The Simple Wild: A Novel

The Simple Wild: A Novel

by K.A. Tucker

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781501133435
Publisher: Atria Books
Publication date: 08/07/2018
Pages: 400
Sales rank: 27,406
Product dimensions: 5.20(w) x 7.90(h) x 1.20(d)

About the Author

K.A. Tucker writes captivating stories with an edge. She is the bestselling author of the Ten Tiny Breaths and Burying Water series and the novels He Will Be My Ruin, Until It Fades, and Keep Her Safe. She currently resides in a quaint town outside Toronto with her husband and two beautiful girls.

Read an Excerpt

The Simple Wild

Prologue




November 15, 1993

Anchorage, Alaska

Wren sets the two navy suitcases next to the stroller and then reaches for the cigarette precariously perched between his lips, taking a long, slow drag. He releases smoke into the frigid air. “Just these?”

“And the diaper bag.” I inhale the musky odor. I’ve always hated the smell of tobacco. I still do, except on Wren.

“Right. I’ll go and get that,” he says, dropping the cigarette to the snowy ground and crushing it with his boot. He clasps his callused hands together and blows into them as he rushes back out to the tarmac, shoulders curled inward, to where the Cessna that delivered us here awaits its hour-long flight home.

I quietly watch, huddled in my plush, down-filled coat against the icy wind, fiercely holding onto the resentment I’ve been carrying for months. If I don’t, I’ll quickly be overwhelmed by the pain of disappointment and impending loss, and I won’t be able to go through with this.

Wren returns and settles the hefty red bag on the asphalt, just as a grounds worker swings by to collect my belongings. They exchange pleasantries, as if this is just any other passenger delivery, before the man shuttles my things away.

Leaving us in tense silence.

“So, what time do you get in?” Wren finally asks, giving the perpetual brown scruff on his chin a scratch.

“Noon, tomorrow. Toronto time.” I pray Calla can handle ten hours of traveling without a meltdown. Though, that might distract me from having my own meltdown. At least the next plane is substantial, unlike the tiny things Wren insists on flying. God, how on earth did I ever think marrying a born-and-bred bush pilot was a good idea?

Wren nods to himself, and then pulls our sleepy daughter out of the stroller and into his arms. “And you? Are you ready for your first big plane ride?” His wide grin for his daughter makes my heart twist.

For the hundredth time, I wonder if I’m being the selfish one. If I should grit my teeth and bear the misery, the isolation of Alaska. After all, I made the bed I’m running from now. My father was quick to remind me of that when I admitted to my parents that life with Wren isn’t as romantic as I’d convinced myself it would be. When I admitted that I’ve cried at least once a day for the past year, especially during the painfully long, cold, dark winter, when daylight is sparse. That I hate living in the last great American frontier; that I crave being close to my family and friends, and the urban bustle of my childhood. In my own country.

A deep frown line forms in Wren’s forehead as he plants a kiss on our happy, oblivious seventeen-month-old’s nose and sets her onto the ground. She struggles to toddle around, her stocky body bundled in a thick bubblegum-pink snowsuit to keep the icy wind at bay. “You know you don’t have to leave, Susan.”

As quickly as I’d been softening, I harden again. “And what? Stay here, and be miserable? Sit at home with Calla under a happy lamp while you’re out, risking your life for a bunch of strangers? I can’t do it anymore, Wren. Every day is harder than the last.” At first I thought it was postpartum depression, but after months of flying back and forth to Anchorage just to talk to a therapist and refill a prescription for antidepressants that did little more than make me sluggish, I’ve accepted that it has nothing to do with hormones. And here I was, naïve enough to think Alaskan winters would be manageable, having grown up in Toronto. That being married to the love of my life would outweigh the challenges of living here, of having a husband whose chances of dying at work on any given day are alarmingly high. That my adoration for this man—and the attraction between us—would be enough to overcome anything Alaska threw at me.

Wren slides his hands into the pockets of his navy checkered down vest, focusing his attention on the giant green pom-pom atop Calla’s knit hat.

“Have you at least looked into flights over Christmas?” I dare ask, my last-ditch attempt.

“I can’t take that much time off; you know that.”

“Wren, you own the company!” I throw an arm toward the plane he brought us to Anchorage in, to the ALASKA WILD logo across the body. There are plenty more with the same emblem that make up the Fletcher family business, a charter company left to him after his dad passed away five years ago. “You can do whatever the hell you want!”

“People are counting on me to be here.”

“I’m your wife! I’m counting on you! We are counting on you!” My voice cracks with emotion.

He heaves a sigh and rubs the wrinkles from his brow. “We can’t keep going ’round in circles like this. You knew when you married me that Alaska is my home. You can’t just change your mind now and expect me to up and abandon my entire life.”

Hot tears burn against my cheeks. I furiously smear them away. “And what about my life? Am I the only one who’s ever going to sacrifice in this relationship?” I never planned on falling head over heels for an American charter pilot while I was in Vancouver for a bachelorette party, but I did, and since then, it’s been all on me to keep us together, and I’ve done it with the reckless fervor of a woman madly in love. I moved across the country to British Columbia and enrolled in a horticultural program, just so I could be closer to Alaska. And then, when I found out I was pregnant, I dropped out of school and moved to Wren’s hometown, so we could marry and raise our child together. Only, most days I feel like I’m a single parent, because Wren’s always at the damn airport, or in the air, or making plans to be.

And what am I left with? Dinner plates that grow cold from waiting, a toddler who asks for “Dada” incessantly, and this inhospitable subarctic soil that I’m lucky to grow weeds in. I’ve just kept on giving this man parts of me, not realizing that I was losing myself in the process.

Wren looks past me, watching a commercial plane as it takes off from the nearby international airport. He looks desperate to be back in the air, away from this never-ending fight. “I want you to be happy. If going back to Toronto is what you need to do, then I’m not going to stop you.”

He’s right; we can’t keep doing this, especially if he’s not willing to sacrifice anything to keep me around. But how can he just let us go like this? When I announced that my ticket was one-way, he did little more than grunt. Then again, I shouldn’t be surprised. Expressing feelings has never been one of Wren’s strengths. But for him to simply fly us here and set our belongings on the cold, hard ground next to us . . .

Maybe he doesn’t love us enough.

I hope that my mother is right, and a few months without a wife to cook his meals and warm his bed will jog a change in perspective. He’ll realize that he can fly planes anywhere, including Toronto.

He’ll realize that he doesn’t want to live without us.

I take a deep breath. “I should go.”

He settles those sharp gray eyes on me, the ones that ensnared me four years ago. If I’d had any idea how much heartache the ruggedly handsome man who sat down next to me at a bar and ordered a bottle of Budweiser would cause . . . “So, I guess I’ll see you when you’re ready to come home.” There’s a rare touch of hoarseness to his voice, and it nearly breaks my resolve.

But I hang onto that one word to give me strength: “home.”

That’s just it: Alaska will never feel like my home. Either he truly doesn’t see that or he simply doesn’t want to.

I swallow against the painful ball in my throat. “Calla, say goodbye to your daddy.”

“Bye-bye, Da-da.” She scrunches her mitten-clad hand and gives him a toothy grin.

Obliviously happy as her mother’s heart breaks.

Reading Group Guide

This reading group guide for The Simple Wild includes discussion questions and ideas for enhancing your book club. The suggested questions are intended to help your reading group find new and interesting angles and topics for your discussion. We hope that these ideas will enrich your conversation and increase your enjoyment of the book.

Topics & Questions for Discussion

1. If you were to move to Bangor, Alaska, what luxury would be the hardest for you to live without?

2. Calla and Jonah both feel strongly about the benefits of their preferred living environment. What are some of the advantages of living in a city? What are some of the upsides of living in a more rural area?

3. The book’s title, The Simple Wild, is echoed in characters’ descriptions of Alaska. Discuss what you think “simple” means in this context. Why do you think the author chose this title? What is its significance in the novel?

4. Calla goes through a number of life-changing experiences, including meeting her father in person for the first time since she was a toddler, traveling around rural Alaska and seeing how people live there, her father’s illness, and meeting Jonah. How do Calla, Jonah, and Wren’s characters develop over the course of the book as a result of these experiences?

5. For Wren and Susan, their respective desires about where to live were deal breakers, despite their love for each other. What are your deal breakers? Are there things about your life that you would be unwilling to let go of if your partner or a potential partner wouldn’t or couldn’t agree to them, no matter how much you loved that person?

6. Simon serves as a voice of reason for Calla and is able to remain objective and compassionate, despite being emotionally involved both as her stepfather and as Susan’s husband. Although he doesn’t share his feelings with Calla, what do you think this story was like from his perspective?

7. As Calla gets to know her father, there is a lot of discussion of regret, both his own regrets in life and the possibility that Calla could regret not spending more time with him if he doesn’t survive his illness. Do you think Calla’s decisions helped alleviate remorse on either side, or is it in some way unavoidable for each of them to experience?

8. After Jonah’s plane crashes, Calla’s mother, Susan, tells her about the constant anxiety she had about Wren’s safety in his work as a bush pilot. Jonah plans to continue to work as a bush pilot for the rest of his life. How do you think this will affect his relationship with Calla in the future? Will Calla develop the same anxieties her mother held?

9. Ultimately, Jonah attempts to find a compromise that he and Calla will both be happy with. Do you think they will be able to make their relationship work?

Enhance Your Book Club

1. Invite your book club members to attend dressed for the Alaskan wilderness, complete with flannel and rain boots, and have someone bring jerky to snack on (though perhaps not muskrat jerky).

2. When Jonah hides Calla’s beauty products, she is forced to adjust to going out without makeup on. If you usually wear makeup, consider challenging yourself to go a week without it. Do activities you would normally wear makeup for: running errands, getting together with friends, even dressing up for a party or event. Share with your book group how the challenge made you feel. Did your awareness of it or feelings about it shift over the course of the week? Were there any times you felt more self-conscious? More confident? What were other people’s reactions to your makeup-free week?

3. Consider reading another of K.A. Tucker’s page-turning novels for your next book club meeting. For another compelling contemporary romance, your group is sure to love Until It Fades, or if you’re interested in a thrilling romantic suspense novel, you can check out Keep Her Safe. Visit K.A. Tucker’s website www.katuckerbooks.com to learn more about her and her books, or follow K.A. Tucker on Twitter @kathleenatucker, or Facebook at www.facebook.com/K.A.Tucker.Author.

Customer Reviews

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The Simple Wild: A Novel 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 18 reviews.
Anonymous 15 days ago
Loved! Read quickly
Anonymous 3 months ago
Anonymous 9 months ago
I loved this story. I am a huge fan of all her books. I would recommend this book as a must read!
voraciousreaderKB 9 months ago
UNFORGETTABLE!!! K. A. Tucker is one of my favorite authors. She is a wonderful storyteller and she knows how to write an unforgettable story with remarkable characters. The Simple Wild made me laugh and cry and held me riveted from start to finish. I was taken on an emotional journey right along with the characters in this book. Even though this is a deeply layered emotional story, it is also fun and there is a lot of bantering between the characters. Callie Fletcher is having a difficult time. She is fired from her job, she just broke up with her boyfriend and now, she is going to Alaska to see her dying father. Callie and her father have never been close and he has disappointed her on numerous occasions. Callie goes to Alaska apprehensive and not sure what to expect, never knowing how the trip will change and shape her life. Life isn’t easy for anyone living in Alaska and the people who live there are tough, simple and never complain. Callie arrives in Alaska clueless and self absorbed, but the people and the landscape change her perspective on life. Callie’s trip to Alaska forces her to expand her horizons and look at life differently and she grows from an immature girl to an insightful woman. Jonah is a pilot working for Callie’s father in Alaska. He is a big, tough guy but he can also be funny and caring. He looks like a lumberjack and is the opposite of the type of guy Callie usually finds attractive. Jonah loves giving Callie a hard time and strives to make her look at the world differently. He is a simple man with simple needs and the last thing he wants is to fall for a high maintenance woman like Callie. I loved Jonah and Callie together. I enjoyed all their banter and practical jokes and how they help each other through a tough time. They learn about love, not only from each other, but by observing others around them. I was pulling for them to overcome their differences and somehow find a way to be together, but I was never quite sure how it would end. Their relationship slowly develops and they slowly fall for each as they go through an emotional time together. Jonah and Callie help each other grow into the people they are meant to be. Thanks to the author for providing a copy of this book vIa Cocktails and Books and Netgalley. The opinions expressed are my own.
voraciousreaderKB 9 months ago
UNFORGETTABLE!!! K. A. Tucker is one of my favorite authors. She is a wonderful storyteller and she knows how to write an unforgettable story with remarkable characters. The Simple Wild made me laugh and cry and held me riveted from start to finish. I was taken on an emotional journey right along with the characters in this book. Even though this is a deeply layered emotional story, it is also fun and there is a lot of bantering between the characters. Callie Fletcher is having a difficult time. She is fired from her job, she just broke up with her boyfriend and now, she is going to Alaska to see her dying father. Callie and her father have never been close and he has disappointed her on numerous occasions. Callie goes to Alaska apprehensive and not sure what to expect, never knowing how the trip will change and shape her life. Life isn’t easy for anyone living in Alaska and the people who live there are tough, simple and never complain. Callie arrives in Alaska clueless and self absorbed, but the people and the landscape change her perspective on life. Callie’s trip to Alaska forces her to expand her horizons and look at life differently and she grows from an immature girl to an insightful woman. Jonah is a pilot working for Callie’s father in Alaska. He is a big, tough guy but he can also be funny and caring. He looks like a lumberjack and is the opposite of the type of guy Callie usually finds attractive. Jonah loves giving Callie a hard time and strives to make her look at the world differently. He is a simple man with simple needs and the last thing he wants is to fall for a high maintenance woman like Callie. I loved Jonah and Callie together. I enjoyed all their banter and practical jokes and how they help each other through a tough time. They learn about love, not only from each other, but by observing others around them. I was pulling for them to overcome their differences and somehow find a way to be together, but I was never quite sure how it would end. Their relationship slowly develops and they slowly fall for each as they go through an emotional time together. Jonah and Callie help each other grow into the people they are meant to be. Thanks to the author for providing a copy of this book vIa Cocktails and Books and Netgalley. The opinions expressed are my own.
mjlovestoread 10 months ago
The Simple Wild has left me breathless. This superbly-written story is quite possibly K.A. Tucker's most moving book to date as it is much more than just your typical romance. It is truly a soul-searching journey for Calla Fletcher and both the man she is about to lose and the man she has just found. What I find so damn extraordinary time and again is how the Author masterfully eases me into her words right from the start. With a heartbreaking prologue, I was beyond intrigued to see how the actions of Susan and Wren Fletcher would affect their daughter 24 years in the future. Calla is a feisty if albeit a bit spoiled 26 year old, and her decision about visiting her absent father in the wilds of Alaska is quite a shock to both her and those who love her. But her mother Susan and the ever-patient stepfather in Simon provide our heroine with the guidance and support she needs to face her past in order to realize her future. The sky cowboy and the fashion instagrammer. Oh my. Despite their very rocky first impressions of one another, there was this definitive spark between Calla and Jonah, her father's right-hand man. You could just tell something was there between them despite his penchant for calling her Barbie and she referring to him as a Yeti. Talk about a fish out of water. Calla was not in her element being in the oft-times barren part of Alaska. But I admired her willingness to try for Wren. To 'suffer' through being without the comforts of her life back in Toronto. Despite it being tough for her, she proved she truly was her father's daughter and could handle most that came her way. The Author gives us a birds-eye view of a part of the world we don't often see. Getting to witness through Calla's eyes, the beauty that is Alaska was a true added bonus for me. The wilderness backdrop to both Wren's deterioration and the burgeoning romance between Calla and Jonah could not have been more perfect. Calla was truly reborn in her native land in spite of herself and as she flew in the small planes that are part of her father's company, Alaska Wild, you could feel her spirit soar just as high. This glorious story took me through a myriad of emotions. The wickedly subtle humor that is evident on almost every page was sharp and kept me smiling through the tougher scenes. The heart-wrenching last quarter of the book had me in tears more than once as realizations come to the forefront and old wounds are finally healed. My soul was full, though, as secondary characters, particularly Aggie and Mabel and the always caring Simon, continued to be the strength Calla needed as Wren continued to fade. The people of these small villages in 'the middle of the middle of nowhere' showed such hope in the face of adversity I couldn't help but admire them. Much like Calla finally realized after her time there. K.A. Tucker continues to give us stories that are unique, well-researched and full of heart. The road to one's happiness is never what one might seem and with The Simple Wild, Calla proves that time and again. Her desire for happy in the world she left looks much different in the world she discovers and I'm quite pleased at how it all concluded. Her journey to self-discovery is quite simply beautiful and I am over the moon at having the chance to experience it. The Simple Wild is a jewel of a read and one I will happily recommend. This is a definitely a 5+ star book and a story I will revisit often.
Anonymous 11 months ago
KA Tucker is becoming my favorite author. This story will make you laugh and also make you cry. A very good story.
Anonymous 11 months ago
Love her books. Can't wait for more in the series
BookAngel_Emma 11 months ago
Oh, my heart – The Simple Wild will pierce your heart and linger in your thoughts. I’m going to sound completely cliche in my adoration of The Simple Wild although I am not going to go into plot details (seriously just read it). The Simple Wild deals with a lot of issues and the emotions associated with them. Family is the foundation of the story and the base with which each individual builds their perception of the world on top of. It shows how parents are human and therefore fallible but also how those flaws and failures affect the children within that circle. Perception is the keyword at the beginning of The Simple Wild. How a child’s impression of a situation is only one facet of the circumstances, yet can have a lifelong effect on the relationships they have and to some degree their self-esteem. Yet, you have to remember there are always two sides to any story and both sides need to be explored in order to gain true understanding. I loved the way in which Calla developed through the narrative, from shallow city girl to a well-balanced mix of both her mother and father. The beautiful descriptions and knowledge that has gone into the Alaskan setting brings the country alive within the pages and proves that reading really does allow you to travel without leaving the comfort of your sofa It also helps understand other cultures and their way of life even if it is so completely different from our own, building empathy in the process The characters within The Simple Wild are truly fantastic and very diverse; above all else, they appear extremely self-aware and as such allow the reader to reflect on their own attributes (both good and bad). The inclusion of psychology (and the amazing Simon) add to the ability to self-reflect while immersing yourself in the story. Prepare yourself before you enter the book, bring tissues, possibly chocolate and above all else get ready to lose a piece of your heart forever.
Xkoqueen 11 months ago
The Simple Wild, by K.A. Tucker is a funny, poignant, and emotionally gut wrenching tale of love, loss, regret and forgiveness. Tucker masterfully paints us a picture of the Alaskan wilderness, introducing us to the fictional town of Bangor, Alaska and its close-knit community of townspeople who are reliant on one another for friendship and sometimes survival. At the center is Wren Fletcher, owner of a cargo airline fleet and manager of a team of bush pilots. Wren is in love with, yet estranged from, his ex wife and daughter who are living in Toronto. Distance, and extenuating circumstances make daughter Calla feel like she was shortchanged by her father, but she wants to attempt to reconcile with him in Alaska before his imminent death. Still, she has doubts. Calla departs Toronto and is flown to Bangor on the last leg by Jonah, one of Wren’s bush pilots. Jonah and Calla are oil and water due to lifestyle differences of the big city and the Simple Wild. As you can imagine, author Tucker cultivates captivating romantic tension between these two. What holds them together besides physical attraction is their relationship and ties to Wren. Jonah helps Calla solve the puzzle of her own relationship with Wren just in time before Wren’s passing. The tragedy of reconciliation with little time left makes this an emotionally charged read. On the romantic side, the uncompromising lifestyles of Calla and Jonah seem to doom their relationship from the beginning, and author Tucker keeps us guessing and hoping for the best… that history won’t repeat itself. The ending is full of surprises and emotion in all of these relationships, and the resolution of each is inspiring. What makes this book exceptional is Tucker’s exquisite character development throughout. Each and every character is both likable and memorable and a welcome addition to the story.
Lorizen 11 months ago
My review won't do this book justice. I honestly can say it's up in the top 5 books I've read this year. From the characters to the story line it's perfection. She wrote this with every emotion you could wrench out of a story, it's glaringly real. Calla lives in Toronto with her mother the perfectionist florist and step father the psychiatrist. She's just had a truly sh** day, losing her job due to restructuring, her boyfriend is unavailable and her friend beckons her to have a night out on the town. Stepdad reminds her to take the trash to the curb. Calla is estranged from her father, her mother left him in Alaska to return to Toronto when she was 2. There were several failed attempts at meeting but essentially he's a stranger. He owns a small airline in the western tundra of Alaska, where nothing comes in except via air. She's dodged one call from there, when she's leaving her step dad hands her the phone and it's an unfamiliar voice who seems to know her well and seems to know her father even better. She's calling to tell her, her father is ill and things don't look good and giving her the chance to come and meet her father. Who is a stranger to her. She makes no promises but gets her e mail and tells her she'll decide. The woman at the other end of the line is gentle and encouraging but also understanding. Calla's mother never stopped loving her father, despite being married to Ollie all these years. Ollie asks Calla the right questions and pretty much helps Calla decide to go for one week. That's all. When out with her friend that night she spots her boyfriend with a group from his work and his hands on another women, Calla is done. She's not angry, the relationship has outlived itself. That too helps her decide. Her trip is horrendous and worse yet, she's not a good flyer and is met in Anchorage by a real putz Jonah. Jonah brings the smallest plane they have and takes her on the worst flight of her life. No room for her luggage. She's forced to cram a few things into a small duffle with promises her luggage will be sent along on the next cargo flight... right. Jonah who Calla calls Yeti is one ornery sob. Bad attitude, judgemental and has his own nonsense he's dealing with along with the illness of a man he's comes to call his best friend. A man who gave him a chance. Jonah is the best pilot inherited father's business. Agnes works for her Dad also, she's the one who called. She's kind and also witty. Easy to like and caring. She makes excuses for Jonah's behavior that I honestly wouldn't have been anywhere close to forgiving. Her father lives in the same house that she was born in. Her room still the way it was when she and her mother left. Little calla lilies painted on the walls. It takes them a while to get reacquainted both uncomfortable and not knowing what to say, she feels like an outsider in this man's life. She's helped along by Agnes and some of the friends there. Everyone knows her Dad, he's the lifeline to the small villages that dot this frozen landscape. As Calla becomes familiar with the lay of the land up there and the tension between her and Jonah eases somewhat, she begins to understand her father's choices, and also how evasive he is about his illness and what the near future holds. She decides to extend her visit, not ready to go home. Her father knows what's coming and already has some plans in place, the other person who knows is Jonah. Jonah and Calla develop a relationship of sorts that starts with them f
Boundlessbookreviews 11 months ago
There’s always those type of books that leave you reeling with emotion. And that is precisely what The Simple Wild did. Calla hasn’t seen her father in over 20 years, but some news comes that can’t keep them apart any longer. So Calla travels to Alaska to see what the wild is all about. I’m still so emotional from this book and still just want to cry after reading. It’s a beautiful story. With all these lovely characters. You can’t help but love them. Tucker has always been one of my favorite authors. Every book she comes out with I’ve loved. But this one by far is the best. This is Tucker. This is the brilliant writing, that tugs at every emotion. You can feel that love they have for each other. The passion and care. If I could give this a million stars, I would, and still wouldn’t do this book justice.
slsuhr 11 months ago
This book was everything I didn't even know I wanted. Seriously. It was everything. I was sucked in immediately by Ms. Tucker's engaging brand of storytelling and ultimately found that this was one of the rare books that I never wanted to end. I didn't count down my percentage to the ending. I didn't start anticipating the next book I was going to lose myself in, I was rooted deeply in Bangor, Alaska, with this authentic and heart-stealing cast of misfits and I never wanted to leave. The Simple Wild is so much more than a romance. It's a love story, through and through, but that love extended far beyond Calla and Jonah. There are many layers here and all of them are emotional. I mean, make no mistake, this book is heartbreaking. I had some sniffily, hiccuppy, sobby tears over the course of the story. However, despite that admission, I do not think I would call it an ugly cry book. I did not feel like it preyed upon my emotions. In fact, I think it was balanced with a lot of playfulness, humor, and sweet emotion. The heat level is low here, but the chemistry still snapped and sparked and held my heart captive for nearly the entire book. This is a slow burn - my impulse is to call it a "sweet slow burn", but that would not be entirely accurate. There's an enemies-to-lovers component here that takes a while to warm up, but I enjoyed every minute of their journey toward each other. I loved them together. If I have a complaint, it's that I wanted more. I've already said I wasn't ready for it to end. I would have liked an epilogue. I would have liked a glimpse into the future. I would have liked just a little more time with Calla and Jonah because my heart wasn't ready to let them go, and because my brain just plain wanted to know what happened next. That said, I will still shout from the rooftops that you need to read this book! I know that this story will stay with me for a long time. I was touched by it, and I fell completely and hopelessly in love with it. Definitely - 100% - do not miss it! ~ 4.5 Stars
rodeorocks13 11 months ago
K.A. Tucker gives new meaning to the word yeti. After Calla receives a call about her father, whom she hasn’t seen since she was two, she makes her way to the Alaskan wilderness to get to know him. What she doesn’t expect to find is an angry yeti bush pilot to butt heads with. Will the simple wild be to much for the city girl to handle? The Simple Wild has got to be up there in my list of favorite romance novels and one of my favorite K.A. Tucker books. She managed to take two totally different characters and perfectly form it into a realistic romance. I love how the simple wild sticks out from the same repetitive themes. I rarely see romance novels about bush pilots and its great to see a different theme that stuck out. This novel really has everything. Humor, heartache and romance all put together in a hard to put down and irresistible story. It makes you question what is out there and what you could be missing. Complimentary copy provided by the publisher and Netgalley in exchange for an honest and unbiased review.
Diane Plourde 11 months ago
This was not a story or a book that I just read. It was an adventure I lived through and enjoyed immensely. This 6 star story made me feel so much for these amazing characters. Calla gets a phone call she never expected. At the age of 2, her mother left Alaska with her to never return. Leaving a father rooted to the Alaskan wilderness. Now at 26 she must decide if she goes back to see her father. Her mother left because she wasn’t meant to live that life. Now Calla needs to decide if she’s like her mother. I literally felt like I was living through these amazing characters that made me fall in love with. The bantering and camaraderie between Calla and Jonah had me laughing out loud quite a bit. They made this adventure so much more fun in the light of the heartbreaking events. There was never, I mean NEVER a dull moment. It was highly captivating an addicting. A lot of effort seems to have been put into creating this amazing adventure. The details, the scenes were impeccable. I felt like I was there, like a movie playing in my mind. An original storyline that captured my undivided attention. Bottomline is this a MUST read. Standalone told in Calla POV only, but I felt everything from the other characters in this story. It does come with an HEA. I strongly recommend this story.
JezzaBelle 11 months ago
The Simple Wild by K.A. Tucker was such a smoothly written masterpiece. The characters felt immediately like old friends. The setting, small-town Alaska, was captured so vividly, I could see the modular house with the beat up truck sitting beside it. I could hear the airplane engines come to life from the hangar down the road. It was as comforting as hot chocolate and peanut butter pie. I absolutely fell in love from the very first words. Upon hearing that her father, Wren, has a potentially fatal illness, Calla decides to make the journey back to the one-horse town in Alaska that she left when she was 2 years old. To say that the relationship between her and Wren is awkward is putting it mildly. Calla holds A LOT of resentment and I have to say that I don't blame her. Wren isn't exactly father material and has a better relationship with literally EVERYONE else than he has with his own daughter. It's painful and, like Calla, I have a hard time liking him for most of the book. Next, we need to talk about the angry yeti, Jonah. Jonah works for Wren, flies for him, and he picks Calla up at the airport to fly her to the more remote area of Bangor. Jonah and Calla's interactions are so hateful it's comical. They both have preconceived ideas about the other and about how the other SHOULD be acting. Needless to say, they are both wrong, but it sure is fun to read. Their every encounter sizzles, whether with anger or repressed sexual tension and when they finally begin to get the true picture of the other, it is magical. They each provoke something in the other and eventually begin to bring out the good in each other. This is unequivocally my favorite of Tucker's stories. The snark and sass are epic and amazing. The adventure is subtle yet exciting. My favorite part is how much I learned. It was such an educational book as well as entertaining. I loved the question of 'Why would anyone live there like that?' And the simple answer of ‘its their home’. It was just a thought-provoking book in so many ways. It was simply awesome.
Angela Vittengl 11 months ago
My tears cried tears, my heart exploded, and my laughter rang loud. The Simple Wild was anything but simple. City girl Calla leaves her upper-class home in Toronto to travel to Bangor, Alaska, to visit her ailing father. While Calla was uneasy about seeing her father for the first time in 24 years, experiencing the rugged wild her mother spoke so often about was equally as daunting. She didn’t anticipate though, that her biggest challenge would be from the man she nicknamed the Yeti. Jonah challenges her beliefs about herself, her dad and her life. He forces her to reevaluate what’s important and to take in the beauty around her. Jonah and Calla were night and day. They were oil and vinegar. Where he was used to the relaxing calm of the wild, she was a city girl at heart, with places to go and people to see. She dressed up in two hundred dollar sweaters and he wore relaxed shirts and jeans bought at the local mart. She learned to see through his grumpiness and he appreciated her sass and backbone. By the time Calla is to return to Toronto, neither want to imagine life without the other person in it, but the city girl needs her city and the Yeti, won’t leave his wild . ❝I did warn you about falling in love with one of those sky cowboys, didn’t I?❞ I’m not sure how to express all of the overwhelming feelings swirling in my head right now. Wren, Calla and Jonah’s story touched me profoundly and viscerally. I lost my dad to cancer almost 5 years ago, July 13, 2013. It was devastating and heartbreaking. Reading the story of these three brought all those feelings back. My heart broke for them. It broke for me. Between the physical decline, to hospice, to the anger, fear, and regret these characters experienced, Tucker’s portrayal of an ailing parent was honest and real. It could have been my family she was writing about. Yet, while there were tear-inducing moments, there were also many funny, light-hearted and heart-warming moments, too. ❝You asked why I kissed you.❞ I hazard a glance upward, to find his piercing blue eyes alight with heat. ❝And you said it’s because you wanted to.❞ ❝That wasn’t the right answer.❞ He reaches up to smooth the wet strands of clingy hair off my forehead, his gaze wild as it skitters across my features. ❝You have been driving me f*cking insane for days and I couldn’t hold myself back for one more second.❞ I was so caught up in this story that when the end came, I felt an indescribable sadness. The story was consuming. The characters felt real. The writing was impeccable. This is my favorite K.A. Tucker book to date! THE SIMPLE WILD is beautiful slow-burn romance about family, forgiveness, and second chances. An ARC was provided in exchange for an honest review and did not influence my opinion of the book.
sonybless 11 months ago
Very moving and fantastically written novel by K.A. Tucker. This one may have moved Ten Tiny Breaths out of the top spot for me. It's the perfect balance of all the feels, comedic timing, and titillating romance. I almost felt like I was in Alaska (which I have no desire to go to) while reading this novel. Not only are the characters wonderful, but the way the surroundings are described set this book apart. The relationships, not only with the main character Calia and her father but with Jonah, were so realistic. I couldn't put this one down and I will definitely be re-reading this one as I feel the first time through I may have missed so much as I just needed to get to the next page to see how things unfolded. I wholeheartedly recommend this book, especially if you loved Ten Tiny Breaths. ARC Provided by Publisher for free, but this does not influence my review.