Tiger Force: A True Story of Men and War

Tiger Force: A True Story of Men and War

by Michael Sallah, Mitch Weiss
3.9 28

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Overview

Tiger Force: A True Story of Men and War by Michael Sallah, Mitch Weiss

At the outset of the Vietnam War, the Army created an experimental fighting unit that became known as "Tiger Force." The Tigers were to be made up of the cream of the crop-the very best and bravest soldiers the American military could offer. They would be given a long leash, allowed to operate in the field with less supervision. Their mission was to seek out enemy compounds and hiding places so that bombing runs could be accurately targeted. They were to go where no troops had gone, to become one with the jungle, to leave themselves behind and get deep inside the enemy's mind.

The experiment went terribly wrong.

What happened during the seven months Tiger Force descended into the abyss is the stuff of nightmares. Their crimes were uncountable, their madness beyond imagination-so much so that for almost four decades, the story of Tiger Force was covered up under orders that stretched all the way to the White House. Records were scrubbed, documents were destroyed, men were told to say nothing.

But one person didn't follow orders. The product of years of investigative reporting, interviews around the world, and the discovery of an astonishing array of classified information, Tiger Force is a masterpiece of journalism. Winners of the Pulitzer Prize for their Tiger Force reporting, Michael Sallah and Mitch Weiss have uncovered the last great secret of the Vietnam War.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780759515734
Publisher: Little, Brown and Company
Publication date: 05/15/2006
Sold by: Hachette Digital, Inc.
Format: NOOK Book
Sales rank: 113,551
File size: 974 KB

About the Author

Michael Sallah and Mitch Weiss were co-authors of the Toledo Blade's remarkable series on the Tiger Force massacre. Together, they won the 2004 Pulitzer Prize for their Tiger Force stories. Sallah currently is the investigations editor for the Miami Herald. Weiss is now an editor with the Charlotte Observer.

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Tiger Force: A True Story of Men and War 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 28 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is a really terrible book. It is an attempt by two authors forty years after the fact to describe so called factual events from during the Vietnam War. The premise of the book rests upon the supposed exploits of a squad or platoon of men (approx 10-40 men, based on unit strength) that acted under orders to clear a free fire zone in 1968. The authors attempt to graphically expose various crimes such as civilian atrocities. The worst they come up with is a baby was killed and mutilated. Regrettable, but bad things happen in war. Left unmentioned by the authors are the atrocities performed by the Vietnamese on their own people (Hue, VC indoctrination squads etc)as well as on captured US soldiers. The emphasis in the book is...US all bad, Vietnamese a friendly innocent peace loving people. The two authors are another example of after the fact armchair journalists who attempt to judge the actions of others through their own skewed visions and present them as so called facts. In closing, I'm not trying to justify any sort of wrongdoing on the part of US forces, but I think the authors should have more of a balanced perspective. All they manage to do with this book is discredit all those who went and served honorably. I urge you not to buy this book.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Just read the excerpt of Ken Green And Sammy Yabarra. Since I grew up with both of them as youths in Globe...I can say that whoever did the investigative work had enough grasp on local info, but obviously over sensationalized to the extent that they left out some essential elements of truth and perspective that should have been apparent.They were NOT murderers - they were soldiers from backgrounds that made them excellent candidates for the job they were called/and or volunteered to do. If they were sanitized reporters who were good at telling stories about the dead 30 years after-the-fact, then they wouldn't have gone - but been draft dodgers.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This us the first time as a service member that I read an entire book for my professional military education. The story quickly caught my attention and as I read the book, I was shocked by the events that took place. Great story and recommend it to anyone to read.
jorge1711 More than 1 year ago
If what was write is only partially true, we as a nation have a powerful lesson learnt, which needs to be corrected. When I was in the RVG, I was more fearful of US troops than I was of the VC/NVA.
EugeneTX More than 1 year ago
This is an outstanding work regardless of how you measure it. The police investigation by Gustav Apsey brought clarity and truth to the original allegations and laid out for all to study how individual psychosis can become group psychosis. There are a number of intersects when one or more people within the platoon became aware of the behavior and could have done something to stop it. For the one reviewer, I have been there for 2 and one-half tours. You do not live in constant fear unless it is rocket, mortar, or artillery attack in which you can only hide. There is no way you can ever justify murder as an excuse for your own failings. For just a little context, these farmers in the coastal plains all the way around Viet Nam, were working ancestral lands for the most part. Before 1968, all of these people would have told you how much they loved the Americans, which was true, and hated the VC and later the NVA because they were taxed so heavily on their produce, which took away rice they needed to feed their family for the year. In fact, some of our best informants came from farmers who were trying to get rid of the tax collectors. They hated the relocation centers just as any Arizona rancher would have hated being forced to move to a population center or southern farmers who had been forced to leave his family lands. In other words, we started killing the people we were supposed to be protecting. This included, as the book points out, innocent old men, disabled old men, women, and children. I have been there. I have talked and eaten with these people. They are gentle and kind and still curious and loving toward those who really let them down. As you read this book, really get into understanding it by mentally comparing what you read to local farmers that you have known in NC, SC, Florida, GA, AL, MS, and LA. These people then and now cared only about their plot of land and feeding and clothing their family. Donald Wood will be remembered as someone who resisted joining the madness and trying to stop it. The Psychiatrists who did the early evaluation on Ybarra was working with the old DSM II and the Sociopathic or Antisocial Personality were two reasonably new concepts and just barely understood when DSM III was released in 1980. How one person could have started manifesting such behavior and then pulling in almost all others is , I think, pretty well unknown. I think the book would be an interesting starting point for the American Psychological/Psychiatric community to begin a study directly related to this case and how we prevent its reccurence in the future. I think it would be criminal for the APAs not to get involved. This is an excellent foundation for further study. For all others, I would simply say that if you can justify the types of psychotic behavior exhibited in this book, you may need (and probably do) serious psychiatric help yourself. This book is simply outstanding. The authors have written a work that few will exceed.
Ducate More than 1 year ago
This is a book that takes you beneath the surface of a controversial war and exposes everything wrong with the U.S. military policy in Vietnam: body count, free-fire zones, dehumanization, etc. This book is scary and yet, it tells the truth. I've read many military books, especially about the Vietnam, but this is undoubtedly one of the most compelling. Kudos to these journalists.
Guest More than 1 year ago
As an avid reader of military and political history, I unequivocably recommend this book. This is one of those books that evokes passion from both sides -- those who were in favor of the war, and those opposed. But from someone who knows the military, I have to applaud this work, as difficult as it is to read and comprehend what happened. I actually drew sympathy for the soldiers who committed these unspeakable acts, because the authors took you inside and made you understand what happens to men in war. Great work.
Guest More than 1 year ago
By far, one of the best military books I have read in the last several years. I am a veteran, so it takes a lot for me to say that, and I was in Saigon, so this is coming from someone who lived with a lot of anger for a long time. More than any work, Tiger Force helped break down and explain the American military strategy in Vietnam, and in the end, why it failed. This is based on hundreds of Army CID investigations records of the longest war-crime case of the Vietnam era. This story is based on the soldiers' own words from this investigation -- not from someone trying to remember. This is in their own words and it's chilling. This is about a platoon that completely went over the edge and into the abyss, killing hundreds of Vietnamese. I know there will be a lot of people who will be hand wringing and mad as hell that these events were brought to light, but you know? The truth hurts and they should get used to it. The most incredible part of this book is that the records were initially given to the reporters/authors by Henry Tufts, the man who founded the Army's CID. There was a reason he did this -- so for one moment, just try to think about why an outstanding officer and noted Army colonel would have unburdened himself of these records. Because he wanted the truth to come out. Now, it has.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Why did the authors wait for David Hackworth (founder of Tiger Force) to die, before publishing this book? I'm sure "the colonel"  would have some choice words and opinions on this work. The book is difficult to read. The authors tend toward run-on sentences and convoluted word craft. Yes, I can read the big words, along with small, but surely they must have been paid by word count! They tend to over-emphasize facts supporting their theses, while glossing over or ignoring other pertinent information. They perform much more like prosecuting attorneys and not investigative journalists. they purport to be.The writing style was more suited to a work of fiction than an honest effort  at journalism.
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basiclly a much slpwer version of Apocalipse Now
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bookworm1118 More than 1 year ago
An absolutely gripping book. I had the happy privilege of reading a pre-release copy of this book and couldn't put it down. Very well written and very thought provoking. A must-read for any history buff.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Fascinating book to read. Extremely well researched. Difficult subject to write about but done very well.
Guest More than 1 year ago
When you read a book like this, you want to stop all wars because you realize that ubless you have strong commanders, you're going to have atrocities.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book was a great reality into what went on during The War. It is very detailed and has a good flow. It also is really cool that the author takes many soliders from the team and follows them from there past to present time. !!!Ouststanding must read!!!