The Three Theban Plays: Antigone; Oedipus the King; Oedipus at Colonus

The Three Theban Plays: Antigone; Oedipus the King; Oedipus at Colonus

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781781398265
Publisher: Benediction Books
Publication date: 05/22/2017
Pages: 194
Sales rank: 733,239
Product dimensions: 6.14(w) x 9.21(h) x 0.45(d)

About the Author

Sophocles was born at Colonus, just outside Athens, in 496 BC, and lived ninety years. His long life spanned the rise and decline of the Athenian Empire; he was a friend of Pericles, and though not an active politician he held several public offices, both military and civil. The leader of a literary circle and friend of Herodotus, he was interested in poetic theory as well as practice, and he wrote a prose treatise On the Chorus. He seems to have been content to spend all his life at Athens, and is said to have refused several invitations to royal courts.Sophocles first won a prize for tragic drama in 468, defeating the veteran Aeschylus. He wrote over a hundred plays for the Athenian theater, and is said to have come first in twenty-four contests. Only seven of his tragedies are now extant, these being AjaxAntigoneOedipus the KingWomen of TrachisElectraPhiloctetes, and the posthumous Oedipus at Colonus. A substantial part of The Searches, a satyr play, was recovered from papyri in Egypt in modern times. Fragments of other plays remain, showing that he drew on a wide range of themes; he also introduced the innovation of a third actor in his tragedies. He died in 406 BC.

Robert Fagles (1933-2008) was Arthur W. Marks ’19 Professor of Comparative Literature, Emeritus, at Princeton University. He was the recipient of the 1997 PEN/Ralph Manheim Medal for Translation and a 1996 Award in Literature from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. His translations include Sophocles’s Three Theban Plays, Aeschylus’s Oresteia (nominated for a National Book Award), Homer’s Iliad (winner of the 1991 Harold Morton Landon Translation Award by The Academy of American Poets), Homer’s Odyssey, and Virgil's Aeneid.

Bernard Knox (1914-2010) was Director Emeritus of Harvard’s Center for Hellenic Studies in Washington, D.C. He taught at Yale University for many years. Among his numerous honors are awards from the National Institute of Arts and Letters and the National Endowment for the Humanities. His works include The Heroic Temper: Studies in Sophoclean Tragedy, Oedipus at Thebes: Sophocles’ Tragic Hero and His Time and Essays Ancient and Modern (awarded the 1989 PEN/Spielvogel-Diamonstein Award).

Table of Contents

The Three Theban Plays - Sophocles Translated by Robert Fagles with Introductions and Notes by Bernard Knox

Acknowledgments
Translator's Preface
Greece and the Theater

SOPHOCLES: THE THREE THEBAN PLAYSIntroduction to Antigone
Antigone

Introduction to Oedipus the King
Oedipus the King

Introduction to Oedipus at Colonus
Oedipus at Colonus

A Note on the Text of Sophocles
Textual Variants
Notes on the Translation: Antigone, Oedipus the King, Oedipus at Colonus
Select Bibliography
The Genealogy of Oedipus
Glossary

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The Three Theban Plays (Turtleback School & Library Binding Edition) 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 24 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I read this book for a classic myth class, I learned that excessive pride can make you try to defeat your destiny and that there is a higher power that is always looking after you. Your destiny good or bad will happen.
wenestvedt on LibraryThing 3 months ago
If you can, see also the stage musical, "The Gospel at Colonus" -- or at least get the soundtrack. Set in a black pentecostal church, starring Clarence Fountain & The Blind Boys of Alabama, a massive choir, guitarist Sam Butler, and assorted other musical & vocal powerhouses, it was one of the best stage performances I've ever seen (Guthrie Theater, 1986 or 1987).
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The Three Theban Plays are Greek tragedies that have remained in English literature for centuries after they were published. What is the reason for this everlasting existence of these pieces? The way that Sophocles presents his prose is beautiful, just like Shakespeare's stunning style of writing. No one in the 21st century will ever write like these literary geniuses. However, many people will not disagree on the fact that Sophocles' writing is abstract. Despite Sophocles' conceptual writing style, the Robert Fagles version of Antigone is a modern English edition that can be understood by 9th graders and above. This tragedy should be a must-read for everyone in high school because Antigone highlights important themes such as civil disobedience, hubris, atë, conscience versus law, etc.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
Just like all Greek plays, these three are all excellent. I especially like Oedipus the King, but all are great. These plays bring you back to a time that is probably difficult for people of today to understand, but it is still intriguing.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The Oedipus cycle is a greek tragedy, with elements of love, death, and it has comic relief. Probably the most entertaining Greek play, and it adresses many themes, and motifs. note that the chorus is used to tell what the average citizen is thinking, adn to provide historical significance
Guest More than 1 year ago
If you like Greek literature this is a good choice for you. Robert Fagles again does a great job of translating an ancient tale. I would recommend this to anyone who is interested.