This One Summer

This One Summer

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Overview

This One Summer by Mariko Tamaki, Jillian Tamaki

A New York Times bestseller

A 2015 Caldecott Honor Book

A 2015 Michael L. Printz Honor Book

An Eisner Award Winner

Every summer, Rose goes with her mom and dad to a lake house in Awago Beach. It's their getaway, their refuge. Rosie's friend Windy is always there, too, like the little sister she never had. But this summer is different. Rose's mom and dad won't stop fighting, and when Rose and Windy seek a distraction from the drama, they find themselves with a whole new set of problems. One of the local teens - just a couple of years older than Rose and Windy - is caught up in something bad... Something life threatening.

It's a summer of secrets, and sorrow, and growing up, and it's a good thing Rose and Windy have each other.

This One Summer is a tremendously exciting new teen graphic novel from two creators with true literary clout. Cousins Mariko and Jillian Tamaki, the team behind Skim, have collaborated on this gorgeous, heartbreaking, and ultimately hopeful story about a girl on the cusp of childhood - a story of renewal and revelation.

This title has Common Core connections.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781596437746
Publisher: First Second
Publication date: 05/06/2014
Pages: 320
Sales rank: 55,785
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 8.40(h) x 1.10(d)
Age Range: 12 - 17 Years

About the Author

Mariko Tamaki is a writer of comics and young adult novels. Her books include the graphic novels Skim and This One Summer with Jillian Tamaki, and Emiko Superstar with Steve Rolston. Her upcoming works include a YA novel, Saving Montgomery Sole, and a comic about teen lez heartbreak.

Jillian Tamaki is an illustrator and comics artist. She is the co-creator of Skim and This One Summer, and the author of SuperMutant Magic Academy and Boundless (2017). She has taught comics and illustration in New York City at SVA and The New School. She lives in Toronto. jilliantamaki.com

Reading Group Guide

What is the process of creating your books? How is the work divided?

MT: Comics have this kind of unique way of unfolding that's very different from prose. With comic your focus is on script and narration. My goal, for my side of things, is to keep things very loose, knowing that the majority of what's happening on the page, what the reader will see, is illustration. It's a funny way to piece together a story, with these bits and pieces. I try to imagine it as this thing that's happening, like I'm a fly on the wall watching these conversations unfold. The narrator is sort of a version of me, watching the story unfold as "I" the character is inside it. I like the idea that it's a limited perspective, and my goal with that is always to play with that. With what characters know and don't know at any given moment. Once that's done I hand what is essentially a theater script (narration, dialogue, basic setting for scenes) over to Jillian, and it's her job to interpret and fill out the whole thing. Which is, I know, a ton of work. A. Ton. So I try to be as helpful as possible. And I wait for what is inevitable, which is change. Because once you add visuals the whole thing is naturally going to start moving around. It's funny because the conversations we had after I'd handed over the script were so great. It's like you're talking about this fictional family that's kind of YOUR family and you're like, "What's up with Alice?" In a way I felt like, "How can we help Alice?" was one of the conversations we kept having, which I think lends hugely the to the final story.

JT: People are often very fascinated by the collaborative aspect of our books and often remark that it seems like the books are made by one person. This is a huge compliment. I try to always honour the spirit of Mariko's work (or anyone's work, really), while also taking some ownership of the characters and story for myself.

What is the starting point for you when you create a character?

MT: I try to think of something they would say all the time. I feel like if I can get a kind of verbal hook on someone, I can figure them out.

JT: I think of a character I can draw from multiple angles. Very pragmatic.

Why did you choose blue ink for This One Summer?

JT: First and foremost I thought it would look cool. It is a slight reference to vintage manga and risograph, visually. But I think it also has an undefinable melancholy and nostalgia that adds a meaningful layer to the artwork.

Is the story autobiographical? What did you draw from your own life to create the story?

MT: After Skim came out there were a lot of people who inferred that because there were many similarities between myself and the main character that the story was not fictional. Which, by the way, it IS (fiction). After that I really tried to push myself to go outside of what was immediately ME when writing TOS. That said, I mean, your memories of being a kid are an invaluable resource. You need memory to write. But it's also about what you're observing in your current life. A lot of the kid stuff in TOS is from the kids I met later in life, who I find fascinating. KIDDING! (Not kidding.)

What is the most challenging part of making a comic?

MT: I think editing is a bit of a strange process for making comics. It's really this thing that you have to have a massive amount of trust from your publisher, that they would see what is essentially a skeleton and trust you to go off and make a whole person.

JT: Aside from the same old issues anyone would have making a book? The labour. The tedium. It is not a particularly lucrative endeavour if you break it down dollars per hour. A challenge of being a cartoonist is often one of economics.

What was your reaction to receiving the Caldecott honours?

MT: Being an artist is a largely thankless task that, at the same time, is fuelled by the reactions of readers, viewers, and so on. So of course it's good to know that some readers of note (librarians) liked your work enough to give it an honor. It means, to some respect, that you're on the right path or at least you're doing something right. I think the trick is not to be persuaded by that to either only do the things you're getting recognition for or to do the things you think will get recognition. So it's awesome but it's not something I want to lean on or wear on my lapel every day.

JT: I agree!

Did you write This One Summer with any audience in mind?

MT: I knew that TOS was being published by a YA publisher. And I knew that it was going to be about, in part, younger people. But I don't think I tried to make it for anyone, aside from myself and for Jillian. Beyond that, I think it's a guessing game. And who wants to guess?

JT: I try to make books that adults would appreciate, even if it's technically going to be defined as a YA book. I'm actually less concerned about what a kid would like.

How do you feel about This One Summer being called a "children's book"?

MT: Well. It's not a children's book. It's a book for readers, I would guess, about 12 and older. I would like to think that this is not a controversial matter, although I know for some people it is, because readers, as I know them, self select. If you are a young reader, either this book is going to be given to you by a teacher or a librarian, or a parent, or you're going to find it somewhere and look at it and decide if you want to read it. I can't imagine a child is going to be into a comic like TOS. That said, since we've gotten some recognition from librarians and I've read a few more articles, I kind of like the idea that it's a book you could read as a kid, that has a place in young adult literature because it's not explicitly for young readers but about them. Beyond that, you know, it's about stuff I thought of when I was a kid, so why not?

Is this a feminist book?

MT: Yes. Because it was written by feminists.

What is your advice for people who are starting out in this industry? Who want to make comics?

MT: Just start making them.

JT: The bar for making comics is incredibly low. You need a pencil and some copy paper and you're ready to go. You don't even need to photocopy anymore, just post them on tumblr or twitter or instagram or whatever platform is popular when you're reading this.

Will you make another book together?

MT: Sure, if the right project comes up. I like to think our work is evolving, so it would have to be part of that continuum.

JT: Yup.

What are your upcoming projects?

MT: I've got a prose YA book, Saving Montgomery Sole, coming out with Roaring Brook/Penguin Canada in Winter 2016.

JT: My webcomic, SuperMutant Magic Academy, will be collected into a book and published by Drawn and Quarterly in April 2015. I will also have a small book called SexCoven, published by Youth in Decline, coming out in the Spring.

Customer Reviews

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This One Summer 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 14 reviews.
daniel_H More than 1 year ago
The Tamaki cousins have delivered with a book that deals with very real life events from the perspective of adults intermittently, but more so from that of children who are in that transitioning age range of 10 through 12. An age that most readers have likely forgotten about in themselves. The story is told simply through the main characters internal dialogue, and conversations. It really is through the combination of the writing, and lush visuals that "This One Summer" becomes something so much more engaging to read, and admire.
MissPrint More than 1 year ago
Rose has been coming to Awago Beach with her family every summer since forever. Rose's summer cottage friend--and seasonal younger sister, of sorts--Windy, is always there waiting for a new vacation filled with fun and adventures. But nothing is quite the same as it was even last summer. Caught uncomfortably between the familiarity of childhood and the wholly unknown world of growing up, Rose isn't sure anymore where she fits in at Awago, with Windy, or even with her parents. In a summer filled with things left unsaid--with change lurking everywhere--Rose and Windy realize that even as life threatens to shift in a new direction things like friendship can remain rock solid in This One Summer (2014) by Jillian Tamaki and Mariko Tamaki. This One Summer received a whopping six starred reviews over the course of 2014. It is also the first graphic novel to ever win Canada's Governor General Award for Illustration in an English Language Children’s Book (for illustrator Jillian Tamaki). (As Mahnaz Dar explains on SLJ this award has usually gone to picture books.) It's hard sometimes to remember that illustrations are a key part of the reading experience when looking at something that isn't a picture book. Graphic novels, of course, are uniquely suited to demonstrate a perfect blend of illustrative and textual storytelling. Given the ways in which readers interpret visual and written "texts", it's sometimes hard to notice how well the two integrate. It is also, sometimes, too easy to ignore what is being done exceptionally well. This One Summer is a deceptive book due in part to the seamless integration of graphical and verbal storytelling. In doing everything so very well here--so effortlessly--the Tamakis often erase their own work. Instead of seeing the intricate line work in each full page spread, we first see a beautiful picture. Instead of paying attention to how changing panels and page design move the reader through the story as easily as through a storyboard for a film, we initially only notice how quickly this book can be read. Throughout the novel the Tamakis capitalize on the graphic novel format to push This One Summer in new directions and stretch just how a story can be told. The motion and physicality, particularly whenever Windy is on the page, becomes palpable with each new frame. The varied design as the story shifts between full page illustrations, two page spreads and smaller panels also serve to move the plot smoothly along. With intricate illustrations and a nuanced, meditative plot, This One Summer is a subtle story about growing up and facing change that will resonate with readers of any age long after they read the final page.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Spoilers ~ I'm wondering why some people are saying this book is trash or filth- Is it because lesbians are mentioned, or there's teen girl who gets pregnant? Are you referring to the mothers miscarriage? Is it because the book has F bombs? That's life people, and kids are exposed to it everyday. The book isn't trash, it's a nice story and kept me entertained. It's not the best I've read, but it wasn't terrible.
JillJemmett 3 months ago
This is a great summer story. It deals with mature problems that aren’t always in teen/preteen novels. The two characters are preteens. They are just going through puberty, since they are always talking about getting boobs. That part was funny. I really liked Windy. She was a comic character. She was always dancing and being silly, but sometimes others laughed at her, rather than with her. There are different pregnancy issues in this book, which kids may not learn about in health class, but they can happen. Rose’s mom wanted to have another baby, but she couldn’t. She had miscarriages. Her insistence on having another baby made Rose feel like she wasn’t enough of a daughter for her. Rose and Windy like the cute boy who works at the convenience store. They overhear his conversations with his friends about another girl, who he got pregnant. The boy, called the Dud, refused to speak to her after he found out she was pregnant. He wasn’t nice, and the girls didn’t like him so much after that, but that is a real problem that some girls have to deal with. The graphics were also amazing. There was a lot of movement in the pictures, along with sound effects. It really looked like they were moving sometimes. The short panels that moved like a flip book also created movement in the illustrations. I really liked this graphic novel. It was emotional and serious, but there were some funny parts as well.
JillJemmett 3 months ago
This is a great summer story. It deals with mature problems that aren’t always in teen/preteen novels. The two characters are preteens. They are just going through puberty, since they are always talking about getting boobs. That part was funny. I really liked Windy. She was a comic character. She was always dancing and being silly, but sometimes others laughed at her, rather than with her. There are different pregnancy issues in this book, which kids may not learn about in health class, but they can happen. Rose’s mom wanted to have another baby, but she couldn’t. She had miscarriages. Her insistence on having another baby made Rose feel like she wasn’t enough of a daughter for her. Rose and Windy like the cute boy who works at the convenience store. They overhear his conversations with his friends about another girl, who he got pregnant. The boy, called the Dud, refused to speak to her after he found out she was pregnant. He wasn’t nice, and the girls didn’t like him so much after that, but that is a real problem that some girls have to deal with. The graphics were also amazing. There was a lot of movement in the pictures, along with sound effects. It really looked like they were moving sometimes. The short panels that moved like a flip book also created movement in the illustrations. I really liked this graphic novel. It was emotional and serious, but there were some funny parts as well.
Anonymous 11 months ago
Loved this coming of age story.It made me feel nostalgic of my previous summers.Overall,I 'd highly recommend this for anyone.
KrittersRamblings More than 1 year ago
My first graphic novel read and I will have to say I read this months ago, but wanted to put the review up on the official first day of summer. I enjoy that as a graphic novel it read fast, but in the end I felt like I was missing something. I don't know that I would continue to read them, I might on the side when life is crazy and I need something to read that is quick and easy, but this wouldn't be my go to reading genre. I loved the topic of this one. A summer vacation and girls who are moving out of childhood innocence and into young adulthood. I am glad this is the first graphic novel I read because I did enjoy the subject and I know that if I read more the subject matter would make a big difference in my enjoyment level.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is a fantastic graphic novel by my favorite team, Mariko and Jillian Tamaki. It is beautifully written and the art is so well done. I highly recommend this book!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A lot of this story is very vague and leave a lot left unsaid to the characters in the enviornment. They have mostly inner thoughts or reflections on events that already happened. That being said, the artwork is beautiful and this is a coming of age story is a very indirect way. This is not a traditonal young girls grow up story and while I was not dying to read it more than once, I can see why the younger generations may be able to relate to its message.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
SleepDreamWrite More than 1 year ago
While the story was okay, the art was just beautiful and well done. Mostly liked this for that to be honest. But the story has its moments.
Sandy5 More than 1 year ago