The Returning (Seer Series #3)

The Returning (Seer Series #3)

by Rachelle Dekker

Paperback

$14.39 $15.99 Save 10% Current price is $14.39, Original price is $15.99. You Save 10%.
View All Available Formats & Editions
Eligible for FREE SHIPPING
  • Get it by Friday, September 21 , Order now and choose Expedited Shipping during checkout.
    Same Day shipping in Manhattan. 
    See Details

Overview

The Returning (Seer Series #3) by Rachelle Dekker

They say the Awakening is coming.
That she’s the key.

But can she find her identity in the light
Before she perishes in the dark?


Twenty years have passed since Carrington and Remko Brant’s baby, Elise, was kidnapped and they were forced to leave her captive in the Authority City. Though they fled with the Seers far from Authority reach, they’ve never given up hope of rescuing their daughter from the man who betrayed them. Now Authority President, he’s ushered the city into a new era of “peace”—one where the Scientist Roth Reynard’s Genesis Serum has eradicated all memory of emotion or rebellion.

But the mysterious Aaron and his Seers are once again on the move, threatening the illusion the Authority has worked so hard to build. As the Seers send seven chosen warriors to rescue Elise and bring restoration to the Authority City, the lines are drawn for a final battle between light and darkness. The key to ultimate victory may rest within the strangely powerful girl who has felt forgotten but was never abandoned—a truth she’ll need to wage war against the powerful forces of evil.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781496402295
Publisher: Tyndale House Publishers
Publication date: 01/17/2017
Series: Seer Series , #3
Pages: 432
Sales rank: 219,067
Product dimensions: 5.50(w) x 8.10(h) x 1.10(d)

Read an Excerpt

The Returning


By Rachelle Dekker

Tyndale House Publishers

Copyright © 2016 Rachelle Dekker
All rights reserved.
ISBN: 978-1-4964-0229-5


CHAPTER 1

Trylin City sat against the monstrous mountain that served as its protecting spine. What was once a myth was now a functioning sanctuary for all those called to live outside the Authority City. Tall and majestic, the mountain's rocky peak shielded the city from sight and offered healthy soil at its roots, fresh spring water from its depths, indestructible stone for the walls, and a constant sense of security.

The morning was in full swing through the city streets, excitement swimming through the air. Everyone knew what today represented.

Carrington sat on her bed, the windows pulled closed. She wanted a moment to herself before the rest of the day dragged her into its depths.

A small cardboard box sat to her right. Folded paper filled its insides — letters and reminders of her past. Secrets she kept from everyone, even Remko. She glanced down at the unfolded letter she held between her fingers. It trembled as her eyes drank in the words once more.

November 12, 2260

My dearest Elise,

My heart is heavy today. Sometimes I fear that it will weigh me down with such ferociousness that I will never be able to walk again. I know that letting this pain cripple me hurts all those around me, but I can't seem to see through the darkness long enough to take hold of the light. I can see the hopelessness in your father's eyes. He has no idea how to help me; I hope he knows that I don't blame him for that. How could he possibly rescue me from this?

If I'm being honest, I'm not sure I want to be rescued. Would I even deserve to be happy after what I've done to you? Aaron sits with me often and tells me to remember and trust in the power that holds you. A power that cannot be threatened, that cannot be harmed, and at moments I feel that power as well. It allows me small moments of peace, but then I think of the power holding you close and I wish it were me. I find myself envious of the power and then angry that I've lost you and then shame because I let you be taken.

Do you hate me for that? You must. Are you suffering because I failed you as a mother? I have to stop my mind from wandering too far down the dark road that brings visions of what terrible things could be happening to you. If I go too far down that path, I will surely not survive.

Today is worse because today you turn two years old. I wonder if you're talking yet. What have you learned to say? I imagine you walking about, your legs finally growing strong enough to keep you steady, your mind full of questions about the world around you. Who is watching you grow? Who is teaching you?

It should be me.

Please forgive me for not being there. Please forgive me, for I will never forgive myself.

Your mother


Carrington clenched her eyes tightly to capture her tears and hold them back. She knew rereading these letters only brought pain, but after all these years of suffering it somehow felt comforting as well. More often than she'd like to admit, she'd steal away, pull out all the letters she'd written to her lost daughter, and read them, hoping, for just a moment, to be reconnected with her.

Carrington could hear the excitement building outside. The music had started. Voices of jubilation filled the air, and children's laughter echoed against the mountain, thrilling anticipation pulsing against the city walls. For weeks people had been preparing for today. For years they had been dreaming about this moment.

The prophecy was unfolding, and the time had come for them to send out the chosen Seven who would bring about the Awakening. The ones who would cross the wilderness back to the Authority City and finally bring the evil regime to its knees.

She whisked away the few tears that had escaped down her cheeks and folded the letter back into the box. She replaced the lid and moved to store it deep within her closet.

Moving to stand in front of the mirror, Carrington surveyed herself. She was dressed in plain tan slacks, a white button-down shirt, and her favorite navy cargo jacket. Her hair was pulled back and secured at the nape of her neck, showing her face clearly. Looking at herself, she noticed how time had changed her skin. There were lines in places that had once been smooth, wrinkles where the skin had been tight, and discoloring where it had been clear.

The physical changes didn't bother her usually, but now she found herself struggling to pull her mind away from the differences as she stared at her reflection. Not because she wished she looked different; more because it meant that twenty years had really passed to lead them to this moment. Twenty years of change and aging since she'd stood on the outskirts of the Authority City and left her daughter behind.

Another round of tears threatened to descend, and she took a deep breath to chase them away. She needed to clear her mind if she was going to survive today. She shouldn't have reached for those letters. She ran her hands along the sides of her jacket and questioned her clothing choice. It was a ceremony after all; maybe she should have worn a dress?

Carrington could feel the tremble starting again in her hands and she took another deep breath, moving away from the mirror. Her head swam with emotion and she tried to shake it free. She glanced at the clock on the wall and knew Remko would be expecting her any moment. She didn't have time to change into anything else, so she supposed what she was wearing was going to have to do. Moving through the motions of her typical routine, she turned off the lights, rechecked the closed window, locked the door, and descended the front staircase onto the street.

All around her were faces of people she knew. They smiled and waved, pure joy dancing across their expressions; Carrington waved back, masking the panic and worry building behind her own.

Each step toward Trylin's city center, where the ceremony was being held, was familiar. Carrington's legs had traversed this route hundreds of times. But they felt heavy, as if they knew this time the walk was different.

She was about to step off the main paved road into an alley to collect herself when a strong arm wrapped itself around her. Carrington turned to see Lucy Carson smiling at her. Carrington eased a bit and returned a genuine smile.

Lucy looked so much like her mother, Selena; the girl was now in her thirties, with bold, dark features and stunning black hair. Her eyes, however, mirrored those of her late older sister, Arianna, to whom Carrington owed so much.

Like Arianna, Lucy had an incredible gift of intuition, something she'd learned to tap into as she'd grown in the truth of the Father and spent time learning at Aaron's feet. She was filled with peace and beauty beyond her years, and staring at her now, Carrington couldn't deny her envy.

"How are you?" Lucy asked.

Carrington fought off the urge to divulge all her hidden worry to the woman and merely smiled.

Lucy nodded and pulled Carrington closer as the two women slowly walked the road toward the main gathering. "That's what I thought."

"You shouldn't be here. Lesley will be in a panic," Carrington said.

Lucy gave a soft chuckle and shrugged. "I'm on my way. I just thought I'd check on you first. I know that while this day marks something phenomenal for most of us, it's clouded with fear for you."

"I'm fine, Lucy," Carrington lied. She could feel the girl's eyes on her and suddenly wished to be invisible. She knew even as Lucy opened her mouth to speak that she was going to have to work very hard to keep her walls up around her storming emotions.

"It happens in a flash, like a sneaky fox — suddenly the truth of your identity is replaced by the illusions of your mistakes," Lucy said softly. She paused and nodded to herself before a small smile caught her mouth. "Arianna used to say that to me, and I never understood what she meant."

Carrington could see pain working its way into Lucy's expression.

"She said so much to me in those last few months that sounded like madness," Lucy went on. "I remember desperately wanting to understand. I knew she was upsetting my parents. They would fight over how to handle her rebellion, as they called it, and I knew that if she didn't stop she was headed for trouble."

Lucy paused for a moment, her eyes staring down at her feet as they continued slowly toward their destination. "I went to her once. It was late; I was supposed to be in bed, but I couldn't sleep. I was too worried. I begged her to change, to obey the rules, to listen to our father, to be the girl she once was. I cried and asked her to do it for me, to think about me, because I couldn't lose her. Even then, I knew they would take her from me if she continued.

"She cried too. The bedroom was dark, but I could clearly see her face glistening with tears and broken from pain but with such resolve in her eyes. I remember because it was hard to make eye contact with her. I'd never seen her so sure of anything. Then she walked over to me, knelt so that our faces were close, softly brushed her thumb across my cheek, and said, 'My sweet Lucy, I am doing this for you.'"

Carrington's chest ached and she wished she could think of something to say that might offer some consolation, but she came up empty.

"After Arianna's execution, I felt completely responsible. She'd done this all for me — she'd even told me so. We were sisters, and I was supposed to protect her. The shame I carried around beat down on me internally until I bled."

"Lucy, that was not your fault," Carrington said.

"Just as Elise being taken was not yours," Lucy said.

Carrington stopped in her tracks, all images of Lucy and Arianna clearing from her mind. "That is totally different."

"Is it?" Lucy asked. "And now, with Kennedy leaving with the chosen Seven, do you carry blame for that also?"

Carrington swallowed hard against the tight ball forming in her throat. Images of both her daughters filled the space behind her eyes. "I am their mother."

Lucy gave Carrington's arm a squeeze and Carrington fought back the tears threatening to escape. "No, Carrington, their mother is a role you play, but it is not who you are. Like a sneaky little fox, suddenly the truth of your identity is replaced by the illusion of your mistakes."

Carrington wanted to pull away from Lucy's touch and hide in a dark place, but the younger woman's grip was solid and the truth of her words kept Carrington's feet in place.

"Let go of the grievances you hold against yourself, and know all that has happened and will happen is held under the power of the Father. The light that has been our strength will never fail us."

The tears Carrington had been holding back slid down her cheeks and the tremble in her hands resurfaced. Thoughts of her daughters collided inside her head. The one she'd watched grow into a beautiful, independent, secure woman, and the other she'd only dreamed of. One she'd held too closely because she'd let the other be taken. One who now wanted to leave in hopes of rescuing the other, but all Carrington could think about was losing them both.

Lucy slid her hand up to Carrington's shoulder. "Remember who you are. Who Elise is and who Kennedy is, and who calls them His own."

Carrington knew Lucy was right, but acknowledging that truth would mean giving up her right to be angry and afraid, and she wasn't ready to do that. She wanted to tell Lucy so, wanted to claim Lucy wasn't a mother so she couldn't possibly understand what she was asking Carrington to do, but a loud pounding rhythm filled the air and drowned out her unspoken words.

The ceremony drums had started. The two of them were very late.


(Continues...)

Excerpted from The Returning by Rachelle Dekker. Copyright © 2016 Rachelle Dekker. Excerpted by permission of Tyndale House Publishers.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

The Returning 4.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 21 reviews.
Faerytalemegan 3 months ago
This book really surprised me in a good way! I didn't think I would enjoy it as much as I did. I really liked the different themes that were Biblically related throughout. I definitely wouldn't say it's supposed to be an allegory to Christianity or anything. I loved the fast-paced story with the heart pumping adrenaline. I want to thank Tyndale Publishers and Rachelle Dekker for the complimentary copy of this book for review and for judging during the INSPY awards. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I express in this review are my own. This is in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s CFR 16, Part 255.
annelr More than 1 year ago
The Returning by Rachelle Dekker is the third book in her futuristic YA Seer series. It comes off well as a stand alone novel but reading the first two books in the series will provide a better background for the storyline of The Returning. I liked the book as the action was relatively fast paced and there were some actual 'no that did not just happen' scenes that kept the pages turning! A prominent theme of good and evil, i.e., light and darkness, is evident throughout the book and the battle between the two brings a lot of satisfactory and interesting tension to the book. The characters are strong and evocative, calling up a variety of emotions as the reader follows them on the journey on which we all embark...the search for ourselves. There are certainly Christian principles throughout the book (knowing who you are as a child of God and as such we are called to be a light to a dark world, practicing true forgiveness and choosing faith over fear--principles that encourage and guide) and yet one must remember this is a fictional story and not a theology book, not a book on which to base one's spiritual beliefs. All in all, The Returning was a compelling completion to a rather amazing debut series for this author. I received a complimentary copy of the book from NetGalley. A favorable review was not required and opinions are my own.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I have to admit I read Rachelle Dekker’s first book, The Choosing, because I was quite curious about her storytelling in light of her growing up as Ted Dekker’s daughter. However, it is her skill as a storyteller that brought me to read The Calling and The Returning. Rachelle definitely does not need to ride on her father’s coattails; she is an author with an eloquent voice of her own. The Returning is the third novel in Rachelle Dekker’s Seer series, and it leaves her reader longing for more, not because the tale is lacking, but because the reader will want to follow the characters and their future generations. The Seer series is a tale of forgetting and remembering, remembering who one is in the Father. It is a tale of letting go, surrendering, in order to gain that which is of the greatest value. It is a tale of great power, power that comes only with being filled with the Spirit of the Father, a Spirit we know comes through the Son. It reminds us that Light can always overcome darkness; it is never too late. The Returning is best read within the proper sequence of the Seer series. The story’s impact would likely be minimized as a stand-alone read. I would encourage you to take this journey. You will find it time well spent.
JLYoung More than 1 year ago
I came into this book not having had read the first 2. After reading this book I really do not have a desire to go back and read them. I had a really hard time continuing to read this book. There are some major theological flaws present. I tried to read it as just a work of fiction but the spiritual undertones were too strong to not pay attention to them. I had no problem with the intense focus on our identity: Who we are in Christ. What I couldn't get passed was this idea that everyone has the light and just needs to remember they have it. That God is in all of us from the beginning and we just forgot. That is simply not true. We are born sinners. Apart from God. We are full of darkness from the beginning. We aren't full of light. God is light and in him there is no darkness at all. So he can't be in us when we are in darkness. It isn't until God opens our eyes that we can see our sin and need of a savior. Then through acceptance of what Jesus did on the cross we can be freed from our darkness and saved. Then we are in the light. Then we can shine out the love of Christ to a lost dark world. I couldn't get over this as it played out throughout the entire story. Also, I didn't like the way the author quoted scripture as the characters words and didn't give reference to where it came from in the Bible. Not even a notation. I felt uneasy in my spirit reading this story. It felt new agey too. The story line wasn't developed very thoroughly (I do understand that it may have been more clear had I read the other 2 books. So I didn't let this affect me too much.). I did not care for this book at all. If you're going to have that much spiritual emphasis in a book make sure it's done in a way that is theologically accurate.
joyful334209 More than 1 year ago
Seeing the book for what it is - a good book that could lead someone to CHRIST. It is fantastic. It is the last book in a series of three - all leading up to one final battle of good versus evil - light versus dark. Carrington and Remko had a baby that they had to leave behind in the City but safe from enemy hands - her name is Elise - it has been 20 years - They have not stopped planning on going back and rescuing her from the man who lied to them - who also brought the city into a new era of peace and got a serum that got rid of all memories emotions and rebellion so they can rule over everyone - so you can see how there will be a showdown.....their journey is fierce and the fight is fiercer........what happens to Elise is unreal you have to read this book ya'll. I received this book from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.
ceciliadlynn More than 1 year ago
I have been excited to reach Rochelle Dekker’s books, as I have been a long-time fan of her father’s work. With that being said, I am a little upset with this novel. I noticed a few theological errors which is hard for me to look over. As a work of fiction it is a nice read, but there are some issues that a true believer cannot overlook. Rachelle Dekker has a unique writing style but this just wasn't her best work. I would recommend this for those who have a strong faith base and can distinguish between truth and fiction. I received a copy of this book from Netgalley for my honest review. All opinions expressed are my own.
Heart2Heart More than 1 year ago
It all boils down to the ultimate show-down between good and evil in a Christian Dystopian look into the future with Rachelle Dekker's Seer series in her final novel The Returning. Ancient prophecy has always pointed to a future event that most thought would never happen. A thing written about with no basis for coming true, at least to those living in Authority City. Anyone who opposes those in power or has any idea other that confirming to the well-being of all citizens is simply sent to the re-education center to be administered with a serum known as the Genesis Formula. It makes them comply without thinking for themselves and now they become part of the collective minds of those running the city. However, there is a band of rebels who have managed to leave the city despite all attempts to capture them. Within this band of fugitives are seven individuals who have been called to fulfill the prophecy of returning those in Authority city back to the way God had intended. Led by a man named Aaron who has shown them the ultimate way of living, no one knows if he is really a man or simply a figment of their over active imaginations. He has always shown them the real purpose of their lives and how those in power in Authority City have forced those in opposition to be re-educated or eliminated. He has uncovered the darkness that has been led to breed uncontrolled by those who have a sinister purpose in mind. Now Carrington and Remko Brandt have to put their trust in Aaron to lead this team of prodigals on their higher purpose to release those in bondage using their unique specialized gifts granted to them by God to redeem those who are lost in an effort to set them free and restore the city back to the grand vision God has for them. However it is a difficult decision for the Brandt's since their oldest daughter, Elise, was captured during a raid outside the city and it has been years since that day. Not knowing if she is dead or alive, they trust that their youngest daughter Kennedy whose has vowed to find her if she is still alive and bring her back home. Just when this team heads out back to the city to fulfill their prophecy, an army marches against those living in sanctuary waiting for their return to take them captive and force them to submit to the darker authority now controlling Authority City. I received The Returning by Rachelle Dekker compliments of Tyndale House Publishers and Net Galley. For fans of such series like Divergent and the Hunger Games, you will love this Christian take on a similar story line. Out of the entire series, I have to say my all-time favorite was The Choosing, the first novel. I love the different twist on the value people place on their looks and self esteem and how some were chosen and others who aren't are forced into a life of serving others within the city as outcasts. Dekker does an exceptional job at reminding readers between each novel what had happened prior so it is easy to pick up the action as you immerse yourself into each subsequent novel. This one was a bit predictable in some ways as you could figure out how things would need to be resolved before the series reached its conclusion. I would give this one a 4.5 out of 5 stars in my opinion however.
Theresa_Shell More than 1 year ago
I enjoyed the first two books of the series: The Choosing, and The Calling, even though I had a slight theological concern with each of them. In this final installment, the spiritual/theological aspect is much more prominent. I really like the theme of identity as a child of the Father's, and how the inner struggle of light and darkness is portrayed. I also like the Seer's process of learning to work together, and embracing their various supernatural gifts. However, there is a stronger spiritual theme of finding one's light within oneself that is not at all biblical, regardless of how many churches may embrace this form of religious syncretism. The Bible teaches that since sin was introduced into the world, humanity is born into sin, and then reborn in Jesus' death and resurrection. Jesus came to save the whole world; but we must receive his salvation in order to have the Holy Spirit inside of us. When an unbeliever looks into himself he will not find God, but must choose to receive God's calling, and die to himself. Dekker's characters are entirely focused on the light within themselves, and in all things, as the source of their identity and power. As a result, when the characters suffer, they go within themselves and are entirely self focused in a transcendent chat of beliefs (in line with Eastern religions, New Age, or modern psychology despite the "Christianese" language) rather than suffering in the example of the Christian Apostles (or Jewish Patriarchs) by looking to God and sanctifying His name in the midst of affliction. Dekker's spiritual metaphor is clear as she constantly quotes Scripture (often out of context). I cannot advocate this harmful theology, despite some of the other positive spiritual motifs. I also felt that the story itself was not as strong as it could have been. While there were moments of internal and/or spiritual struggle, the intensity of the suffering and conflicts were too shallow and unrealistic, the characters too often had overly simplified solutions to every problem, and the novel overall felt predictable, shallow, and preachy (of its poor theology). I received a complimentary copy of this book from Tyndale House Publishers.
ElizabethWalker More than 1 year ago
The Returning is the closing of a beautifully, well written series; one that has impacted my life and will for sure impact yours if you let it.
SemmieWise More than 1 year ago
“The Returning” (Seer series, #3) by Rachelle Dekker “It took me a long time to learn that faith’s purpose is not to release you from life’s trials. Faith gives you the strength to see the trial fully and know that this too shall pass. To hold nothing against the world or the trial before you. To practice true forgiveness.” Rachelle Dekker’s “The Returning” is a powerful and lovely conclusion to her Seer series. Taking place in 2278, 20 years after “The Calling,” this third and final installment follows the story of Elise, the daughter of Carrington and Remko and who had been kidnapped as an infant and raised in Authority City. “The Returning” tells the story of how Elise, along with The Seven, seven young members of the Seers each equipped with a special gift, will bring back the light and an Awakening to Authority City and all those who had been turned into emotionless, obedient beings by the city’s Genesis Serum. As Elise and the small group of seven battle the effects of Scientist Roth Reynard’s serum, and President Jesse Cropper’s inner battle between the evil dwelling within him and his love for Elise, the youngsters must learn to trust in the Father and the power of His light. “The Returning” is an incredible love story, with many amazing themes and lessons. It deals with identity, and knowing the truth of your identity and not allowing it to be replaced by the illusion of your mistakes; love and its power, and that the truest form of love sometimes is letting go; choosing faith over fear, and belief over doubt; reacting from our souls; and the light is greater than anything we face. Remembering is a huge theme to “The Returning” — remembering who we are, remembering who is within us, and remembering from where our power comes. As Elise says to Kane, her cousin and one of The Seven, “Life is a cycle of remembering and forgetting. The Father is in all and with all, and He tells me I am the light of the world. So if I believe His words are true and that we are all the same, created equal, and that I am the light of the world, then you must be too.” Aaron, who has been a teacher figure to the Seers since the beginning, is representative of Jesus, as he leads them toward the Father’s teachings, love and power. Wind is also a major theme throughout the book, indicative of the presence and power of the Holy Spirit. “The Returning,” and the Seer series in whole, is an amazing allegory of the gospel story — of God’s love and sacrifice for us, and His desire to draw us all in to Him and His love. Rachelle Dekker has hit another home run with the Seer series’ finale. I will caution, though, that this book is definitely not a standalone. I’d highly recommend you read “The Choosing” and “The Calling” first. I’m looking forward to what Ms. Dekker brings to us next. Five stars out of five. Tyndale House Publishers provided this complimentary copy for my honest, unbiased review.
SemmieWise More than 1 year ago
“The Returning” (Seer series, #3) by Rachelle Dekker “It took me a long time to learn that faith’s purpose is not to release you from life’s trials. Faith gives you the strength to see the trial fully and know that this too shall pass. To hold nothing against the world or the trial before you. To practice true forgiveness.” Rachelle Dekker’s “The Returning” is a powerful and lovely conclusion to her Seer series. Taking place in 2278, 20 years after “The Calling,” this third and final installment follows the story of Elise, the daughter of Carrington and Remko and who had been kidnapped as an infant and raised in Authority City. “The Returning” tells the story of how Elise, along with The Seven, seven young members of the Seers each equipped with a special gift, will bring back the light and an Awakening to Authority City and all those who had been turned into emotionless, obedient beings by the city’s Genesis Serum. As Elise and the small group of seven battle the effects of Scientist Roth Reynard’s serum, and President Jesse Cropper’s inner battle between the evil dwelling within him and his love for Elise, the youngsters must learn to trust in the Father and the power of His light. “The Returning” is an incredible love story, with many amazing themes and lessons. It deals with identity, and knowing the truth of your identity and not allowing it to be replaced by the illusion of your mistakes; love and its power, and that the truest form of love sometimes is letting go; choosing faith over fear, and belief over doubt; reacting from our souls; and the light is greater than anything we face. Remembering is a huge theme to “The Returning” — remembering who we are, remembering who is within us, and remembering from where our power comes. As Elise says to Kane, her cousin and one of The Seven, “Life is a cycle of remembering and forgetting. The Father is in all and with all, and He tells me I am the light of the world. So if I believe His words are true and that we are all the same, created equal, and that I am the light of the world, then you must be too.” Aaron, who has been a teacher figure to the Seers since the beginning, is representative of Jesus, as he leads them toward the Father’s teachings, love and power. Wind is also a major theme throughout the book, indicative of the presence and power of the Holy Spirit. “The Returning,” and the Seer series in whole, is an amazing allegory of the gospel story — of God’s love and sacrifice for us, and His desire to draw us all in to Him and His love. Rachelle Dekker has hit another home run with the Seer series’ finale. I will caution, though, that this book is definitely not a standalone. I’d highly recommend you read “The Choosing” and “The Calling” first. I’m looking forward to what Ms. Dekker brings to us next. Five stars out of five. Tyndale House Publishers provided this complimentary copy for my honest, unbiased review.
SemmieWise More than 1 year ago
“The Returning” (Seer series, #3) by Rachelle Dekker “It took me a long time to learn that faith’s purpose is not to release you from life’s trials. Faith gives you the strength to see the trial fully and know that this too shall pass. To hold nothing against the world or the trial before you. To practice true forgiveness.” Rachelle Dekker’s “The Returning” is a powerful and lovely conclusion to her Seer series. Taking place in 2278, 20 years after “The Calling,” this third and final installment follows the story of Elise, the daughter of Carrington and Remko and who had been kidnapped as an infant and raised in Authority City. “The Returning” tells the story of how Elise, along with The Seven, seven young members of the Seers each equipped with a special gift, will bring back the light and an Awakening to Authority City and all those who had been turned into emotionless, obedient beings by the city’s Genesis Serum. As Elise and the small group of seven battle the effects of Scientist Roth Reynard’s serum, and President Jesse Cropper’s inner battle between the evil dwelling within him and his love for Elise, the youngsters must learn to trust in the Father and the power of His light. “The Returning” is an incredible love story, with many amazing themes and lessons. It deals with identity, and knowing the truth of your identity and not allowing it to be replaced by the illusion of your mistakes; love and its power, and that the truest form of love sometimes is letting go; choosing faith over fear, and belief over doubt; reacting from our souls; and the light is greater than anything we face. Remembering is a huge theme to “The Returning” — remembering who we are, remembering who is within us, and remembering from where our power comes. As Elise says to Kane, her cousin and one of The Seven, “Life is a cycle of remembering and forgetting. The Father is in all and with all, and He tells me I am the light of the world. So if I believe His words are true and that we are all the same, created equal, and that I am the light of the world, then you must be too.” Aaron, who has been a teacher figure to the Seers since the beginning, is representative of Jesus, as he leads them toward the Father’s teachings, love and power. Wind is also a major theme throughout the book, indicative of the presence and power of the Holy Spirit. “The Returning,” and the Seer series in whole, is an amazing allegory of the gospel story — of God’s love and sacrifice for us, and His desire to draw us all in to Him and His love. Rachelle Dekker has hit another home run with the Seer series’ finale. I will caution, though, that this book is definitely not a standalone. I’d highly recommend you read “The Choosing” and “The Calling” first. I’m looking forward to what Ms. Dekker brings to us next. Five stars out of five. Tyndale House Publishers provided this complimentary copy for my honest, unbiased review.
SemmieWise More than 1 year ago
“The Returning” (Seer series, #3) by Rachelle Dekker “It took me a long time to learn that faith’s purpose is not to release you from life’s trials. Faith gives you the strength to see the trial fully and know that this too shall pass. To hold nothing against the world or the trial before you. To practice true forgiveness.” Rachelle Dekker’s “The Returning” is a powerful and lovely conclusion to her Seer series. Taking place in 2278, 20 years after “The Calling,” this third and final installment follows the story of Elise, the daughter of Carrington and Remko and who had been kidnapped as an infant and raised in Authority City. “The Returning” tells the story of how Elise, along with The Seven, seven young members of the Seers each equipped with a special gift, will bring back the light and an Awakening to Authority City and all those who had been turned into emotionless, obedient beings by the city’s Genesis Serum. As Elise and the small group of seven battle the effects of Scientist Roth Reynard’s serum, and President Jesse Cropper’s inner battle between the evil dwelling within him and his love for Elise, the youngsters must learn to trust in the Father and the power of His light. “The Returning” is an incredible love story, with many amazing themes and lessons. It deals with identity, and knowing the truth of your identity and not allowing it to be replaced by the illusion of your mistakes; love and its power, and that the truest form of love sometimes is letting go; choosing faith over fear, and belief over doubt; reacting from our souls; and the light is greater than anything we face. Remembering is a huge theme to “The Returning” — remembering who we are, remembering who is within us, and remembering from where our power comes. As Elise says to Kane, her cousin and one of The Seven, “Life is a cycle of remembering and forgetting. The Father is in all and with all, and He tells me I am the light of the world. So if I believe His words are true and that we are all the same, created equal, and that I am the light of the world, then you must be too.” Aaron, who has been a teacher figure to the Seers since the beginning, is representative of Jesus, as he leads them toward the Father’s teachings, love and power. Wind is also a major theme throughout the book, indicative of the presence and power of the Holy Spirit. “The Returning,” and the Seer series in whole, is an amazing allegory of the gospel story — of God’s love and sacrifice for us, and His desire to draw us all in to Him and His love. Rachelle Dekker has hit another home run with the Seer series’ finale. I will caution, though, that this book is definitely not a standalone. I’d highly recommend you read “The Choosing” and “The Calling” first. I’m looking forward to what Ms. Dekker brings to us next. Five stars out of five. Tyndale House Publishers provided this complimentary copy for my honest, unbiased review.
SemmieWise More than 1 year ago
“The Returning” (Seer series, #3) by Rachelle Dekker “It took me a long time to learn that faith’s purpose is not to release you from life’s trials. Faith gives you the strength to see the trial fully and know that this too shall pass. To hold nothing against the world or the trial before you. To practice true forgiveness.” Rachelle Dekker’s “The Returning” is a powerful and lovely conclusion to her Seer series. Taking place in 2278, 20 years after “The Calling,” this third and final installment follows the story of Elise, the daughter of Carrington and Remko and who had been kidnapped as an infant and raised in Authority City. “The Returning” tells the story of how Elise, along with The Seven, seven young members of the Seers each equipped with a special gift, will bring back the light and an Awakening to Authority City and all those who had been turned into emotionless, obedient beings by the city’s Genesis Serum. As Elise and the small group of seven battle the effects of Scientist Roth Reynard’s serum, and President Jesse Cropper’s inner battle between the evil dwelling within him and his love for Elise, the youngsters must learn to trust in the Father and the power of His light. “The Returning” is an incredible love story, with many amazing themes and lessons. It deals with identity, and knowing the truth of your identity and not allowing it to be replaced by the illusion of your mistakes; love and its power, and that the truest form of love sometimes is letting go; choosing faith over fear, and belief over doubt; reacting from our souls; and the light is greater than anything we face. Remembering is a huge theme to “The Returning” — remembering who we are, remembering who is within us, and remembering from where our power comes. As Elise says to Kane, her cousin and one of The Seven, “Life is a cycle of remembering and forgetting. The Father is in all and with all, and He tells me I am the light of the world. So if I believe His words are true and that we are all the same, created equal, and that I am the light of the world, then you must be too.” Aaron, who has been a teacher figure to the Seers since the beginning, is representative of Jesus, as he leads them toward the Father’s teachings, love and power. Wind is also a major theme throughout the book, indicative of the presence and power of the Holy Spirit. “The Returning,” and the Seer series in whole, is an amazing allegory of the gospel story — of God’s love and sacrifice for us, and His desire to draw us all in to Him and His love. Rachelle Dekker has hit another home run with the Seer series’ finale. I will caution, though, that this book is definitely not a standalone. I’d highly recommend you read “The Choosing” and “The Calling” first. I’m looking forward to what Ms. Dekker brings to us next. Five stars out of five. Tyndale House Publishers provided this complimentary copy for my honest, unbiased review.
Virginiaw More than 1 year ago
This book was the third and last book in the Seer series. I loved this series and this was a great ending. Elise learns many lessons before the end of the book. She learns what it means to be the light in this new world. There are good and bad people through this story. Will Elise be able to help the good and bad people. I received this book from Tyndale blog network for a fair and honest opinion that I gave of my free will.
booksandbeverages More than 1 year ago
Rachelle Dekker’s Seer Novels have intrigued me from the beginning and after reading the first two, I was eagerly awaiting the conclusion. While carrying the same thread of the previous two, it was still different enough to stand on its own. When I first saw that the story was going to take place 20 years after the second book, I admit I was a little nervous. Why such a long time? But I think what Dekker did with the story worked well. We were able to meet a new cast of characters, but also see how the others from previous novels have grown and struggled (which is always encouraging). I liked that because it was unique and I’ve been a fan of Remko and Carrington from the beginning. But the new storyline was interesting (and a bit different than what I was expecting), and the focus on light and darkness is one we can all understand, even if it isn’t to the extremes as some of the characters. Overall I enjoyed the conclusion, but I think The Choosing is still my favorite. If you enjoyed her first two, I think you’ll be satisfied with the conclusion. (Thank you to Tyndale for a copy of the book. All views expressed are my own.) Originally posted at: http://booksandbeverages.org/2017/01/31/returning-rachelle-dekker-book-review/
TheArtistLibrarian More than 1 year ago
A Satisfying Conclusion to Rachelle Dekker's Seer Trilogy! I was almost scared to read The Returning. Let me explain --I have a love/hate relationship with Ted Dekker's novels. He's a great writer and I was immersed in his worldbuilding and characters, but his series endings never gave me the satisfying conclusions I was personally hoping for. For example, both the prequel/sequel Green in his Circle Series or what I personally felt was a disconnected, "did-this-have-to-be-written" last two novels of The Lost Books. His series' finales never completely met the full potential that the previous books built up, leaving me bittersweet, slightly disappointed feelings toward his series. I realize that this doesn't really have anything to do with his daughter, Rachelle Dekker, but irrationally, all of this was in the back of my mind as I began to read The Returning. Fortunately, Rachelle's Seer Trilogy closes with a satisfying, though some might say quick, conclusion. I was taken aback for a moment when I first heard that The Returning would take place 20 years after The Calling. I was fully expecting book three to continue immediately after. Though Carrington and Remko have roles in this book, the main character truly is Elise, who we last saw as an infant. New characters, such as the seven young people chosen to infiltrate Authority City, were great. I wish we had more time to learn more about them --Kennedy and Kane Brant, Elise's younger sister and cousin, along with Willis Lane, the son of one of the Authority members, were the most highlighted of the Seven, though even then, I still wanted to know more. Maybe some e-novellas or short stories could be possible ... I definitely would enjoy that! In my previous reviews, I mentioned that though this is a Christian dystopian trilogy, I felt that it still could crossover to the mainstream market without being being "preachy." The Returning felt like it had more blatant spiritual elements of this trilogy because of constant referrals of embodying light and darkness. Personally, as a Christian, these elements really stuck out to me, but there were also things that weren't clear enough to be distinctly "Christian" --it seemed like the spiritual elements focused on finding the light within yourself and though it's inferred that the light was given or placed there by the Creator or a higher power, it's abstract enough that it might not sit well with some Christians theologically. I give it pass since it's a fantasy world, but it did personally give me a slight pause, like something was "off." Also, the light and darkness gave people supernatural powers that made it seem "too easy" at times, but again, this is a fantasy novel ... However, I did like the emphasis Dekker placed that even "the bad guys" or those who were consumed by darkness also were originally "children of light" and could still be redeemed. In the current world we live in, I think it's good to keep the perspective that God loves all people, even those who oppose him. If the main theme of The Choosing was identity and The Calling's was fear, I think The Returning's theme is forgiveness ... Overall, I enjoyed the Seer Trilogy and am intrigued to see what Rachelle Dekker will write next! [Disclosure: I received a copy of this book from the publisher for review purposes.]
Bookworm_Babblings More than 1 year ago
I received a free copy of this novel from Tyndale House Publishers in exchange for my honest review. The Returning is book three and the final book in The Seer series. This was an eagerly anticipated finale to a brilliantly written series by debut author Rachelle Dekker. Usually, by the time you've reached the final book in series, the story tends to slow down. But The Returning kept my interest right to the very end! The story begins 20 years in the future, with a greatly anticipated good vs evil battle. I liked that they focused on Elise and we get to watch her grow from victim to victor. I loved the message that the story gives; that we as Christian are to always let our light shine to those around us.
soleilB More than 1 year ago
When I first began to read the Seer books, I was a bit hesitant, but overall excited. With each book Rachelle writes, you can see two things. Her growth as a writer, and how each book is better than the last. I enjoyed the Choosing. It had a message young girls need to hear, and then with the Calling and finally the Returning, each message and story got better and better. Yes it may be set in a dystopian world, but it is not the old cliche type setting that's story has been told in similar and plentiful ways, It is in its own area of writing. Rachelle has created an amazing new world, where the cliche just doesn't even fit in. I found myself quite enjoying it. So when I saw that the third book in the series was finally coming out, I was stoked to be able to get my hands on it. Set 20 years after the second book, so much has happened, yet not so much that you feel left in confusion. When Carrington and Remko had to leave their newborn child, you were left with such heartbreak, but now you are able to see her and what has happened to her. I loved the character development with Elise and Willis, and then Jesse. Rachelle did such a good job with each of her characters, making you grow attached to them, secretly rooting for some while totally despising others. I also loved how the authoress showed the spiritual warfare going on. I love stories that show the Light vs. the dark, and I feel like Rachelle did a wonderful job showing what was going on. Is the Seer series one I would recommned? Yes it is. The series is a new dystopian world and has a creative and captivating storyline, as well as amazing characters,
ARS8 More than 1 year ago
The Returning by Rachelle Dekker was the climax of a very unique dystopian world, adding spiritual depth often lacking in the genre- the kind of spiritual depth needed to make a realistic or at least hopeful world (a spiritual sense that definitely gets allegorical at times). The Returning is different even from its first two books, if not in essence, than in feel since it takes place twenty years after the last one, the protagonist being the daughter of the former two protagonists. Like her parents, she has to come to terms with the dark, dystopian world around her- and the Light calling to her- in her own time. But unlike her parents, she has something akin to a spiritual gift/superpower that makes her the last chance for freedom to a city of brain-dulled, very obedient drones that were once human. But at what physical and emotional cost will this be to herself? I had a love/hate relationship with this book. Love because of what happened to my favorite character and hate because of what didn’t (this is what happens when you begin scheming with someone else’ characters before they have completed their series...). While the previous two books liked to play with my emotions and run off with my visceral organs every now and then, by the climax this book seemed to be dragging me across the room, up the wall, and then over the ceiling. But despite the intensity, this one seemed to strike a lighter note than the first two, though there were definitely some rough spots for our characters. I can’t wait to find out what else Rachelle Dekker has up her sleeve. I received a copy of this book for free from the publisher. I was not required to give a positive review and the views expressed are my own.
jebsweetpea More than 1 year ago
Nutshell: Twenty years ago two outlaws had to leave their baby girl in the city that they couldn't enter or they would die. Twenty years of heartache. Wondering. Guilt. Prayer. Shame. Thankfulness. Hope. In this breathtaking suspenseful final book of the the Seer Series, travel with Elise Carrington: the long lost daughter who thinks her parents abandoned her. Feel her fear, hurt and pain as she struggles with who she is, why she's still alive and if she even has a purpose in life other than to feel abandoned. With her made up dreams that seem almost real, a battle is being raged between dark and light, good and evil and Elise finds herself the missing puzzle piece to a puzzle that will either finish torn apart, or put perfectly together. Pro's: Rachelle has done it again. I couldn't wait for this book to come out and I devoured it from beginning to end. What a masterful storyteller she is. You feel like you are walking along side all of the characters. The way she paints and tells her story is like a song that ebbs and flows. So well put together and keeps you moving along until the very end. Con's: You can't read this book on its own. But you will want to read the other two anyway, so it's actually a good thing! Recommendation: Read this series!!! It's futuristic, but the struggles are real, no matter the time period. You will not be disappointed! Tyndale House Publishers sent me this complimentary copy to review for them. Opinions expressed are my own. Q & A from the author: What themes are explored in this book? Identity is something I am always exploring, so that’s no different in The Returning. But in this novel I took a really hard look at forgiveness and how that relates to our journey of discovering who we really are. How do you hope this book will resonate with your readers? I hope, as with both of the other books, that the reader sees themselves in the characters and that the story causes them to look inward. To ask hard questions like, Who am I? What am I capable of? Do I see myself the way the Father does? Can I? I hope it challenges their idea of identity and then gives them hope to see themselves and others more clearly. Because that’s how these stories have impacted me, and we are all really just the same. About the Author The oldest daughter of New York Times bestselling author Ted Dekker, Rachelle Dekker was inspired early on to discover truth through the avenue of storytelling. She graduated with a degree in communications and spent several years in marketing and corporate recruiting before making the transition to write full-time. She lives in Nashville with her husband, Daniel, and their diva cat, Blair. You can find more about Rachelle Dekker and her books at http://rachelledekker.com