfriend Aubrie to get a lot and live happily ever after in the new city. If your score is too low, you will be banished from the cities and left to parish from genomide dust, which is left over from a war (seems like nuclear winter). A couple weeks before his own testing, Jay's life changes. It begins with the banishment of two people, Blake and Shelly. They both had seemed to be doing so well, so it comes as a shock when their scores are so low. Soon, Jay is learning some hard and dangerous truths that will affect him forever. I won't say more than that so as not to give spoilers. This book really surprised me- every twist shocked me and was unexpected. Jay is an easy to understand character, dreaming of his future and working his hardest to achieve it. It was captivating and really makes you think about the practices in our lives which match those applied in the story. It's suspenseful and easy to get lost in Jay and his friends' lives. I really hope to see more from the author, hopefully with these characters. Please note that I received this book from the publisher through netgalley in exchange for my honest review.
TheThoughtSpot More than 1 year ago
Thanks to Entangled Publishing for the arc of The Lying Planet by Carol Riggs! Jay lives in a community that honors integrity and intelligence. The young people strive to live up to the high standards so they won't be banished when they are eighteen. One night Jay discovers the sinister intentions of the adults in the community and he struggles to convince others and that's when the chills begin. Complex characters, suspense and the insidious story make this an interesting read - 4 stars!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I would like to thank the author and publisher for letting me read this in exchange for an honest review. Jay Lawton is your typical teen who does good deeds in and around the colony he's lived in on planet Liberty. And for good reason. His Testing is coming up, and The Machine will either have him banished or released to the most popular haven on Liberty: Paradise City, where all the high-scoring teens get to live out their peaceful days as renowned citizens. However, things take a turn for the worse with Jay discovers a horrifying truth about the adults in his colony that changes everything he ever knew...and it's up to him and his rebel friends to save themselves and even the entire colony from certain death for unearthing this terrible secret. Wow. I have to admit. This wasn't what I was expecting. Actually, I didn't know what to expect, but the plot twists in this book took me for a wild ride. Even though a few of my theories were correct. While I loved all the characters, except for Aubrie, since I'm still upset at what she did to Jay, Jay , though, has to be my favorite. Here's your goody-two-shoes who wants to lick boots to have the highest score on The Machine. Well, that all turns to mush as soon as he discovers the LIE he's been living. And then his personality and character change because of it, but in a good way. And the truth he discovers is very disturbing. This book kinda reminds me of the movie The Island but under different circumstances and in a different universe. I highly recommend this to scifi lovers. While it did start out a tad bit slow, as soon as Jay discovers the truth, I couldn't put the book down. I had to know what was going to happen next. And Carol's prose is just perfect. Her words just flow and take on a life of their own.
DiiMI More than 1 year ago
Study hard, they said. Be kind, have honor and trust in the system and you will be given your pass to Promise City, where your whole life will lay ahead of you like a midnight buffet. Jay Lawton was every parent’s dream, an excellent student, never getting into trouble, a rule follower, so two weeks before he was to take “The Test” when he turned eighteen, everyone expected a one of the highest scores ever, including Jay. It it all changed one night and his world went from an almost Utopian existence to the most horrific nightmare a child could imagine and there was no one to turn to, except his peers. Too bad few were trustworthy enough to either believe in his words or at least not go running to the adults, the very beings that terrified Jay. Was it possible to undermine “The Test” and not be sent to Promise City? If one failed and were exiled, what then? This is Jay’s story and his fight for the survival of his fellow students. How much would you sacrifice to save your friends? What about your family? Carol Riggs’ The Lying Planet is young adult science fiction at its best as one boy keeps a level head in the face of death and deceit for the sake of humanity’s future. And you thought your parents were evil because they lied to you about the Easter Bunny? Hang on tight as the tension ramps up, and the race is on for survival against the odds as teens are forced to come of age and make the hard decisions no child should have to make. I received an ARC edition from Entangled: digiTeen in exchange for my honest review.